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Funes Says That Insecurity Is The Greatest Threat To El Salvador and Central America

Funes Says That Insecurity Is The Greatest Threat To El Salvador and Central America

By Dialogo
September 16, 2009

Me parece que si bien es cierto el problema es una herencia del pasado,No se han tomado las medidas adecuadas; 1o. Los nombramientos en Seguridad publica han sido de dedo, comenzando con Sr. Ministro y el director de la PNC,Quienes no tienen ninguna cualidad para el combate a la delincuencia, a pesar que formaron parte de la Ex-Guerrilla, asi el director de la PNC, su cualidad haber sido jefe de columna de la Ex-guerrilla, de esa forma el Presidente Funes y su gobierno no podran combatir a las bandas criminales,llamadas Maras y Narcotrafico. Finalmente quieren involucrar a la Fuerza Armada lo cual sera un tiro de gracia para esta Institucion la cual estan haciendo desaparecer por via presupuesto, sino veamos los ultimos anuncios para el año 2010, tendran 30 millones menos, en cambio a la policia le aumentan. La solucion esta en hacer una reestructuracion de la politica de seguridad publica, la cual integre a los actores nacionales, en el combate a la delincuencia. The president of El Salvador, Mauricio Funes, considered insecurity to be the “greatest threat” affecting his country and the rest of Central America. “We should view insecurity as the greatest threat of El Salvador, and unfortunately, of all our Central American region as well,” Funes affirmed in a speech commemorating the 188th anniversary of El Salvador’s independence from the Spanish crown. He noted that the “Central American fatherland has been transformed into a route and a destination for drug trafficking and organized crime,” which, he said, “has become one of the great dangers for democratic society.” “And we should admit that on this terrain the policies implemented and actions taken to fight these plagues have been a series of failures. As a result, we know that this struggle is not won in isolation,” Funes indicated, after depositing a floral offering at the Monument to the Fathers of the Country in Liberty Park, in the center of San Salvador. In this context, he proposed developing within El Salvador’s borders “strict and strong policies articulated with the other countries in the region,” although he warned that insecurity is “too complex a subject to try to treat it with simple prescriptions.” Official figures indicate that between ten and twelve murders are reported daily in El Salvador, the most recent cases being those of a public-transportation driver and his assistant, who died on Monday in the locality of Ilopango, and four corpses found in a vehicle in San Salvador. For Funes, this process, “which began some years ago,” has “been growing and and growing and has taken over the communities, the cantons, the streets of the whole country.” “It’s not only a quantifiable phenomenon that comes and goes; the drama of insecurity, with its daily tragic manifestations and its impact on our lives, is an existential factor,” he lamented. He attributed this complex of problems to the “permanence of structural situations” like poverty, social exclusion, emigration, inequality, and lack of opportunities, as well as to the “great crisis of values” and the “aftereffects, still not analyzed and overcome, of the civil war that consumed so many lives in this country.” Funes met at the end of August with representatives of business, the academy, the Catholic Church, and the diplomatic corps, among others, to invite them to accompany his administration’s fight against crime. During the meeting, he indicated that his administration is not “standing with its arms folded” in the face of this plague, according to a statement issued by the President’s Office. The National Civil Police (PNC) revealed that 384 homicides were reported in May. The number dropped to 362 cases in June and again to 346 cases in July, and 278 deaths were reported through 26 August, according to the official statement. Figures from the Attorney General’s Office indicate that 2,265 complaints of extortion were filed through 6 August, a 55-percent increase compared to the same period in 2008. The majority of crimes are attributed to members of the “Mara-18” and “Mara Salvatrucha” gangs, which originated in the United States and spread to El Salvador in the late 1980s as a result of deportations of Salvadorans in contact with the gangs.
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