Salvadoran and Chilean MINUSTAH Soldiers Cooperate to Help Haitians

Salvadoran and Chilean MINUSTAH Soldiers Cooperate to Help Haitians

By Dialogo
April 28, 2015






Troops from the Salvadoran Armed Forces (FAES) and the Chilean Armed Forces (FACh) recently cooperated to provide food staples and school desks to needy children in Haiti.

On March 23, El Salvador's SALCON IV contingent and the 22nd Chile Battalion provided food to children who live at the Valdocco Foundation's home in the city of Cap Haïtien, in Haiti's North Department. During the visit, they gave caregivers at the orphanage bleached flour, cooking oil, soy sauce, salt, potatoes, liquid and powdered milk, and potable water for preparing meals for the children, most of whom were left homeless after the major earthquake that devastated the country in 2010.

“This assistance is part of the peacekeeping efforts and the support for the Haitian community that both armies give in the framework of the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH),” explained Lieutenant Colonel Abelardo Zaldaña Montecino, SALCON IV Commanding Officer.

These items will feed about 40 children – orphans and indigent young people – in the foundation’s home, which serves breakfast, lunch, a mid-afternoon snack, and dinner to 150 children in a public dining room.

“The children receive academic and sports workshops. Also, they can gain a basic knowledge of trades such as carpentry, crafts or family farming," said Natoux Mackendy, who manages the orphanage. "Therefore, the assistance that the Blue Helmets (UN peacekeepers) provide is invaluable to keep these homeless children properly fed." The Valdocco Foundation provides an educational workshop to 80 children.

To support educational efforts, on April 10 Troops from El Salvador and Chile also delivered desks and school supplies to the National Boys School, located in Cap Haïtien. Principal Jean Verne Lebrun thanked the Salvadoran and Chilean Armed Forces for their gifts, and emphasized that the items would greatly benefit their 105 students.

“The Blue Helmets brought us 35 desks and school supplies such as colored pencils and coloring books. We are grateful because, without a doubt, these will be very beneficial to the children’s motor skills development,” Verne Lebrun said.

Overall, SALCON IV and the 12th Chile Battalion have delivered more than 200 student desks to eight educational centers in Cap Haïtien.

“MINUSTAH’s mission still does not have an end date, even though the United Nations (UN) has told the militaries that the intention is to gradually reduce the number of service members in Haiti,” Salvadoran Minister of Defense, Maj. Gen. Munguía Payés said.

Troops work together to provide humanitarian support


Providing food and school supplies are just two instances of the ongoing effort by Salvadoran and Chilean peacekeeping Troops to help the civilian population of Haiti.

“Our contingent conducts patrols, supports centers and schools, and provides basic medical treatment in devastated communities," Maj. Gen. Munguía Payés explained. "We work side-by-side with the Chilean Army to reduce the needs of our Haitian brothers and sisters.”

Part of that mission is to provide security and other services during Haiti's upcoming presidential and legislative elections, said Vice Admiral Julio Leiva, FACh Commander of Naval Operations. Elections for the Chamber of Deputies and two-thirds of the Senate are scheduled for August 9, and the presidential election is scheduled for October 25.

“It is a tremendous responsibility for our institution, and in particular for our contingent now deployed there; the fact that there will be presidential and legislative elections during that time will present an additional challenge,” Vice Admiral Leiva said.

New Troops prepare to serve in MINUSTAH


The Armed Forces peacekeepers from El Salvador and Chile will continue to help the civilian population for however long they are deployed in Haiti. Both countries have already prepared new contingents of peacekeeping Troops who will relieve those currently supporting the security and public education of Haitians.

On April 4 the Chilean Armed Forces deployed the twenty-third group of officers who will join the Chile Battalion, comprised of about 400 service members. Those being deployed to Haiti include a Navy petty officer, three female Army officers and four non-commissioned officers. One of the female service members is striving to be a role model for other female Troops.

“I hope to be a source of motivation for women in the units and in general; I hope to help meet the needs of the people and our platoon,” said Petty Officer First Class Jannett Bernal, from the Viña del Mar Naval Hospital, who will deploy to Haiti as chief of the healthcare team.

Likewise, the FAES deployed a fresh contingent of service members on April 23. Lieutenant Colonel Velial Casco Roque will serve as the Commanding Officer for the 34 members of SALCON V who will take on security duties in educational facilities, and conduct foot and motor patrols in support of the civilian population beginning in May.







Troops from the Salvadoran Armed Forces (FAES) and the Chilean Armed Forces (FACh) recently cooperated to provide food staples and school desks to needy children in Haiti.

On March 23, El Salvador's SALCON IV contingent and the 22nd Chile Battalion provided food to children who live at the Valdocco Foundation's home in the city of Cap Haïtien, in Haiti's North Department. During the visit, they gave caregivers at the orphanage bleached flour, cooking oil, soy sauce, salt, potatoes, liquid and powdered milk, and potable water for preparing meals for the children, most of whom were left homeless after the major earthquake that devastated the country in 2010.

