Colombian Military Trains Armed Forces throughout the World

Colombian Military Trains Armed Forces throughout the World

By Dialogo
January 29, 2015





In recent years, more than 60 countries around the world have benefitted from training with the Colombian Armed Forces.

The Colombian Military has earned a world-wide reputation for its effectiveness in fighting terrorist groups like the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the National Liberation Army (ELN), and criminal gangs, amassing vast experience in conducting counter terrorism operations, effective methods of gathering intelligence, anti-kidnapping tactics, and mounting effective demobilization campaigns with the support of the U.S. Armed Forces, which helped train and build their capacities over time.

So it is not surprising that countries facing similar challenges regularly call upon Colombia’s Armed Forces to provide their know-how and lessons learned when designing training programs for their Military and police forces.

Between 2010 and 2014, the Armed Forces of Colombia have assisted in training about 20,000 Soldiers and police officers from 63 nations, including El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Spain, Italy, and Afghanistan, thanks to cooperation agreements between the countries.

Soldiers from Colombia have provided insight to their specialties: the best ways to conduct counter-terrorism and anti-kidnaping operations, and how to combat transnational crimes, among others.

Defense officials laud the Colombian Military


The Colombian Military has the depth of experience and knowledge to help security forces throughout the world thanks to cooperation agreements they themselves have sustained with partner nations like the United States, which in turn, allow other countries to benefit from their experience and knowledge.

For example, following an October 10, 2014, meeting with United States Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel at the Tolemaida Fort, Colombian Defense Minister Juan Carlos Pinzón suggested that Colombia could contribute to the international fight against the radical Islamist group ISIS by training Coalition Troops.

The Colombian Military has also lent their assistance in training Spanish security forces on the best ways to dismantle improvised explosive devices (IEDs); demining methods; how to conduct interdictions at sea and on other waterways; counter-terrorism operations; and the most effective tactics for conducting rescues in combat zones.

International cooperation is crucial in the battle against transnational criminal organizations.

“In today’s world, where crime is an international concern, our countries must work together for stability, and Colombia serves as an example of rarely seen persistence and seriousness,” said Admiral Juan Francisco Martínez, Spain’s director of Defense Policy during a visit to Colombia in May 2014. “Spain admires characteristics such as the abilities the Armed Forces have developed in the fight against terrorism,” Martínez said. “There are tons of things that could be of use to us, and useful to Colombia,” he added.

In another example, last October, Pinzón participated in the Tswalu Dialogue in South Africa, where he met with global security experts and learned that several African countries intend to adopt the Colombian Armed Forces’ methods of fighting drug trafficking and terrorism.

Contributions of the Junglas Command


The Military is not the only Colombian security force to provide training to other countries.

Every year, the Junglas Command of the Colombian National Police trains dozens of new officers from throughout the world in its drug enforcement program.

The Junglas Command is a specialized group within the Colombian Drug Enforcement Police whose mission is to conduct a frontal assault on drug trafficking, as well as to offer training internationally.

Since 1989, the Junglas have trained approximately 1,600 police officers from countries including Perú, Bolivia, Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, Honduras, Costa Rica, Panamá, Brazil, Argentina, Afghanistan, and México, according to the Section Commander of the Junglas Company, Wilson Forero.

They provide training that focuses on the “planning, preparation, execution and evaluation of operations on interdictions, location and destruction of coca processing laboratories, destruction of landing strips and high-value objects, in any topographical area,” according to Forero.

In May, the Junglas will offer its Fifteenth International Course, to be attended by 80 students, including 50 from the Colombian National Police, and 30 from other countries.




In recent years, more than 60 countries around the world have benefitted from training with the Colombian Armed Forces.

The Colombian Military has earned a world-wide reputation for its effectiveness in fighting terrorist groups like the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the National Liberation Army (ELN), and criminal gangs, amassing vast experience in conducting counter terrorism operations, effective methods of gathering intelligence, anti-kidnapping tactics, and mounting effective demobilization campaigns with the support of the U.S. Armed Forces, which helped train and build their capacities over time.

So it is not surprising that countries facing similar challenges regularly call upon Colombia’s Armed Forces to provide their know-how and lessons learned when designing training programs for their Military and police forces.

Between 2010 and 2014, the Armed Forces of Colombia have assisted in training about 20,000 Soldiers and police officers from 63 nations, including El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Spain, Italy, and Afghanistan, thanks to cooperation agreements between the countries.

Soldiers from Colombia have provided insight to their specialties: the best ways to conduct counter-terrorism and anti-kidnaping operations, and how to combat transnational crimes, among others.

Defense officials laud the Colombian Military


The Colombian Military has the depth of experience and knowledge to help security forces throughout the world thanks to cooperation agreements they themselves have sustained with partner nations like the United States, which in turn, allow other countries to benefit from their experience and knowledge.

For example, following an October 10, 2014, meeting with United States Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel at the Tolemaida Fort, Colombian Defense Minister Juan Carlos Pinzón suggested that Colombia could contribute to the international fight against the radical Islamist group ISIS by training Coalition Troops.

