Chilean Navy hosts Exponaval 2014 , conducts maritime anti-piracy exercise

Chilean Navy hosts Exponaval 2014 , conducts maritime anti-piracy exercise

By Dialogo
December 08, 2014




The Chilean Navy recently hosted the International Naval and Maritime Exhibition and Conference for Latin America, or Exponaval 2014, and a conference for the maritime industry.

From December 2-5, more than 140 officials from Latin American -- as well as navies and defense industry representatives from around the world -- gathered for the biennial Exponaval, which focused the themes of maximizing energy efficiency and protecting the environment.

Chilean President Michelle Bachelet opened the ninth session of the exposition, which also hosted the fourth Maritime Port Industry Exhibition for Latin America, Trans-Port 2014, at the Viña del Mar Air and Naval Base in the Concón commune. That ceremony was also attended by Chilean Defense Minister Jorge Burgos; Adm. Enrique Larrañaga, commander of the Chilean Navy, and the leaders of navies from Ecuador, Portugal, Canada, and the United Kingdom.

Chile’s Ministry of Defense has organized the Exponaval and Trans-Port since their inception, in 1998 and 2008, respectively.

The defense industry displays maritime technology


Between the two conferences, 32 naval delegations met and reinforced their cooperative ties. At the maritime conference, defense industry officials displayed the latest naval technology developed by companies in the United States, Europe, and Asia.

“An event like this allows us to gain knowledge of technology in a tangible way, providing a favorable space for professionals in the maritime and defense industries so they can share their knowledge,” said Larrañaga.

During the maritime conference and Exponaval 2014, officials from shipyards presented advanced designs for war ships, civilian vessels, and submarines. Aeronautical companies, weapons systems manufacturers, and firms that produce communications and electronics systems for gathering intelligence and ensuring navigation security also displayed their products.

The main innovations on display at Exponaval 2014 included quieter naval vessel engines, which use fuel that contains fewer contaminants and produce high levels of energy. Submarine manufacturers displayed submersibles which are harder to detect than previous generations of submarines. Shipbuilding officials also displayed new merchant vessels that are more efficient in shipping containers than their predecessors, Exponaval 2014 Director Carlos Parada Meyer told the website Infodensa
in a December 1 report.

Seeking energy efficiency


Navies and private maritime companies in Latin America are seeking energy-efficient vessels to help protect the environment.

During the Exponaval 2014 conference, Chilean Minister of Energy Máximo Pacheco Matte spoke of “the energy efficiency measures that several nations are adopting, in the case of the maritime industry with the goal of introducing a fuel consumption savings of nearly 30 percent, through the growing use of liquid natural gas (LNG) as a profitable substitute for petroleum.” He made his remarks at a conference titled “The Challenges of Energy Efficiency and the Environment for Navies and the Maritime Industry.”

Improving energy efficiency is cost effective and helps protect the environment.

“Even though it is sometimes expensive to implement standards aimed at preventing pollution from ships, some measures can contribute to savings, such as in the case of energy efficiency,” said Edmund Hughes, a presenter from the Marine Environment Division of the International Maritime Organization (IMO).

Naval interdiction exercise


In addition to presentations on improving energy efficiency, Exponaval 2014 also featured naval exercises.

For example, on December 4 more than 10 Chilean Navy ships participated in a maritime interdiction exercise against piracy at Bahía de Valparaíso. The naval vessels also engaged in a pollution control exercise. During the simulation, the Chilean Navy captured a group of petroleum pirates, and assumed control of the ship they had taken over. The Board and Search Group from the Chilean Army (GARA) also participated in the exercise.

“This type of exercise conducted by the Navy is a sample of the capabilities we have reached in the operation of oceanic patrol ships to combat pirating, terrorism and drug trafficking,” said Chilean Capt. Daniel Coca, chief of the Naval Training Center.

The maneuvers also included simulated a medical airlift of wounded patients. Crews from the OPV Piloto Pardo
and the oil tanker Arauco
participated in the training exercise. Chilean military forces also deployed go-fast boats, sailors on jet skis and inflatable rafts, and two helicopters.

New vessels under construction


In addition to conducting military exercises, the government of Chile announced the construction of a ship to be used in the Antarctic region and a floating wharf.

“Our goal is to have a ship with the capabilities necessary to conduct all operations in the Antarctic, including a renewed capability to perform scientific research,” said President Bachelet.

The new Antarctic ship being constructed will replace the icebreaker Almirante Oscar Viel
which is nearing the end of its useful life. It was built in 1969 by the Canadian Navy and acquired by Chile in 1994.

The Chilean government is also building a new maritime zone patrol vessel that will strengthen its capabilities to protect Chile’s exclusive economic zone. Additionally, authorities have also initiated feasibility studies for a new dike, the third from the Navy Shipyards and Armory (ASMAR), which would meet the maintenance needs of Post Panamax ships in the South Eastern Pacific.

