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“The Armed Forces exist to ensure peace” – General Jaborandy, Force Commander, MINUSTAH

“The Armed Forces exist to ensure peace” – General Jaborandy, Force Commander, MINUSTAH

By Dialogo
January 27, 2015






The United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) was created through UN Security Council Resolution 1542 on April 30, 2004. Since then, at the invitation of the UN, Brazil has been contributing military and police troops to the mission. From the first force commander, General Augusto Heleno, to the current one, Lieutenant General José Luiz Jaborandy, Jr., all MINUSTAH commanders have been Brazilian general officers.

MINUSTAH is in Haiti at the request of the local government, and it remains there to serve the best interests of Haiti. The Mission seeks to contribute to the security of the local population and help maintain democratic order. Since the arrival of the multinational force, there have been two presidential elections, and the critical humanitarian emergency following the 2010 earthquake has been overcome.

From a security stand point the Mission has been a success, especially against the gangs that operated freely in the capital, Port-au-Prince, and the areas of Belair, Cité Soleil and Cité Militaire, according to data from the UN and the Haitian government.

Born in 1958, Lt. Gen. Jaborandy holds degrees from the Brazilian Army Command and General Staff School as well as Portugal’s Institute of Advanced Military Studies. He served as a cabinet advisor to the Office of the Brazilian Army Command, as well as a military observer with the United Nations Observer Group in Central America (UNOCA) in 1991, and the United Nations Observer Mission in El Salvador (ONUSAL), in 1992.

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy graciously took time from his busy schedule as Force Commander to respond to the following questions from Diálogo
regarding the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti:

DIÁLOGO:
Do you believe that MINUSTAH functions conceptually as a collective defense unit under the aegis of the United Nations?

Lieutenant General José Luiz Jaborandy, Jr.:
Pursuant to the provisions of the United Nations Charter, MINUSTAH is in Haiti to undertake a joint effort with the international community to help Haiti, maintaining a secure and stable environment in the context of a peacekeeping mission.

DIÁLOGO:
How do you interpret the responsibility of leading the more than 5,000 troops from 21 countries that make up MINUSTAH?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
Leading troops of different nationalities is a major responsibility, but regardless of the cultural differences and the different forms of employment among the Armed Forces that are represented here, we’re all united under the brotherhood of a single flag and focused on a common goal. MINUSTAH has one of the best working environments that I have experienced in my nearly 40 years of service. I usually say, in reference to this integrated environment, that we fly many different flags but we’re one group. We’re a family, and it is a privilege and an honor to lead the men and women who make up the military component of MINUSTAH.

DIÁLOGO:
How does the interoperability between military servicemembers from so many different countries work?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
We have observed that, despite the cultural diversity, the doctrinal differences of deployment for each participating armed force, and their respective levels of training, the “United Nations standard” acts as a leveling force, providing a single standard of conduct. We adhere to several documents that regulate the deployment of the troops, such as operational concepts and rules of engagement. In the military component, we have a training unit that is responsible for providing specific instructions on standardizing the necessary procedures to perform the tasks that we have been assigned. It’s important to highlight, praise, and acknowledge the high level of preparation that the troops have shown here with MINUSTAH. The preparation occurs in their own countries prior to their deployment to Haiti. This greatly facilitates the peacekeeping Soldiers’ understanding of the mission, both individually and as a group, and it facilitates their adjustment to the specifics of the operations conducted within the context of the MINUSTAH Mandate.

Another aspect that greatly facilitates the interaction between the forces from different countries is their desire to take part in a very significant mission. This allows the servicemen and women to quickly understand the issues related to heterogeneous groups and to work in harmony, which greatly favors interoperability.

