Honduras Defense University Offers Students a Quality Education

Honduras Defense University Offers Students a Quality Education

By Dialogo
March 24, 2015






This year, Honduras Defense University celebrates 10 years of providing members of the Honduran Armed Forces access to a top-notch Military university education for undergraduate and graduate students.

“For parents, UDH (Universidad de Defensa de Honduras) offers their children the best levels of education, with zero failures in class," according to Rear Adm. Romero Burgos. "Our youth receives quality education and the assurance that they are immersed in a process to be educated with a view to serving their country, and this service will be with great dignity, knowing that there is sacrifice, but there is much more honor in serving one’s country.”

In addition to providing post-graduate courses, UDH also allows young people who are joining the Military the opportunity to pursue a college education. Every October, the latter take UDH’s admissions exam for a place in its classes, and hundreds are admitted every year. For example, on January 11, the university admitted 412 young Cadets between the ages of 16 and 22; of these, 156 were accepted at the College of Military Sciences; 146 at the College of Naval Sciences; and 110 at the College of Aeronautical Sciences.

Students at each of these schools have the opportunity to study a wide array of courses related to the Armed Forces. The College of Military Sciences offers majors in Communications, War Materials, Intelligence, Artillery, and Engineering. Aeronautical Sciences offers majors in Military Piloting, Air Defense, and Logistics. And Naval Sciences offers Communications, General Studies, and Maritime Engineering. In addition, Cadet candidates from any of the academies may pursue a bachelor’s degree in Military Mechatronic Engineering or Military Nursing.

Education helps the Military improve its technology


All of these courses help the Armed Forces prepare students to meet the Military's technological challenges. For instance, every five years, UDH graduates a group of Cadets in Mechatronic Engineering who will be responsible for developing various projects. In 2016, UDH is expected to graduate 22 mechatronics students from the three academies.

“Mechatronic engineering has arisen from the need for high technology that the military air, ground, and sea forces now have," according to Rear Adm. Romero. "The requirements are greater and greater, and we need qualified people.”

After graduation, these students will join the Armed Forces Research and Development Institute to work on a variety of automation projects, including efforts to produce ammunition, buoys, and security systems.

For instance, one such project involves the development of an automated buoy that will allow users to establish control points with more rigorous technological support throughout Honduran waters. The prototype will include cameras and a radar system, and will offer the ability to verify whether a ship or underwater vessel is inside Honduran waters. In addition, the cameras will identify the type of ship that has entered Honduran waters, and will obtain real-time information about the vessel.

“The advantage of these devices will be that a control tower will be able to record the information provided, and even if the buoys are destroyed, the evidence will remain secure in the tower’s virtual storage,” said Colonel Manuel Antonio Peraza Rivera, UDH's vice rector for academics.

Providing higher education to young Cadet candidates


UDH is a pioneer in university-level Military education in Central America, according to UDH rector Rear Admiral Ramón Cristóbal Romero Burgos; it’s also part of the country’s university system, which consists of 20 universities, including 14 private and six public institutions. The university is public, and civilians are allowed to attend the university for graduate work.

“Before UDH was created, people who began a Military career found themselves in a difficult situation where the studies they had completed were not recognized at the university level, or they had to attend domestic or foreign universities to complete a university degree that normally had nothing to do with their Military careers.”

The education offered by UDH is one of the reasons that a high percentage of the officers in the Honduran Armed Forces has a college degree. Currently, 99 percent of the officers in the Honduran Military have at least an undergraduate degree; of those, 60 percent also have a master’s degree, according to Rear Adm. Romero. In the near future, UDH plans to create a doctorate program in Defense and Security, which would be a requirement for service members' promotion to general officers.





This year, Honduras Defense University celebrates 10 years of providing members of the Honduran Armed Forces access to a top-notch Military university education for undergraduate and graduate students.

