Peru Builds a Sail Training Vessel, Marks a Resurgence in its Naval Industry

Peru Builds a Sail Training Vessel, Marks a Resurgence in its Naval Industry

By Dialogo
November 28, 2014





The launch of the sail training vessel Unión
on December 22 – a ship built by Servicios Industriales de la Marina (SIMA) – marks the historic resurgence of Peru’s naval industry.

“For the Peruvian Navy, this event constitutes the end of a road that we have been on for more than 100 years, to give this country a sail training vessel for our future sailors,” said Captain Carlos Raygada Liveratto, chief of industrial services on the Callao coast.

In South America, only Perú, Paraguay and Bolivia lack this type of vessel. But now, the dream of the Peruvian Navy’s dream has become a reality, thanks to the construction of what is considered the largest sail training vessel in Latin America. It will have a total length of 115.5 meters, 2.4 meters longer than Chile’s Esmeralda
, which is currently the largest such vessel in the region.

The Unión
will be a teaching ship to train naval cadets and students from the Peruvian Navy’s various training schools. It will also play a part role in the Peruvian government’s foreign policy for the Peruvian government as a “traveling Embassy” that will visit different countries, conduct scientific research, and participate in humanitarian aid in the event of a natural disaster.

“The main objective of this ship is to be a platform for training and pre-professional practicums for our cadets and students, as well as a place to familiarize them with planning, astronomical and kinematic navigation techniques,” said Capt. Raygada.

The best training happens on sailing vessels, in the traditional way that sailors in the Navy learned to master ships and life on the high seas, said Raygada.

Made in Perú


The ship’s construction began in December 2012 and cost 161.5 million soles (US$55 million). All of the construction work was performed at the naval shipyard at the port of Callao, involving about 800 Peruvian professionals and technicians.

The fact that the Unión
is being completely built completely in Perú is the most tangible demonstration that the country is ramping up its naval industry, said President Ollanta Humala.

“We have a reactivation plan for SIMA, we want it to go international, to partner with the largest shipyards in the world, and to work together to build a modern, competitive and efficient naval industry,” said Humala in 2012 when work began on the Unión
. On that opportunity, he also announced an investment of US$75 million to strengthen the Peruvian Navy.

SIMA has been in operation for over 60 years, and it has been given a boost by the current Peruvian administration, which has focused primarily on supporting the modernization of the Peruvian Navy’s infrastructure and equipment.

“Construction of the Unión
has historical significance for SIMA, because after 25 years, we are renewing our construction of tall ships, which allows us to improve the growth and development of the naval industry in our country, in addition to becoming a highly competitive company that creates jobs, a demand for goods and services, and added value for Peruvian exports,” said Captain Carlos Raygada.

To date, this has led to the construction of 36 of the 39 modules components of the ship. The only items left are those that will be placed on the upper part of the ship, such as the masts. Additionally, inside the components, 90% of the equipment has already been installed in the machine room, including engines, electric generators and air conditioning units.

“The 250 officers and cadets that will sail aboard the Unión
will have the most modern and efficient training,” said Minister of Defense Pedro Cateriano.

It will depart on its first mission to Peru’s scientific station in Antarctica. In October 2015, it will depart on its first mission, to Antarctica, where Perú maintains a science station.




The launch of the sail training vessel Unión
on December 22 – a ship built by Servicios Industriales de la Marina (SIMA) – marks the historic resurgence of Peru’s naval industry.

“For the Peruvian Navy, this event constitutes the end of a road that we have been on for more than 100 years, to give this country a sail training vessel for our future sailors,” said Captain Carlos Raygada Liveratto, chief of industrial services on the Callao coast.

In South America, only Perú, Paraguay and Bolivia lack this type of vessel. But now, the dream of the Peruvian Navy’s dream has become a reality, thanks to the construction of what is considered the largest sail training vessel in Latin America. It will have a total length of 115.5 meters, 2.4 meters longer than Chile’s Esmeralda
, which is currently the largest such vessel in the region.

The Unión
will be a teaching ship to train naval cadets and students from the Peruvian Navy’s various training schools. It will also play a part role in the Peruvian government’s foreign policy for the Peruvian government as a “traveling Embassy” that will visit different countries, conduct scientific research, and participate in humanitarian aid in the event of a natural disaster.

“The main objective of this ship is to be a platform for training and pre-professional practicums for our cadets and students, as well as a place to familiarize them with planning, astronomical and kinematic navigation techniques,” said Capt. Raygada.

The best training happens on sailing vessels, in the traditional way that sailors in the Navy learned to master ships and life on the high seas, said Raygada.

Made in Perú


The ship’s construction began in December 2012 and cost 161.5 million soles (US$55 million). All of the construction work was performed at the naval shipyard at the port of Callao, involving about 800 Peruvian professionals and technicians.

The fact that the Unión
is being completely built completely in Perú is the most tangible demonstration that the country is ramping up its naval industry, said President Ollanta Humala.

“We have a reactivation plan for SIMA, we want it to go international, to partner with the largest shipyards in the world, and to work together to build a modern, competitive and efficient naval industry,” said Humala in 2012 when work began on the Unión
. On that opportunity, he also announced an investment of US$75 million to strengthen the Peruvian Navy.

SIMA has been in operation for over 60 years, and it has been given a boost by the current Peruvian administration, which has focused primarily on supporting the modernization of the Peruvian Navy’s infrastructure and equipment.

“Construction of the Unión
has historical significance for SIMA, because after 25 years, we are renewing our construction of tall ships, which allows us to improve the growth and development of the naval industry in our country, in addition to becoming a highly competitive company that creates jobs, a demand for goods and services, and added value for Peruvian exports,” said Captain Carlos Raygada.

To date, this has led to the construction of 36 of the 39 modules components of the ship. The only items left are those that will be placed on the upper part of the ship, such as the masts. Additionally, inside the components, 90% of the equipment has already been installed in the machine room, including engines, electric generators and air conditioning units.

“The 250 officers and cadets that will sail aboard the Unión
will have the most modern and efficient training,” said Minister of Defense Pedro Cateriano.

It will depart on its first mission to Peru’s scientific station in Antarctica. In October 2015, it will depart on its first mission, to Antarctica, where Perú maintains a science station.
Congratulations SIMAC. Having retired from MGP, I am delighted by the achievements made by my institution. BZ. from abroad.
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