DIÁLOGO:
And what about the Haitian National Police?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
Preparation and integration of the Haitian National Police (HNP) are tasks assigned to the MINUSTAH Police Component. It is not the responsibility of the Mission’s Military Component. The United Nations Police (UNPOL), with its various branches, is continually working with the HNP. We have seen progress with the Haitian Police. Maybe not at the ideal speed, but the steps that have been taken have been positive ones. We can see the professionalization, some improvement to equipment, doctrinal development and, above all, training throughout the National Police Academy. Initially, the MINUSTAH military force worked much more isolated; now we are giving priority to joint operations and we have provided support to the HNP whenever requested.

DIÁLOGO:
What is your biggest challenge as Force Commander?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
After nearly four decades of military service, it is a real reward as a Soldier to be able to carry out this important mission as Force Commander. The biggest challenge is to keep the forces under my command in full compliance with the mandate that was conferred upon us by the UN Security Council. However, I should mention that this challenge has been easy to overcome, given the encouragement, enthusiasm and commitment of all of those who have had the honor of representing their country by working for Haiti through the United Nations.

DIÁLOGO:
You were a military observer for two UN missions in Central America in the 1990s. How has this helped in your current role?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
In the 1990s, specifically in 1991 and 1992, I had the opportunity to participate in two peacekeeping missions. The United Nations Observer Group in Central America (ONUCA) and the United Nations Observer Group in El Salvador (ONUSAL). These missions were important because they gave me an opportunity to become a part of and begin to understand the “United Nations System”. At the time, I was a young captain, but the experience that I acquired has greatly facilitated my current role as Force Commander.

DIÁLOGO:
How has the MINUSTAH Mandate changed over the last 10 years, and what is expected in the near future?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
In relation to the military component, the MINUSTAH Mandate has changed in accordance with the situations experienced by the country. At the start of the mission, the main objective was to establish and maintain security, which meant taking a stronger role. During its initial moments [in Haiti], the military component had to operate in isolation, without conducting joint operations with the UNPOL and the HNP. It was a time when the focus was on initiatives to reestablish a secure environment. As the level of security increased, that original role was adapted based on new situations.

In 2010, with the earthquake, the military component had to adapt its role to the new situation. It then began to prioritize humanitarian actions, rebuilding the country and improving the living conditions of the population – all of this without forgetting, of course, the security levels that had been attained.

Currently, the military component no longer plays a leading role. It has adopted a secondary role in support of the Haitian authorities' actions on security, developing infrastructure, humanitarian actions and improving the living conditions of its population.

In the near future, the United Nations, through Security Council Resolution 2180 of October 2014, will once again alter our role. This Resolution, which is under review until this coming March, stipulates a reduction in the number of servicemembers present. From the current authorized force of 5,021 military men and women, we will have a force of 2,370. This will significantly reduce our presence and, consequently, a new operational role will be adopted. We will operate much more as a Strategic (Rapid) Response Force, applying what we refer to as the “1-2-3 Formula”, which involves: the first response being handled by the HNP; the second response by the HNP supported by the UNPOL; and the third and final response involving the military troops. We will be concentrated in two hubs, one in Port-au-Prince and the other in Cap Haitien, with the ability to be deployed when situations become critical and the HNP, acting alongside or supported by the UNPOL, is unable to resolve them.

DIÁLOGO:
Do you consider MINUSTAH’s current role to be more or less sensitive than before?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
I consider the work achieved by MINUSTAH throughout its existence to be important. Our operations have been and continue to be very sensitive because we are legally fulfilling a UN mandate.

Now, with the reestablishment of the Rule of Law and the legal system in the country, we’re focused on continually maintaining the strict legitimacy of the deployment of troops from the military component. We’re constantly paying attention and instructing our troops on how to respond to any requests from the HNP and UNPOL.

I don’t want to say that in the past the work was more or less sensitive, more or less legal, or more or less important than it is now, but the focus and the concepts of the operations have changed, and with them, the risks inherent to each phase, so it isn’t possible to quantify which of them would be the most sensitive.

The work of MINUSTAH, at any time, has always had moments of greater or lesser sensitivity, but that was not and has not been our concern. I can assure you that we have always remained focused on fulfilling the established mandate, always within the law and seeking to act as an agent for the integration of the Haitian nation.

