Perú and U.S. Hold Second Meeting on Cyberdefense and Cybersecurity

Perú and U.S. Hold Second Meeting on Cyberdefense and Cybersecurity

By Dialogo
February 03, 2015





With the goal of exchanging knowledge, representatives of the Joint Staff of the Peruvian Armed Forces, the Peruvian Secretariat of Security and National Defense, along with the Peruvian Armed Forces Telematics and Intelligence bureaus, met with authorities from the United States Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) for the II Discussion Meeting on Cyberdefense and Cybersecurity from January 20-22 at the headquarters of the Joint Staff of the Armed Forces in Lima.

“These meetings provide to us the best and latest information on new threats and global risks that have arisen over the last few years as quickly as we have made advancements in technology and cybernetics. The Armed Forces are not exempt from vulnerability and attacks if we do not take the necessary precautions,” said Peruvian Air Force Colonel Daniel Taipe Domínguez during his presentation.

The conference offered a space for each participating country to learn how the other responded to and dealt with common threats concerning cyberdefense and cybersecurity, in addition to debates about doctrine, organization, experiences, and lessons learned.

According to retired U.S. Air Force Major and SOUTHCOM representative Michael Donahue, “SOUTHCOM regularly sponsors meetings such as this one, called Subject Matter Expert Exchanges (SMEE), which allow each country the opportunity to learn from the other and share their best practices for work in specific areas.”

In addition to the above-mentioned topics, the three days of meetings allowed the participants to share information on best practices in cyberdefense. “I would say that cyberwar is the new threat for our century. A cybercommand is the most logical step for the Armed Forces in the future, and something positive that is being implemented by Perú,” Donahue stated.

The Joint Staff reported that its challenge is to create doctrine and to standardize strategies and methodologies for cyberdefense and cyberstrategy. Likewise, Peru’s military wants to implement a Cyberspace Operational Command (CODEC) and a Computer Incident Response Center at the country's Joint Chiefs of Staff and military institutions.

“A command like CODEC would be able to conduct military operations at a strategic, operational, and also information technology level. Other countries like Brazil and Colombia already have this ability, and I think that the time has come for Perú to join this select group,” concluded Col. Taipe.




With the goal of exchanging knowledge, representatives of the Joint Staff of the Peruvian Armed Forces, the Peruvian Secretariat of Security and National Defense, along with the Peruvian Armed Forces Telematics and Intelligence bureaus, met with authorities from the United States Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) for the II Discussion Meeting on Cyberdefense and Cybersecurity from January 20-22 at the headquarters of the Joint Staff of the Armed Forces in Lima.

“These meetings provide to us the best and latest information on new threats and global risks that have arisen over the last few years as quickly as we have made advancements in technology and cybernetics. The Armed Forces are not exempt from vulnerability and attacks if we do not take the necessary precautions,” said Peruvian Air Force Colonel Daniel Taipe Domínguez during his presentation.

The conference offered a space for each participating country to learn how the other responded to and dealt with common threats concerning cyberdefense and cybersecurity, in addition to debates about doctrine, organization, experiences, and lessons learned.

According to retired U.S. Air Force Major and SOUTHCOM representative Michael Donahue, “SOUTHCOM regularly sponsors meetings such as this one, called Subject Matter Expert Exchanges (SMEE), which allow each country the opportunity to learn from the other and share their best practices for work in specific areas.”

In addition to the above-mentioned topics, the three days of meetings allowed the participants to share information on best practices in cyberdefense. “I would say that cyberwar is the new threat for our century. A cybercommand is the most logical step for the Armed Forces in the future, and something positive that is being implemented by Perú,” Donahue stated.

The Joint Staff reported that its challenge is to create doctrine and to standardize strategies and methodologies for cyberdefense and cyberstrategy. Likewise, Peru’s military wants to implement a Cyberspace Operational Command (CODEC) and a Computer Incident Response Center at the country's Joint Chiefs of Staff and military institutions.

“A command like CODEC would be able to conduct military operations at a strategic, operational, and also information technology level. Other countries like Brazil and Colombia already have this ability, and I think that the time has come for Perú to join this select group,” concluded Col. Taipe.
The affinity and understanding of what is good for the country held by the Armed Forces, the Police and the Courts contribute to making successes happen and also the good salaries the Armed Forces, Police and Courts enjoy contribute to raising the morale of their active and retired members. How awful
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