“The goal for Latin American navies is to integrate security matters with traditional naval matters,” said Navarro.



The Chilean Navy recently hosted the International Naval and Maritime Exhibition and Conference for Latin America, or Exponaval 2014, and a conference for the maritime industry.

From December 2-5, more than 140 officials from Latin American -- as well as navies and defense industry representatives from around the world -- gathered for the biennial Exponaval, which focused the themes of maximizing energy efficiency and protecting the environment.

Chilean President Michelle Bachelet opened the ninth session of the exposition, which also hosted the fourth Maritime Port Industry Exhibition for Latin America, Trans-Port 2014, at the Viña del Mar Air and Naval Base in the Concón commune. That ceremony was also attended by Chilean Defense Minister Jorge Burgos; Adm. Enrique Larrañaga, commander of the Chilean Navy, and the leaders of navies from Ecuador, Portugal, Canada, and the United Kingdom.

Chile’s Ministry of Defense has organized the Exponaval and Trans-Port since their inception, in 1998 and 2008, respectively.

The defense industry displays maritime technology


Between the two conferences, 32 naval delegations met and reinforced their cooperative ties. At the maritime conference, defense industry officials displayed the latest naval technology developed by companies in the United States, Europe, and Asia.

“An event like this allows us to gain knowledge of technology in a tangible way, providing a favorable space for professionals in the maritime and defense industries so they can share their knowledge,” said Larrañaga.

During the maritime conference and Exponaval 2014, officials from shipyards presented advanced designs for war ships, civilian vessels, and submarines. Aeronautical companies, weapons systems manufacturers, and firms that produce communications and electronics systems for gathering intelligence and ensuring navigation security also displayed their products.

The main innovations on display at Exponaval 2014 included quieter naval vessel engines, which use fuel that contains fewer contaminants and produce high levels of energy. Submarine manufacturers displayed submersibles which are harder to detect than previous generations of submarines. Shipbuilding officials also displayed new merchant vessels that are more efficient in shipping containers than their predecessors, Exponaval 2014 Director Carlos Parada Meyer told the website Infodensa
in a December 1 report.

Seeking energy efficiency


Navies and private maritime companies in Latin America are seeking energy-efficient vessels to help protect the environment.

During the Exponaval 2014 conference, Chilean Minister of Energy Máximo Pacheco Matte spoke of “the energy efficiency measures that several nations are adopting, in the case of the maritime industry with the goal of introducing a fuel consumption savings of nearly 30 percent, through the growing use of liquid natural gas (LNG) as a profitable substitute for petroleum.” He made his remarks at a conference titled “The Challenges of Energy Efficiency and the Environment for Navies and the Maritime Industry.”

Improving energy efficiency is cost effective and helps protect the environment.

“Even though it is sometimes expensive to implement standards aimed at preventing pollution from ships, some measures can contribute to savings, such as in the case of energy efficiency,” said Edmund Hughes, a presenter from the Marine Environment Division of the International Maritime Organization (IMO).

Naval interdiction exercise


In addition to presentations on improving energy efficiency, Exponaval 2014 also featured naval exercises.

For example, on December 4 more than 10 Chilean Navy ships participated in a maritime interdiction exercise against piracy at Bahía de Valparaíso. The naval vessels also engaged in a pollution control exercise. During the simulation, the Chilean Navy captured a group of petroleum pirates, and assumed control of the ship they had taken over. The Board and Search Group from the Chilean Army (GARA) also participated in the exercise.

“This type of exercise conducted by the Navy is a sample of the capabilities we have reached in the operation of oceanic patrol ships to combat pirating, terrorism and drug trafficking,” said Chilean Capt. Daniel Coca, chief of the Naval Training Center.

The maneuvers also included simulated a medical airlift of wounded patients. Crews from the OPV Piloto Pardo
and the oil tanker Arauco
participated in the training exercise. Chilean military forces also deployed go-fast boats, sailors on jet skis and inflatable rafts, and two helicopters.

New vessels under construction


In addition to conducting military exercises, the government of Chile announced the construction of a ship to be used in the Antarctic region and a floating wharf.

“Our goal is to have a ship with the capabilities necessary to conduct all operations in the Antarctic, including a renewed capability to perform scientific research,” said President Bachelet.

The new Antarctic ship being constructed will replace the icebreaker Almirante Oscar Viel
which is nearing the end of its useful life. It was built in 1969 by the Canadian Navy and acquired by Chile in 1994.

The Chilean government is also building a new maritime zone patrol vessel that will strengthen its capabilities to protect Chile’s exclusive economic zone. Additionally, authorities have also initiated feasibility studies for a new dike, the third from the Navy Shipyards and Armory (ASMAR), which would meet the maintenance needs of Post Panamax ships in the South Eastern Pacific.

“The goal for Latin American navies is to integrate security matters with traditional naval matters,” said Navarro.
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