DIÁLOGO:
Ultimately, what is the concept of “stability” included in the definition of MINUSTAH?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
From my point of view, one cannot confuse the concepts of security and stability, even though they are interdependent. Security is the solid foundation upon which stability is built.

Based on absolute levels of violence and crime, Haiti can be considered a safe country. I understand that the work being carried out by MINUSTAH, together with the national institutions and with the will of the Haitian people, has been capable of reestablishing and maintaining security at levels that are considered compatible.

On the other hand, in order to define stability, we must extend to the strategic, political, and institutional level. We know that the country is now facing problems resulting from some political impasses that are making its progress difficult in the democratic realm.

So, from my point of view, the current situation in Haiti shows that the country has acceptable levels of security supported by UN actions, but that it is facing problems in the realm of institutional and political stability.

But I’m an optimist, and I believe that the national institutions, the government and the Haitian people will be able to find the path to stability through democratic means, where dialogue and consensus prevail.

DIÁLOGO:
In Brazil, as in other countries, there are those who criticize the work of the Armed Forces participating in peacekeeping missions, because they believe that their nations also need these military servicemembers. How would you respond to this?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
The increasing importance of Brazil on the international stage means that the country must take on new responsibilities. Brazil is one of the largest economies in the world, and its global profile is increasing. Raising a country’s profile does not take place solely by strengthening the economic area, but also the political, technological, military, and psychosocial areas. And that’s why Brazil has deployed a small portion of its Armed Forces to Haiti.

We must understand that this work is bringing benefits to our country. Through our participation in MINUSTAH, Brazil is gaining respect and demonstrating that it is not isolated from the international community. It shows that it is working towards world peace and that, even though it is still developing and has its own problems, it continues to lend a hand to its sister nations in need, bolstering its credentials as a reliable country and a peaceful nation.

I believe that our participation in MINUSTAH has allowed Brazil to show its ability to deploy forces, using its own technology, infrastructure and logistics, while also demonstrating its ability to plan and play a leading role in actions conducted within a multinational context. It has also trained its troops and conducted the operation in a balanced manner within an extremely complex and sensitive environment.

It is worth noting that the country has been able to develop, test, and share doctrines and modern military equipment. The motivation of the military personnel in fulfilling a UN mission in support of a people in need of solidarity is also of great importance. The Brazilian servicemembers within MINUSTAH return to our country better than they were when they left, more willing to show solidarity. They understand why we want world peace, and why we are taking concrete steps to seek it.

Therefore, in my estimation, Brazil’s decision to take part in this mission was appropriate.

DIÁLOGO:
Do you consider yourself a better person for having participated in this peacekeeping mission?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
Everyone who has had the opportunity to participate in a peacekeeping mission can see the gratitude in the eyes and hearts of those who welcome us for temporary assistance. Their spirit is raised and they are fulfilled as military servicemen and women and as human beings. I am very proud of the manner in which the military contingents are able to interact with the population of Haiti. Here, our Militaries have been able to reconcile the operational aspects with those of the heart. Here, we are Soldiers of peace, of solidarity; professionals who understand the mission as a way to help the people of Haiti. Here, we have evolved as men and women, raising our hearts and minds to a new level.

DIÁLOGO:
Is there anything else you would like to add?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
I would like to thank you for the opportunity for this interview. I want to say that we are happy to be in Haiti, and that the challenges do not frighten us; on the contrary, they motivate us. We’re prepared to fulfill the mission that we have taken on, and we understand how to do it. We are proud to bear our flags and represent our people by helping this country. There is no nobler task than a mission of peace.

It’s important to emphasize that those who think that the Armed Forces exist to make war are mistaken. They exist to ensure peace. That is the reason for the Armed Forces. And ensuring peace, solidarity and friendship among people, and brotherhood among nations is exactly what we’re doing here with MINUSTAH.

