U.S. Forces Provide Relief Aid to Japan

U.S. Forces Provide Relief Aid to Japan

By Dialogo
March 14, 2011

Excellent that the United States helps Japan get back on its feet. I congratulate the USA Armed Forces and give my condolences to the people of Japan, it will rise again like the Phoenix. All humanitarian aid is very good and it is time to forget about the differences. We should unite all of our strength in order to help our Japanese brothers, may the Lord of Divine Providence be a light to the people of Japan and bless them by soothing their pain and suffering. We Venezuelans must help those poor people who are going through something terrible with the loss of their homes. The President of the country should not do anything to help as this could happen in other cities and that is not what we want and no one wants that. That is why we must help each other and consider those people that lost everything. Rafael Lopez worker from Gudisa help with what you can

U.S. military forces are working alongside their Japanese counterparts to provide aid as the country digs out in the aftermath of the massive 8.9 magnitude earthquake and tsunami that struck March 11.
“Because of the longstanding and close working relationship between the U.S. military and its Japanese counterparts on a daily basis, the United States military has humanitarian assistance capabilities positioned in the affected regions that are ready to support emergency relief efforts and minimize human suffering,” U.S. Ambassador to Japan John V. Roos said in a statement to the media on 12 March.
Dubbed Operation Tomodachi — Japanese for “friendship” — U.S. military assets mobilizing in the area include a wide range of equipment, air, sea, and ground capability and expertise.
“We have units from all of our services, with a multitude of capabilities, from medical to communications to civil engineering, poised and ready to support where needed,” Roos said.
Yokota Air Base in Japan was instrumental in recovering airline traffic in the hours immediately following the earthquake, Roos said. Also, Yokota is being used as an alternate airfield for planes that cannot land at Tokyo’s Narita Airport.
U.S. Air Force and Marine helicopter and transport aircraft were moved from Okinawa to the U.S. military bases on Honshu.
Marines and sailors from III Marine Expeditionary Force are supporting relief operations and its subordinate units are providing command and control, aviation and logistics support, according to Marine Corps officials.
The troops are capable of providing food, water, transportation and other relief support.
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