“This assistance is part of the peacekeeping efforts and the support for the Haitian community that both armies give in the framework of the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH),” explained Lieutenant Colonel Abelardo Zaldaña Montecino, SALCON IV Commanding Officer.

These items will feed about 40 children – orphans and indigent young people – in the foundation’s home, which serves breakfast, lunch, a mid-afternoon snack, and dinner to 150 children in a public dining room.

“The children receive academic and sports workshops. Also, they can gain a basic knowledge of trades such as carpentry, crafts or family farming," said Natoux Mackendy, who manages the orphanage. "Therefore, the assistance that the Blue Helmets (UN peacekeepers) provide is invaluable to keep these homeless children properly fed." The Valdocco Foundation provides an educational workshop to 80 children.

To support educational efforts, on April 10 Troops from El Salvador and Chile also delivered desks and school supplies to the National Boys School, located in Cap Haïtien. Principal Jean Verne Lebrun thanked the Salvadoran and Chilean Armed Forces for their gifts, and emphasized that the items would greatly benefit their 105 students.

“The Blue Helmets brought us 35 desks and school supplies such as colored pencils and coloring books. We are grateful because, without a doubt, these will be very beneficial to the children’s motor skills development,” Verne Lebrun said.

Overall, SALCON IV and the 12th Chile Battalion have delivered more than 200 student desks to eight educational centers in Cap Haïtien.

“MINUSTAH’s mission still does not have an end date, even though the United Nations (UN) has told the militaries that the intention is to gradually reduce the number of service members in Haiti,” Salvadoran Minister of Defense, Maj. Gen. Munguía Payés said.

Troops work together to provide humanitarian support


Providing food and school supplies are just two instances of the ongoing effort by Salvadoran and Chilean peacekeeping Troops to help the civilian population of Haiti.

“Our contingent conducts patrols, supports centers and schools, and provides basic medical treatment in devastated communities," Maj. Gen. Munguía Payés explained. "We work side-by-side with the Chilean Army to reduce the needs of our Haitian brothers and sisters.”

Part of that mission is to provide security and other services during Haiti's upcoming presidential and legislative elections, said Vice Admiral Julio Leiva, FACh Commander of Naval Operations. Elections for the Chamber of Deputies and two-thirds of the Senate are scheduled for August 9, and the presidential election is scheduled for October 25.

“It is a tremendous responsibility for our institution, and in particular for our contingent now deployed there; the fact that there will be presidential and legislative elections during that time will present an additional challenge,” Vice Admiral Leiva said.

New Troops prepare to serve in MINUSTAH


The Armed Forces peacekeepers from El Salvador and Chile will continue to help the civilian population for however long they are deployed in Haiti. Both countries have already prepared new contingents of peacekeeping Troops who will relieve those currently supporting the security and public education of Haitians.

On April 4 the Chilean Armed Forces deployed the twenty-third group of officers who will join the Chile Battalion, comprised of about 400 service members. Those being deployed to Haiti include a Navy petty officer, three female Army officers and four non-commissioned officers. One of the female service members is striving to be a role model for other female Troops.

“I hope to be a source of motivation for women in the units and in general; I hope to help meet the needs of the people and our platoon,” said Petty Officer First Class Jannett Bernal, from the Viña del Mar Naval Hospital, who will deploy to Haiti as chief of the healthcare team.

Likewise, the FAES deployed a fresh contingent of service members on April 23. Lieutenant Colonel Velial Casco Roque will serve as the Commanding Officer for the 34 members of SALCON V who will take on security duties in educational facilities, and conduct foot and motor patrols in support of the civilian population beginning in May.


The Alliance for Prosperity needs to go hand-in-hand with respect and a guarantee of the sovereignty of the different nations. Otherwise, it's an ambush of free countries who love the freedom and national sovereignty of each and every one of the countries. WE HAVE TO DESACTIVATE CRIME IT IS UNJUST TO SEE SO MANY CHILDREN WHO NEED HELP AND LOTS OF AFFECTION. IT WOULD BE BETTER IF SOME FAMILIES WOULD ADOPT THEM, GIVE THEM HOME LIKE AFFECTION. I AM ALREADY AN ELDERLY LADY, I BROUGHT UP MY THREE CHILDREN. OTHERWISE, I WOULD BE THE FIRST TO ADOPT. HAVE A BIT OF HEART AND LOVE. that's good HAITI stopped being a country, if it ever was one, after 2004 when J.B. Aristide was removed from the presidency for a second time and the "country" was under the control of international armed forces and then, until today, under the United Nations which sends troops that other nations volunteer to provide for humanitarian aid and to keep the peace. I think that sustaining this methodology for an indefinite time is to unnecessarily prolong the problem those poor people have. Someone should take charge of Haiti politically and reorganize it somehow under their own protection and control. Maybe the U.S. Who, if not them? And incorporate it directly as a new state. No more empty euphemisms and silliness like "Yankee imperialism" and rubbish of this sort. So, turn them into doctors? What a good idea. But they need to be adopted first, to be able to take care of them then educate them so they become doctors.
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