We will always be ready to fulfill this important mission, if we are once again called upon by our countries and by the international community in the future, even though we hope that this will not be necessary. Ideally, once and for all, all peoples will be able to join in brotherhood, to understand each other, at home and abroad, and to build the peace that all nations need in order to be truly happy.

From here, in Haiti, I’m sending out 5,021 brotherly embraces to all of those who believe and who, in some form or other, are working for peace.





The United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) was created through UN Security Council Resolution 1542 on April 30, 2004. Since then, at the invitation of the UN, Brazil has been contributing military and police troops to the mission. From the first force commander, General Augusto Heleno, to the current one, Lieutenant General José Luiz Jaborandy, Jr., all MINUSTAH commanders have been Brazilian general officers.

MINUSTAH is in Haiti at the request of the local government, and it remains there to serve the best interests of Haiti. The Mission seeks to contribute to the security of the local population and help maintain democratic order. Since the arrival of the multinational force, there have been two presidential elections, and the critical humanitarian emergency following the 2010 earthquake has been overcome.

From a security stand point the Mission has been a success, especially against the gangs that operated freely in the capital, Port-au-Prince, and the areas of Belair, Cité Soleil and Cité Militaire, according to data from the UN and the Haitian government.

Born in 1958, Lt. Gen. Jaborandy holds degrees from the Brazilian Army Command and General Staff School as well as Portugal’s Institute of Advanced Military Studies. He served as a cabinet advisor to the Office of the Brazilian Army Command, as well as a military observer with the United Nations Observer Group in Central America (UNOCA) in 1991, and the United Nations Observer Mission in El Salvador (ONUSAL), in 1992.

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy graciously took time from his busy schedule as Force Commander to respond to the following questions from Diálogo
regarding the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti:

DIÁLOGO:
Do you believe that MINUSTAH functions conceptually as a collective defense unit under the aegis of the United Nations?

Lieutenant General José Luiz Jaborandy, Jr.:
Pursuant to the provisions of the United Nations Charter, MINUSTAH is in Haiti to undertake a joint effort with the international community to help Haiti, maintaining a secure and stable environment in the context of a peacekeeping mission.

DIÁLOGO:
How do you interpret the responsibility of leading the more than 5,000 troops from 21 countries that make up MINUSTAH?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
Leading troops of different nationalities is a major responsibility, but regardless of the cultural differences and the different forms of employment among the Armed Forces that are represented here, we’re all united under the brotherhood of a single flag and focused on a common goal. MINUSTAH has one of the best working environments that I have experienced in my nearly 40 years of service. I usually say, in reference to this integrated environment, that we fly many different flags but we’re one group. We’re a family, and it is a privilege and an honor to lead the men and women who make up the military component of MINUSTAH.

DIÁLOGO:
How does the interoperability between military servicemembers from so many different countries work?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
We have observed that, despite the cultural diversity, the doctrinal differences of deployment for each participating armed force, and their respective levels of training, the “United Nations standard” acts as a leveling force, providing a single standard of conduct. We adhere to several documents that regulate the deployment of the troops, such as operational concepts and rules of engagement. In the military component, we have a training unit that is responsible for providing specific instructions on standardizing the necessary procedures to perform the tasks that we have been assigned. It’s important to highlight, praise, and acknowledge the high level of preparation that the troops have shown here with MINUSTAH. The preparation occurs in their own countries prior to their deployment to Haiti. This greatly facilitates the peacekeeping Soldiers’ understanding of the mission, both individually and as a group, and it facilitates their adjustment to the specifics of the operations conducted within the context of the MINUSTAH Mandate.

Another aspect that greatly facilitates the interaction between the forces from different countries is their desire to take part in a very significant mission. This allows the servicemen and women to quickly understand the issues related to heterogeneous groups and to work in harmony, which greatly favors interoperability.

