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Brazilian and Uruguayan Air Forces Conduct Exercise to Combat Illegal Border Traffic

Brazilian and Uruguayan Air Forces Conduct Exercise to Combat Illegal Border Traffic

By Dialogo
May 10, 2011

A coordinated effort among countries was needed relative to illegal traffic, since this makes control easier. With the intensity that this activity acquires, it is difficult for countries to have any sucess working in isolation. I hope that other countries join this great endeavor.
Between April 25th and 29th, military personnel from the Brazilian Air Force (FAB) and the Uruguayan Air Force (FAU) conducted the URUBRA I exercise. This was the first time that Uruguay took part in the exercise, which has been conducted annually with the Air Forces of Argentina, Paraguay, Peru, Colombia and Venezuela, countries with which Brazil shares extensive borders, where illegal traffic by small aircraft, commonly linked to international drug trafficking, is constantly being identified.

For URUBRA I, the Brazilian Air Force used A-29 Super Toucan planes from the 3rd Squadron of the 3rd Aviation Group (Arrow Squadron) as the aircraft responsible for intercepting simulated traffic entering Brazilian territory from Uruguay.

As target aircraft, the FAB used C-98 Grand Caravans, one of the aircraft belonging to the 5th Air Transport Squadron. The Brazilian air operations were headquartered at Santa Maria Air Base.

The Uruguayan Air Force used A-37 Dragonfly, PC-7 Pilatus, and IA-58 Pucará aircraft belonging to the squadrons of the 2nd Air Brigade, headquartered at Durazno Air Base, as interceptor fighters and Cessna 206s from the Liaison Squadron as target planes.

The purpose of the exercise was to practice procedures enabling greater effectiveness in combating transnational illicit traffic, by means of operational coordination between the Brazilian Aerospace Defense Command and the Uruguayan Air Operations Command, involving means of command, control, and communications from both countries and the establishment of a common operational doctrine for the tasks of surveillance and control of the binational airspace, as well as practice in executing airspace policing measures.



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