Guatemalan military police arrive in Haiti to participate in MINUSTAH

Guatemalan military police arrive in Haiti to participate in MINUSTAH

By Dialogo
November 13, 2014




Guatemala recently sent a fresh group of military police agents to Haiti to help the United Nations Stabilization Mission’s (MINUSTAH) efforts.

The contingent, which arrived in Haiti on October 14, is relieving a team of officers who was in the Caribbean country for nine months.. They are scheduled to stay in the country for nine months. Among the 133 security personnel are seven senior officers, 17 junior officers, 38 support specialists, six translators, and 65 military police agents.

“With this action, the government is displaying a strategic institution with highly-trained staff," said Francisco Jimenez, coordinator of the Security and Justice Program at Interpeace, located in Guatemala.

While they are in Haiti, the Guatemalan Military Police officers will help provide security for the civilian population -- a task which includes planning crime-prevention activities, helping to control civil disturbances, and directing traffic.

International Aid to Haiti



MINUSTAH is a cooperative UN effort to provide security and stability to Haiti launched in 2004. The mission’s mandate was originally scheduled to expire in October 2012; but in 2010, UN authorities extended it after the 7.0-magnitude earthquake which struck the country that year. The disaster killed about 160,000 people and destroyed or severely damaged 250,000 homes and 30,000 commercial buildings. The mission is comprised of 7,000 military personnel from more than a dozen countries, including Argentina
, Bolivia
, Brazil
, Canada
, Chile
, Colombia
, Croatia
, El Salvador
, the United States,
the Philippines
, France
, Guatemala
, Italy
, Jordan, Nepal, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Sri Lanka, and Uruguay.

"International aid in Haiti has created conditions of stability and security in the country. The presence of the UN multinational force in the country is still important," said Jimenez.

Guatemala also helping stabilize the Congo



Guatemala international contributions to public safety are not limited to Haiti.

In May, Guatemala sent a contingent of Special Forces troops to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) to help in the United Nations Mission in the Congo (MONUSCO). The Guatemalan mission will remain in the DRC for nine months. The group is comprised of 150 members, including officers, specialists, and soldiers, six of whom are women, according to a statement issued by the Guatemalan Army.

"The goal of the mission is to protect civilians, humanitarian workers, and defenders of human rights who are in imminent danger of physical violence and to support the Government of the Congo in its initiatives to stabilize the country and consolidate peace," the statement said.

Since 2000, the UN has maintained some 19,000 military personnel, 391 police officers, and 760 international observers in the DRC, according to the official website of the Guatemalan federal government.

Other countries contributing military personnel to the mission are Algeria, Belgium, Bolivia, France, Russia, and Uruguay.



Guatemala recently sent a fresh group of military police agents to Haiti to help the United Nations Stabilization Mission’s (MINUSTAH) efforts.

The contingent, which arrived in Haiti on October 14, is relieving a team of officers who was in the Caribbean country for nine months.. They are scheduled to stay in the country for nine months. Among the 133 security personnel are seven senior officers, 17 junior officers, 38 support specialists, six translators, and 65 military police agents.

“With this action, the government is displaying a strategic institution with highly-trained staff," said Francisco Jimenez, coordinator of the Security and Justice Program at Interpeace, located in Guatemala.

While they are in Haiti, the Guatemalan Military Police officers will help provide security for the civilian population -- a task which includes planning crime-prevention activities, helping to control civil disturbances, and directing traffic.

International Aid to Haiti



MINUSTAH is a cooperative UN effort to provide security and stability to Haiti launched in 2004. The mission’s mandate was originally scheduled to expire in October 2012; but in 2010, UN authorities extended it after the 7.0-magnitude earthquake which struck the country that year. The disaster killed about 160,000 people and destroyed or severely damaged 250,000 homes and 30,000 commercial buildings. The mission is comprised of 7,000 military personnel from more than a dozen countries, including Argentina
, Bolivia
, Brazil
, Canada
, Chile
, Colombia
, Croatia
, El Salvador
, the United States,
the Philippines
, France
, Guatemala
, Italy
, Jordan, Nepal, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Sri Lanka, and Uruguay.

"International aid in Haiti has created conditions of stability and security in the country. The presence of the UN multinational force in the country is still important," said Jimenez.

Guatemala also helping stabilize the Congo



Guatemala international contributions to public safety are not limited to Haiti.

In May, Guatemala sent a contingent of Special Forces troops to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) to help in the United Nations Mission in the Congo (MONUSCO). The Guatemalan mission will remain in the DRC for nine months. The group is comprised of 150 members, including officers, specialists, and soldiers, six of whom are women, according to a statement issued by the Guatemalan Army.

"The goal of the mission is to protect civilians, humanitarian workers, and defenders of human rights who are in imminent danger of physical violence and to support the Government of the Congo in its initiatives to stabilize the country and consolidate peace," the statement said.

Since 2000, the UN has maintained some 19,000 military personnel, 391 police officers, and 760 international observers in the DRC, according to the official website of the Guatemalan federal government.

Other countries contributing military personnel to the mission are Algeria, Belgium, Bolivia, France, Russia, and Uruguay.
The Guatemalan army does a lot with what little it has. More interest in the army is needed Very good excellent what is being done, in addition to doing exercises they take care of the nation GOD says if he isn't watching over the city the guard does so in vain. Therefore no matter how hard they try if GOD is ignored, any mission will fail. The nation's best
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