The Colombian Military has also lent their assistance in training Spanish security forces on the best ways to dismantle improvised explosive devices (IEDs); demining methods; how to conduct interdictions at sea and on other waterways; counter-terrorism operations; and the most effective tactics for conducting rescues in combat zones.

International cooperation is crucial in the battle against transnational criminal organizations.

“In today’s world, where crime is an international concern, our countries must work together for stability, and Colombia serves as an example of rarely seen persistence and seriousness,” said Admiral Juan Francisco Martínez, Spain’s director of Defense Policy during a visit to Colombia in May 2014. “Spain admires characteristics such as the abilities the Armed Forces have developed in the fight against terrorism,” Martínez said. “There are tons of things that could be of use to us, and useful to Colombia,” he added.

In another example, last October, Pinzón participated in the Tswalu Dialogue in South Africa, where he met with global security experts and learned that several African countries intend to adopt the Colombian Armed Forces’ methods of fighting drug trafficking and terrorism.

Contributions of the Junglas Command


The Military is not the only Colombian security force to provide training to other countries.

Every year, the Junglas Command of the Colombian National Police trains dozens of new officers from throughout the world in its drug enforcement program.

The Junglas Command is a specialized group within the Colombian Drug Enforcement Police whose mission is to conduct a frontal assault on drug trafficking, as well as to offer training internationally.

Since 1989, the Junglas have trained approximately 1,600 police officers from countries including Perú, Bolivia, Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, Honduras, Costa Rica, Panamá, Brazil, Argentina, Afghanistan, and México, according to the Section Commander of the Junglas Company, Wilson Forero.

They provide training that focuses on the “planning, preparation, execution and evaluation of operations on interdictions, location and destruction of coca processing laboratories, destruction of landing strips and high-value objects, in any topographical area,” according to Forero.

In May, the Junglas will offer its Fifteenth International Course, to be attended by 80 students, including 50 from the Colombian National Police, and 30 from other countries.
They must be training the competition, to the point of coming out with weaponry in front of their superiors and nothing happens, like what goes on in Pereira Very good articles of interest on the presence and progress of terrorism all over the world. I congratulate you. Very good. Keep it up. The Colombian Armed Forces have the best experience in this 60 years of combat in the jungle and regions apt for ambush which cost them 870 deaths, against several guerrilla groups such as the FARC, ELN, UP, PARAMILITARIES, M-19 and others, trained by Cubans, Vietnamese, Russians, narco guerrillas other left-wing governments such as Venezuela, Ecuador and others. The army has kept is morale and ability to fight, adding to the experience in Korea, where it fought with a Colombian battalion, performing excellently, deserving praise from the American generals and receiving the U.S. Congressional Star. The war has been very difficult given the lack of collaboration from some presidents in the past who did not want an all-out fight, just enough to keep them at arm's length. In Latin America other armies are very disciplined in their parades, but they're backyard barracks armies who have nothing else to do. Morale during combat is where an army's ability can be seen, for the "archer" special forces of Colombia, the word impossible does not exist"
increase professional I just happened to find this magazine. I am already subscribed and I have been reviewing the excellent articles for four hours. As a currently retired Venezuelan Colonel, I served in the U.N. in Central America and the west Sahara, and during the Haitian earthquake of 2010 also, non-military mission. I have had the honor and the pleasure to work with officers from our sister republic of Colombia, and they are excellent professionals of arms. Onward! Everything is fine with your article. But I have not seen any news or comments on the latest killings of the Qom in the northern region of our country. They are also our brothers and no one is organizing marches as if to say "we are all in this together..." for each one of them who is killed to take away their lands. How long will we be subject to so much impunity?
Please, I ask you to inform the whole country, as you do with the Nisman, Lola or other people's cases which also deserve to be known what happened to them.
Sincerely,
María del Carmen Gori the armed forces are our guarantee. Keep it up The truth is, when I read this article, I want to cry, because I am Argentine and it hurts me profoundly that a pseudo LEFT wing government (with the workers' money) has emptied the country and mainly the army, which was considered to be among the best in the Americas and there is nothing left. Now that I'm 80 years old, I have to continue to put up with these corrupt Peronist traitors. Thanks to a people who settle for crumbs while they (the pseudo Peronists) fill their treasury with gold. Maria del Carmen Gori, you are an educated person, (a teacher), therefore you should know that what you comment is not the army's fault, rather the lady who governs the country's fault, who talks a lot about human rights but does nothing about them. She is the ONLY PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR EVERYTHING THAT HAPPENS TO US IN ARGENTINA, STARTING WITH HOW WE ARE DIVIDED. : YOO, AGUSTIN The Armed Forces are the pride of the nation. Well, the police are very good. My congratulations to the Brazilian Army, Brazilian police. They really do need to be well prepared. I approve of the command of the state police (PM) and Armed Forces of Brazil. Oh, how I miss it. I would like to be part of this group, or family, [because] that is how I see the servicemembers in our country, Brazil, and all who are honest. Higher salaries are also needed for this group. It's terrific I am an officer with the Secretariat of the Mexican Navy and I would like to take the jungle commando course next year, 2016, but where can I get information, I went to the Colombian Embassy in Mexico and they told me they would ask about the dates of the course. But I haven't had an answer, and my institution is asking me for the exact dates of the course to be able to process my application
Share