Colombian National Army frustrates FARC attempt to destroy an important bridge

Colombian National Army frustrates FARC attempt to destroy an important bridge

By Dialogo
October 01, 2014



It began with a phone call from a member of the Partners for Prosperity
network to the Colombian National Army on August 19: According to information
provided by the informant, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) was
planning on blowing up an important bridge in the Huila region.
The tip was specific and thorough: Three people in a Dimax pick-up truck had
approached the La Seca bridge in the municipality of Guadalupe, in southern Huila. A
man had exited the truck with a black package in his hands, which he placed
underneath the bridge before returning to the vehicle.
Reacting quickly to the intelligence, soldiers attached to the 12th Special
Energy and Roadways Battalion went to the site and found the black package the man
from the truck had placed under the bridge. The package was a cylinder bomb.
Soldiers immediately jammed cellular signals in the area, since terrorists typically
activate such devices with cellphones. They then destroyed the bomb with a
controlled explosion.
The tip and fast response by Army soldiers prevented a potentially
devastating attack by a bomb containing about 50 kg of AN/FO – an industrial
explosive mixture – and shrapnel. The explosive device had a lethal radius of 40
meters, which means it was strong enough to destroy the bridge, which connects Huila
and Caquetá.

Who is ordering the terrorist attacks?

Some analysts argue that the recent FARC attacks might have been ordered by
splinter elements of the terrorist organization, rather than the group’s
commanders.
“The FARC have been divided by the losses they suffered against the Colombian
government forces. These divisions could create isolated, dissident extremist groups
carrying out these attacks to derail a peace process [between the Colombian
government and the FARC being conducted in La Habana, Cuba] that is against their
interests,” said Héctor Chávez Villao, a security analyst at the University of
Guayaquil.
“The high command is aware that the government security forces are superior
and they gain no advantage from these provocations just now when they are
negotiating a peace settlement in La Habana, when they could become political
players in Colombia.”
Other analysts believe that it is difficult to know, at least for now, who is
behind the attacks.
“It is hard to identify whether these attacks come from the FARC high command
in order to demonstrate they still have power and gain some leverage with the
government during negotiations, or whether the attacks are being perpetrated by
smaller groups or cells that are acting independently,” said Yadira Gálvez, a
security analyst at the National Autonomous National University of Mexico (UNAM).
“We have seen that cooperation with the populace has been a key point in the
military’s efforts against these organizations and in the peace process. We have
received assistance from the people that has allowed us to identify their areas of
operation. Now the FARC no longer enjoy the protections that they had when this
ideological battle began. People are tired of living through war and feeling
threatened by these organizations,” concluded Gálvez.
That's how they negotiate?????? We need to unite the borders and honest guards who don't take bribes. Wake up, Brazil.
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