Chilean Air Force Completes First Flight Piloted Solely by Women

Chilean Air Force Completes First Flight Piloted Solely by Women

By Carolina Contreras/Diálogo
September 18, 2017

Hasta cuándo lo diré en todos los sitios que puedo ?, no entiendo cómo los Sres. periodistas estudian tanto para cometer semejantes errores por falta de acuciosidad y conocimientos; según la Real Academia Española (RAE), Pilotear significa instalar pilotes, operar, conducir o manejar un automóvil , buque o aeronave, se dice Pilotar. Dejen de dar pena y confundir a los lectores por favor. No entiendo cómo los periodistas, que estudian tanto, cometen este tipo de errores por falta de acuciosidad o de conocimientos. Según la Real Academia Española (RAE), Pilotear significa hincar pilotes; operar, manejar o conducir un automóvil, buque o aeronave, se dice Pilotar. No confundan a la gente gente por favor Hola. No existe Capitana ni en las FFAA de Chile ser les dice así. Cuan me contenta y emociona que séndas mujeres hoy se destaquen por hacer una faena que solo hombres desempeñaban y es que la mujer ya no solamente es la costilla del hombre, tambien su ayudante incondicional y felicitaciones a La >Real Fuerza Aérea Chilena por hacer del sexo " Débil" un séxo fuerte. On July 14th, two officers from the Chilean Air Force (FACh, per its Spanish acronym) completed the first flight flown solely by women. The flight crew included FACh Captain Viviana Lillo as the flight captain and FACh Captain Dagny Cubillos as co-pilot. The Boeing 737 departed from the runway at the FACh’s 10th Air Group in Santiago, headed for Puerto Montt in southern Chile. This historic voyage, led by the first graduating class of female officers with a specialization in flying heavy aircraft, logged 1,032 kilometers in a flight time of 160 minutes. “It was doubly satisfying, personally and professionally, to be on the team of this first female crew,” Capt. Lillo told Diálogo. “Also because it was my first flight as captain of an aircraft.” “Making history as a member of FACh’s first female flight was a great honor,” Capt. Cubillos told Diálogo. “We had always flown with male flight captains, so this trip was special.” The Boeing 737 is a 36-meter long, jet-propelled airplane manufactured in the United States. It is capable of transporting 118 passengers and is classified as a heavy aircraft intended for transporting passengers and cargo. For FACh, it serves the mission of being the presidential airplane. It also conducts community support missions during emergencies, natural disasters, and the transfer of patients and organs, among other uses. Training to break down barriers Women first entered FACh in 2000. That same year, then Cadet Lillo entered the institution with the dream of becoming a transport pilot. “I wanted to contribute to my country through my work and help people in the community,” she said. She graduated from the academy in 2003 and began the instrument course on trainer planes such as the Pillán. Later came tactical training as well as her specialization in transport, combat, and helicopter aircraft. Afterwards, she started gaining experience as a co-pilot on different types of missions in smaller planes such as the Twin Otter, which has a 12-person capacity. “Thanks to the rigorous training, you achieve a level of autonomy, and you get the tools needed to face these kinds of challenges,” Capt. Lillo explained. She joined FACh’s 10th Air Group in 2010 and began her specialization on the Boeing 737, which culminated in 2017 when she became the nation’s first female captain of a heavy transport flight. “My example is a way of showing women that we have no limits,” Capt. Lillo said. “We can advance in our lives and develop ourselves the same way that our male colleagues do.” Her fantasy of flying and her interest in the military led Capt. Cubillos to make a professional career of FACh, beginning 15 years ago. She has devoted the last three years to flying the Boeing 737. Still in training to become a flight captain, this co-pilot of the first female flight noted that the institution that she represents has always given her the same opportunities as her male colleagues. “Through hard work and much rigor, we are showing that we have the same capabilities,” she said. “There are no major differences.” An easy trip At the Operations Department of FACh’s 10th Air Group, a request was received for a flight to Puerto Montt on July 14th, to transfer military personnel. It was assigned to the two female pilots. At that moment, they put everything they had learned to the test. “We are not immune to mishaps, and that’s why we have to be very diligent in these duties,” Capt. Lillo said. “This is teamwork, not just us two pilots. There is a group of professionals for each flight.” “We followed all of the security steps and weather checks in order to have an easy flight and a soft landing. And it worked out,” Capt. Cubillos explained. “The condition of the aircraft, the conditions along the route and at the destination are some of the parameters that you have to study and control.” Flight hours are a key requirement for the cabin crew. In this case, they must complete a minimum of 400 hours in the plane they specialized on (the 737 model), and 900 hours in other medium-size planes. For both officers, who are also experienced in peacekeeping, rescue, and Antarctic missions, even though these trips require the same rigor, some are more meaningful than others. Flights to support the community – such as those made in order to transfer organs and patients, especially children – are the most relevant to them. Also meaningful to them are flights to assist with fighting fires such as the ones that impacted central and southern Chile in February 2017, when personnel were transferred to fight the fires. “The thanks we get from people we’ve helped in different places across the country makes this work meaningful,” Capt. Cubillos concluded.
Share