Caribbean Senior Police Officers Trained in Hostage Negotiation Tactics

Caribbean Senior Police Officers Trained in Hostage Negotiation Tactics

By Dialogo
May 20, 2015




Defense and Police Forces from across the Caribbean region have received hostage negotiation training to address security threats against their nations.

The Regional Security System (RSS) held the Training Institute’s five-day Hostage Negotiation Course in Barbados starting on April 13th, with participants from five member states: Grenada, Barbados, St. Kitts and Nevis, Antigua and Barbuda, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Seventeen participants earned certifications at the course, which covered topics such as suicide intervention, active listening skills, crisis negotiation, the use of third-party intermediaries and the tactical role of negotiators.

Authorities prepare to fight terrorism


Barbados Attorney General Adriel Brathwaite delivered the keynote address at the closing ceremony on April 17. Terrorist groups such as ISIS could come to the Caribbean, and law enforcement authorities must prepare to deal with them, he said. "Some may say such events are not relevant to us, but the world is coming closer . . . [and] it is our responsibility to make sure we are ahead of the curve."

Because the Caribbean is heavily dependent on tourism, the region could suffer great economic damage from a terrorist attack. Brathwaite encouraged the participants to share the skills they learned with their colleagues and build relationships with the relevant agencies involved in the fight against terrorism.

It is possible that the Islamic terrorist organization, which controls territory in Iraq and Syria, operates in Libya and Nigeria, and has affiliates in Southeast Asia, could target the Caribbean for an attack.

“The preparation and international cooperation are important to fight against terrorist organizations and organized crime,” said Armando Rodríguez Luna, a security analyst at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). “Should members of ISIS come to operate in any of the Caribbean countries, they could affect the tourism industry; possibly the main activity would be to kidnap tourists to pressure European countries and perhaps United States. This would be a blow for the safety and economy of these countries.”

The Caribbean countries have previously made some inroads in the fight against terrorism, the analyst said.

“These countries already share lists of potential members of terrorist groups or people who are part of ISIS.”





Defense and Police Forces from across the Caribbean region have received hostage negotiation training to address security threats against their nations.

The Regional Security System (RSS) held the Training Institute’s five-day Hostage Negotiation Course in Barbados starting on April 13th, with participants from five member states: Grenada, Barbados, St. Kitts and Nevis, Antigua and Barbuda, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Seventeen participants earned certifications at the course, which covered topics such as suicide intervention, active listening skills, crisis negotiation, the use of third-party intermediaries and the tactical role of negotiators.

Authorities prepare to fight terrorism


Barbados Attorney General Adriel Brathwaite delivered the keynote address at the closing ceremony on April 17. Terrorist groups such as ISIS could come to the Caribbean, and law enforcement authorities must prepare to deal with them, he said. "Some may say such events are not relevant to us, but the world is coming closer . . . [and] it is our responsibility to make sure we are ahead of the curve."

Because the Caribbean is heavily dependent on tourism, the region could suffer great economic damage from a terrorist attack. Brathwaite encouraged the participants to share the skills they learned with their colleagues and build relationships with the relevant agencies involved in the fight against terrorism.

It is possible that the Islamic terrorist organization, which controls territory in Iraq and Syria, operates in Libya and Nigeria, and has affiliates in Southeast Asia, could target the Caribbean for an attack.

“The preparation and international cooperation are important to fight against terrorist organizations and organized crime,” said Armando Rodríguez Luna, a security analyst at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). “Should members of ISIS come to operate in any of the Caribbean countries, they could affect the tourism industry; possibly the main activity would be to kidnap tourists to pressure European countries and perhaps United States. This would be a blow for the safety and economy of these countries.”

The Caribbean countries have previously made some inroads in the fight against terrorism, the analyst said.

“These countries already share lists of potential members of terrorist groups or people who are part of ISIS.”


Absolutely! Regardless of the country's size or importance, it must be prepared for the threat of TERRORISM because it is worldwide and doesn't choose a place or nationality. It is important to be prepared with current doctrines, LP techniques and technologies.
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