DIÁLOGO:
And what about the Haitian National Police?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
Preparation and integration of the Haitian National Police (HNP) are tasks assigned to the MINUSTAH Police Component. It is not the responsibility of the Mission’s Military Component. The United Nations Police (UNPOL), with its various branches, is continually working with the HNP. We have seen progress with the Haitian Police. Maybe not at the ideal speed, but the steps that have been taken have been positive ones. We can see the professionalization, some improvement to equipment, doctrinal development and, above all, training throughout the National Police Academy. Initially, the MINUSTAH military force worked much more isolated; now we are giving priority to joint operations and we have provided support to the HNP whenever requested.

DIÁLOGO:
What is your biggest challenge as Force Commander?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
After nearly four decades of military service, it is a real reward as a Soldier to be able to carry out this important mission as Force Commander. The biggest challenge is to keep the forces under my command in full compliance with the mandate that was conferred upon us by the UN Security Council. However, I should mention that this challenge has been easy to overcome, given the encouragement, enthusiasm and commitment of all of those who have had the honor of representing their country by working for Haiti through the United Nations.

DIÁLOGO:
You were a military observer for two UN missions in Central America in the 1990s. How has this helped in your current role?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
In the 1990s, specifically in 1991 and 1992, I had the opportunity to participate in two peacekeeping missions. The United Nations Observer Group in Central America (ONUCA) and the United Nations Observer Group in El Salvador (ONUSAL). These missions were important because they gave me an opportunity to become a part of and begin to understand the “United Nations System”. At the time, I was a young captain, but the experience that I acquired has greatly facilitated my current role as Force Commander.

DIÁLOGO:
How has the MINUSTAH Mandate changed over the last 10 years, and what is expected in the near future?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
In relation to the military component, the MINUSTAH Mandate has changed in accordance with the situations experienced by the country. At the start of the mission, the main objective was to establish and maintain security, which meant taking a stronger role. During its initial moments [in Haiti], the military component had to operate in isolation, without conducting joint operations with the UNPOL and the HNP. It was a time when the focus was on initiatives to reestablish a secure environment. As the level of security increased, that original role was adapted based on new situations.

In 2010, with the earthquake, the military component had to adapt its role to the new situation. It then began to prioritize humanitarian actions, rebuilding the country and improving the living conditions of the population – all of this without forgetting, of course, the security levels that had been attained.

Currently, the military component no longer plays a leading role. It has adopted a secondary role in support of the Haitian authorities' actions on security, developing infrastructure, humanitarian actions and improving the living conditions of its population.

In the near future, the United Nations, through Security Council Resolution 2180 of October 2014, will once again alter our role. This Resolution, which is under review until this coming March, stipulates a reduction in the number of servicemembers present. From the current authorized force of 5,021 military men and women, we will have a force of 2,370. This will significantly reduce our presence and, consequently, a new operational role will be adopted. We will operate much more as a Strategic (Rapid) Response Force, applying what we refer to as the “1-2-3 Formula”, which involves: the first response being handled by the HNP; the second response by the HNP supported by the UNPOL; and the third and final response involving the military troops. We will be concentrated in two hubs, one in Port-au-Prince and the other in Cap Haitien, with the ability to be deployed when situations become critical and the HNP, acting alongside or supported by the UNPOL, is unable to resolve them.

DIÁLOGO:
Do you consider MINUSTAH’s current role to be more or less sensitive than before?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
I consider the work achieved by MINUSTAH throughout its existence to be important. Our operations have been and continue to be very sensitive because we are legally fulfilling a UN mandate.

Now, with the reestablishment of the Rule of Law and the legal system in the country, we’re focused on continually maintaining the strict legitimacy of the deployment of troops from the military component. We’re constantly paying attention and instructing our troops on how to respond to any requests from the HNP and UNPOL.

I don’t want to say that in the past the work was more or less sensitive, more or less legal, or more or less important than it is now, but the focus and the concepts of the operations have changed, and with them, the risks inherent to each phase, so it isn’t possible to quantify which of them would be the most sensitive.