“For parents, UDH (Universidad de Defensa de Honduras) offers their children the best levels of education, with zero failures in class," according to Rear Adm. Romero Burgos. "Our youth receives quality education and the assurance that they are immersed in a process to be educated with a view to serving their country, and this service will be with great dignity, knowing that there is sacrifice, but there is much more honor in serving one’s country.”

In addition to providing post-graduate courses, UDH also allows young people who are joining the Military the opportunity to pursue a college education. Every October, the latter take UDH’s admissions exam for a place in its classes, and hundreds are admitted every year. For example, on January 11, the university admitted 412 young Cadets between the ages of 16 and 22; of these, 156 were accepted at the College of Military Sciences; 146 at the College of Naval Sciences; and 110 at the College of Aeronautical Sciences.

Students at each of these schools have the opportunity to study a wide array of courses related to the Armed Forces. The College of Military Sciences offers majors in Communications, War Materials, Intelligence, Artillery, and Engineering. Aeronautical Sciences offers majors in Military Piloting, Air Defense, and Logistics. And Naval Sciences offers Communications, General Studies, and Maritime Engineering. In addition, Cadet candidates from any of the academies may pursue a bachelor’s degree in Military Mechatronic Engineering or Military Nursing.

Education helps the Military improve its technology


All of these courses help the Armed Forces prepare students to meet the Military's technological challenges. For instance, every five years, UDH graduates a group of Cadets in Mechatronic Engineering who will be responsible for developing various projects. In 2016, UDH is expected to graduate 22 mechatronics students from the three academies.

“Mechatronic engineering has arisen from the need for high technology that the military air, ground, and sea forces now have," according to Rear Adm. Romero. "The requirements are greater and greater, and we need qualified people.”

After graduation, these students will join the Armed Forces Research and Development Institute to work on a variety of automation projects, including efforts to produce ammunition, buoys, and security systems.

For instance, one such project involves the development of an automated buoy that will allow users to establish control points with more rigorous technological support throughout Honduran waters. The prototype will include cameras and a radar system, and will offer the ability to verify whether a ship or underwater vessel is inside Honduran waters. In addition, the cameras will identify the type of ship that has entered Honduran waters, and will obtain real-time information about the vessel.

“The advantage of these devices will be that a control tower will be able to record the information provided, and even if the buoys are destroyed, the evidence will remain secure in the tower’s virtual storage,” said Colonel Manuel Antonio Peraza Rivera, UDH's vice rector for academics.

Providing higher education to young Cadet candidates


UDH is a pioneer in university-level Military education in Central America, according to UDH rector Rear Admiral Ramón Cristóbal Romero Burgos; it’s also part of the country’s university system, which consists of 20 universities, including 14 private and six public institutions. The university is public, and civilians are allowed to attend the university for graduate work.

“Before UDH was created, people who began a Military career found themselves in a difficult situation where the studies they had completed were not recognized at the university level, or they had to attend domestic or foreign universities to complete a university degree that normally had nothing to do with their Military careers.”

The education offered by UDH is one of the reasons that a high percentage of the officers in the Honduran Armed Forces has a college degree. Currently, 99 percent of the officers in the Honduran Military have at least an undergraduate degree; of those, 60 percent also have a master’s degree, according to Rear Adm. Romero. In the near future, UDH plans to create a doctorate program in Defense and Security, which would be a requirement for service members' promotion to general officers.
THE DEATHS APRIL 17, 18, 19, 2015 Hi, the information is very interesting, but I just want to know is it for cadets? Or what do I have to do to be able to get into the UDH. I am currently study nursing at the UNAH, but because of financially issues, I would like to find a place I could serve and continue to study. I await information from you. Thank you very much When are the entrance exams and what are the requirements or where is there more information. Hi, I would like to know what the requirements are to be able to join and when are the exams. Good afternoon, I would like to know if there are distance learning or virtual courses for the staff in other countries. I appreciate any information that could be provided. Hi I would like to study for a nursing license but as a civilian where can I go for information
Share