Submersible Seized in Colombia

A submersible capable of carrying 8 tons of cocaine was seized by Colombian National Navy units, with the support of the Technical Investigative Corps, in an estuary of the Guandipa River, in a jungle area in the department of Nariño.
WRITER-ID | 27 June 2012

The submersible, approximately 20 meters long and 4 meters wide, was found in a jungle area of the Guandipa River, in the department of Nariño. (Photo: Colombian National Navy)

A submersible capable of carrying 8 tons of cocaine was seized by Colombian National Navy units, with the support of the Technical Investigative Corps, in an estuary of the Guandipa River, in a jungle area in the department of Nariño.

Units of the Drug Trafficking Task Force located the submersible, approximately 20 meters long and 4 meters wide, amid the vegetation along a channel of the Guandipa River.

The vessel is made from fiberglass and is capable of sailing autonomously at the waterline, for which reason it does not submerge entirely. Its propulsion system consists of two diesel motors, and it incorporates new stealth forms in order to reduce radar detection.

The construction costs of this vessel are estimated at around 1 million dollars.

The submersible, which apparently belonged to the “Los Rastrojos” [The Stubble] criminal gang, will be transported to ARC Málaga Naval Base.

This is the second submersible seized by units assigned to the Drug Trafficking Task Force in 2012, after an unmanned submersible was found in the waters of the Cajambre River, approximately 65 kilometers from Buenaventura, on May 28.

The Colombian Pacific continues to be the most widely used region by drug traffickers for the creation of improvised workshops where these illegal vessels are manufactured, due to its marshy areas with constant rain, low tides that enable the production and storage of drugs, and high tides that facilitate the departure of the vessels.

Since 1993, when the first seizure of a submersible used by drug traffickers was recorded, 77 illegal vessels have been neutralized, 60 of them in the Colombian Pacific, two of which were fully submersible vessels that could sail entirely under water.

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