The work of MINUSTAH, at any time, has always had moments of greater or lesser sensitivity, but that was not and has not been our concern. I can assure you that we have always remained focused on fulfilling the established mandate, always within the law and seeking to act as an agent for the integration of the Haitian nation.

DIÁLOGO:
Ultimately, what is the concept of “stability” included in the definition of MINUSTAH?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
From my point of view, one cannot confuse the concepts of security and stability, even though they are interdependent. Security is the solid foundation upon which stability is built.

Based on absolute levels of violence and crime, Haiti can be considered a safe country. I understand that the work being carried out by MINUSTAH, together with the national institutions and with the will of the Haitian people, has been capable of reestablishing and maintaining security at levels that are considered compatible.

On the other hand, in order to define stability, we must extend to the strategic, political, and institutional level. We know that the country is now facing problems resulting from some political impasses that are making its progress difficult in the democratic realm.

So, from my point of view, the current situation in Haiti shows that the country has acceptable levels of security supported by UN actions, but that it is facing problems in the realm of institutional and political stability.

But I’m an optimist, and I believe that the national institutions, the government and the Haitian people will be able to find the path to stability through democratic means, where dialogue and consensus prevail.

DIÁLOGO:
In Brazil, as in other countries, there are those who criticize the work of the Armed Forces participating in peacekeeping missions, because they believe that their nations also need these military servicemembers. How would you respond to this?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
The increasing importance of Brazil on the international stage means that the country must take on new responsibilities. Brazil is one of the largest economies in the world, and its global profile is increasing. Raising a country’s profile does not take place solely by strengthening the economic area, but also the political, technological, military, and psychosocial areas. And that’s why Brazil has deployed a small portion of its Armed Forces to Haiti.

We must understand that this work is bringing benefits to our country. Through our participation in MINUSTAH, Brazil is gaining respect and demonstrating that it is not isolated from the international community. It shows that it is working towards world peace and that, even though it is still developing and has its own problems, it continues to lend a hand to its sister nations in need, bolstering its credentials as a reliable country and a peaceful nation.

I believe that our participation in MINUSTAH has allowed Brazil to show its ability to deploy forces, using its own technology, infrastructure and logistics, while also demonstrating its ability to plan and play a leading role in actions conducted within a multinational context. It has also trained its troops and conducted the operation in a balanced manner within an extremely complex and sensitive environment.

It is worth noting that the country has been able to develop, test, and share doctrines and modern military equipment. The motivation of the military personnel in fulfilling a UN mission in support of a people in need of solidarity is also of great importance. The Brazilian servicemembers within MINUSTAH return to our country better than they were when they left, more willing to show solidarity. They understand why we want world peace, and why we are taking concrete steps to seek it.

Therefore, in my estimation, Brazil’s decision to take part in this mission was appropriate.

DIÁLOGO:
Do you consider yourself a better person for having participated in this peacekeeping mission?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
Everyone who has had the opportunity to participate in a peacekeeping mission can see the gratitude in the eyes and hearts of those who welcome us for temporary assistance. Their spirit is raised and they are fulfilled as military servicemen and women and as human beings. I am very proud of the manner in which the military contingents are able to interact with the population of Haiti. Here, our Militaries have been able to reconcile the operational aspects with those of the heart. Here, we are Soldiers of peace, of solidarity; professionals who understand the mission as a way to help the people of Haiti. Here, we have evolved as men and women, raising our hearts and minds to a new level.

DIÁLOGO:
Is there anything else you would like to add?

Lt. Gen. Jaborandy:
I would like to thank you for the opportunity for this interview. I want to say that we are happy to be in Haiti, and that the challenges do not frighten us; on the contrary, they motivate us. We’re prepared to fulfill the mission that we have taken on, and we understand how to do it. We are proud to bear our flags and represent our people by helping this country. There is no nobler task than a mission of peace.

