Dominican Armed Forces and Police Protect Consulates in Haiti

Dominican Armed Forces and Police Protect Consulates in Haiti

By Dialogo
February 02, 2015




The Armed Forces of the Dominican Republic and the country’s police are undertaking a security initiative known as "Operation Shield" designed to provide additional security to the nation’s diplomats in neighboring Haiti in order to prevent a recurrence of recent attacks on Dominican Consulates.

In addition to protecting Dominican officials in Haiti and securing the border between both countries, the Military’s objective is to ensure that civilians feel confident visiting their country’s diplomatic facilities in Haiti.

On January 11, Dominican Defense Minister, Lieutenant General William Muñoz Delgado, met with Minister of Foreign Affairs Andrés Navarro; Ruben Silié, the Dominican Ambassador in Port-au-Prince; and the five consuls accredited in Haiti in order to outline a series of actions aimed at “ensuring the safety of Dominican diplomatic personnel and infrastructure in the neighboring nation,” according to a press release from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MIREX) reported.

Several Dominican Military Commanders from the Army, Navy, and the Specialized Border Security Corps (CESFRONT) also attended the meeting, in which coordination and cooperation mechanisms were established to allow the government of President Danilo Medina to provide the public with confidence and assurance that Dominican diplomatic personnel and interests will be guaranteed, according to the MIREX.

Security in Haiti improved after violent attacks


As a consequence of the security initiative, which was launched about two weeks before the January 11 meeting, the Dominican Military and police forces have improved security for consular officials in Haiti, as well as along the border between both countries, where additional Dominican Troops and police have been deployed.

“Thanks to Operation Shield, which started in late December, the border has been reinforced, and the country also has a strategic plan to evacuate its consular staff in case of risk situations in Haiti,” Lt. Gen. Muñoz Delgado said on January 20, according to a report in Dominican daily Primicias
.

Operation Shield “is going well on land, at sea and in the air under the command of the Army, Navy and Air Force,” Muñoz Delgado said. “Reinforcement operations and greater border controls along the entire border have been established with more than 600 new soldiers assigned to CESFRONT and Army brigades in the area.”

This, in order to contain future protests that “may disturb the peace and tranquility along the border with Haiti,” Dominican Major General Matos de la Cruz said on January 8, according to according to media reports.

The security initiative came as a result of two attacks on Dominican consulates in Haiti in a span of 33 days.

On December 1, an angry mob attacked the Dominican Consulate in Juana Méndez, because a Dominican truck driver who had lost control of his vehicle fatally struck a 6-year-old Haitian girl on November 30, according to local daily Panama Post
. Rescue workers transported the driver to the Dominican Republic for medical care, but some protestors demanded that he be tried for the killing in Haiti.

Dozens of Haitians joined the protest to demand improved living conditions, lower fees on documents that would allow them to apply for naturalization under Dominican law, and reduced taxes on goods imported from the Dajabón region. Haitian National Police used tear gas to repel the violent demonstration, and no Dominican diplomats were injured.

A little more than a month later, on January 2, hundreds of Haitians pelted the Dominican Consulate in Anse-á-Pitres with stones, demanding the release of several fishermen detained by the Dominican Navy for illegally entering Dominican territorial waters, according to Crionline
.

The Dominican Consulate remained closed during the attack. No injuries were reported.





The Armed Forces of the Dominican Republic and the country’s police are undertaking a security initiative known as "Operation Shield" designed to provide additional security to the nation’s diplomats in neighboring Haiti in order to prevent a recurrence of recent attacks on Dominican Consulates.

In addition to protecting Dominican officials in Haiti and securing the border between both countries, the Military’s objective is to ensure that civilians feel confident visiting their country’s diplomatic facilities in Haiti.

On January 11, Dominican Defense Minister, Lieutenant General William Muñoz Delgado, met with Minister of Foreign Affairs Andrés Navarro; Ruben Silié, the Dominican Ambassador in Port-au-Prince; and the five consuls accredited in Haiti in order to outline a series of actions aimed at “ensuring the safety of Dominican diplomatic personnel and infrastructure in the neighboring nation,” according to a press release from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MIREX) reported.

Several Dominican Military Commanders from the Army, Navy, and the Specialized Border Security Corps (CESFRONT) also attended the meeting, in which coordination and cooperation mechanisms were established to allow the government of President Danilo Medina to provide the public with confidence and assurance that Dominican diplomatic personnel and interests will be guaranteed, according to the MIREX.

Security in Haiti improved after violent attacks


As a consequence of the security initiative, which was launched about two weeks before the January 11 meeting, the Dominican Military and police forces have improved security for consular officials in Haiti, as well as along the border between both countries, where additional Dominican Troops and police have been deployed.

“Thanks to Operation Shield, which started in late December, the border has been reinforced, and the country also has a strategic plan to evacuate its consular staff in case of risk situations in Haiti,” Lt. Gen. Muñoz Delgado said on January 20, according to a report in Dominican daily Primicias
.

Operation Shield “is going well on land, at sea and in the air under the command of the Army, Navy and Air Force,” Muñoz Delgado said. “Reinforcement operations and greater border controls along the entire border have been established with more than 600 new soldiers assigned to CESFRONT and Army brigades in the area.”

This, in order to contain future protests that “may disturb the peace and tranquility along the border with Haiti,” Dominican Major General Matos de la Cruz said on January 8, according to according to media reports.

The security initiative came as a result of two attacks on Dominican consulates in Haiti in a span of 33 days.

On December 1, an angry mob attacked the Dominican Consulate in Juana Méndez, because a Dominican truck driver who had lost control of his vehicle fatally struck a 6-year-old Haitian girl on November 30, according to local daily Panama Post
. Rescue workers transported the driver to the Dominican Republic for medical care, but some protestors demanded that he be tried for the killing in Haiti.

Dozens of Haitians joined the protest to demand improved living conditions, lower fees on documents that would allow them to apply for naturalization under Dominican law, and reduced taxes on goods imported from the Dajabón region. Haitian National Police used tear gas to repel the violent demonstration, and no Dominican diplomats were injured.

A little more than a month later, on January 2, hundreds of Haitians pelted the Dominican Consulate in Anse-á-Pitres with stones, demanding the release of several fishermen detained by the Dominican Navy for illegally entering Dominican territorial waters, according to Crionline
.

The Dominican Consulate remained closed during the attack. No injuries were reported.


It is undeniable that the knowledge of international events is important for people who want to be well informed. It's better for all the Dominicans to look for protection from the Dominican government since given the issue of racism, they are not guiding our country and we're not talking about skin color because all of us Dominicans are black. Rather we're taking about our country's homeland territory which is free and independent. Haiti, look for support from other countries in this cheap way it's no longer about us defending our color but rather our flag our country and our homeland Hi, good day, finally our republic has started to cover the role of the defense and the kidnapping of our citizens in and out of our country. The Haitians have taken advantage of our humility. It's time for our homeland to garner respect. Being humble does not mean we're weak. We're going to bring our military and police forces into action, and above all, our immigration. So many departments with people who do nothing. It's time for them to do something for their country... you are VERY wrong when saying that all Dominicans are black, go and do some actual research before saying such a bold statement.
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