It’s important to emphasize that those who think that the Armed Forces exist to make war are mistaken. They exist to ensure peace. That is the reason for the Armed Forces. And ensuring peace, solidarity and friendship among people, and brotherhood among nations is exactly what we’re doing here with MINUSTAH.

We will always be ready to fulfill this important mission, if we are once again called upon by our countries and by the international community in the future, even though we hope that this will not be necessary. Ideally, once and for all, all peoples will be able to join in brotherhood, to understand each other, at home and abroad, and to build the peace that all nations need in order to be truly happy.

From here, in Haiti, I’m sending out 5,021 brotherly embraces to all of those who believe and who, in some form or other, are working for peace.
"We are all united under one flag and focused on a common goal," bringing together with the military not only the noblest thing that a people can receive, peace, but also evolution as people and spirits, the humanization that had unfortunately been lost among civilizations. Excellent article showing the impeccable work being done by the Brazilian Armed Forces in Haiti!
In such a complex situation in the country, it is such a sight to know that there are still dignified Brazilians, state officials who fulfill their duty fearlessly and responsibly. They deserve all our respect and make us once again proud of our beloved, but unfortunately plundered country, Brazil. I admire the Brazilian Army for carrying out operations in the country. I would have liked if my son pursued a career like his grandfather, but he did not want to be in the military at all. I think it's a profession like any other. His grandfather was a captain in the Army after being a major. I wanted him to go in as a lieutenant. He was a physical education instructor. Unfortunately, we can't change people's minds. I love the Brazilian Army! Always ready for achievement. My warm regards to all servicemembers and war pioneers. Essentially, I believe that after painfully establishing social and legal order, where presence and face-to-face combat was irreplaceable in the initial phase, social reconstruction will be fundamental in the subsequent phases with schools, colleges, jobs, transportation, housing, hospitals, emergency services, interconnected commercial networks that use few resources, yet produce twice as much, generating prosperity, jobs and the creation of technological centers like SESC, SESI and SENAI with laboratories and research mainly focused on Haiti's needs (mainly in the first and second phases) to provide a foundation for Haitians to create their own technology. This will generate specialized labor and promote the personal progress of every citizen, which will allow families to sustain themselves and become independent, from the point of view of any foreign assistance. I also believe that the forces who have provided assistance have been impeccable from the beginning, which has fully contributed to Haiti's rapid reconstruction and autonomy. I think there are other hidden interests because it seems the citizens are being indoctrinated. There is only one island, and we are not separate nations! We need the Army under its commander to free all Brazilians from the thievery that we're plainly experiencing, and which nothing is being done about. Only the military can save us. Every time I hear on the news about the peace missions that our servicemembers are called upon to participate, for example in Haiti, I feel proud of the Brazilian Army and understand the practice of the motto: "Brazilian Army, strong arm, friendly hand." May God almighty, omniscient and omnipresent bless you Gen. Jaborandy and all your men.
Pr AS Barrero, Methodist. I had the pleasure of meeting Captain Jaborandy in the UNCA and UNSAL missions in Central America in 1900/91/92. I was the Colonel in the Venezuela component. He is an excellent professional who
honors Brazil and its Armed Forces. Oddly, the "Sao Paulo Forum," an umbrella organization for several left-wing groups, requested the withdrawal
of MINUSTAH to finish the "liberation of Haiti". ?? During the 2010 earthquake, not as a member of the military, I was in Haiti collaborating in the coordination of Minustah and Southcom in the Joint Operations Center. I must remind you that Brazil and other countries suffered great losses when the MINUSTAH headquarters was demolished. What a good interview! I had the honor of being a member of the Argentine contingent deployed in Haiti in July, 2013, and I can assure you that having lived through it, I was no longer the same person, since from now on I will be a soldier for peace! General Jaborandy, grand commandant, man, and soldier of peace. A military leader who knew how to unite matters of the heart and of the life of a soldier. His leadership is missed, and his example will always echo in the hearts and minds of those who had the opportunity to be his companions along the journey.
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