Dominican Republic Dismantles International Network of Drug Traffickers

A drug-trafficking ring that sent narcotics to Puerto Rico has been dismantled by the National Drug Control Directorate (DNCD), which arrested 29 people, including five from Puerto Rico and 17 from Russia, the latter of which were crew members of a vessel used to transport prohibited substances to other countries.
WRITER-ID | 10 February 2012

The National Drug Control Directorate of the Dominican Republic confiscated 122 kilos of cocaine and arrested 29 individuals who transported cocaine to other countries. (Photo: National Drug Control Directorate/Dominican Republic)

A drug-trafficking ring that sent narcotics to Puerto Rico has been dismantled by the National Drug Control Directorate (DNCD), which arrested 29 people, including five from Puerto Rico and 17 from Russia, the latter of which were crew members of a vessel used to transport prohibited substances to other countries.

The network was made up of Puerto Rican, Dominican, and Colombian nationals who received shipments of cocaine from South America for their subsequent transport to Puerto Rico and, probably, to U.S. cities, according to Major General Rolando Rosado Mateo, head of the DNCD.

The agency head said that the arrests were made during what he identified as “Operation Earthquake,” and was the responsibility of the Sensitive Investigations Tactical Division, an elite unit that maintains an ongoing exchange of information with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) in order to track and unravel drug-trafficking networks that use the Dominican Republic as a transit corridor for shipping cocaine and heroin to the United States.

Tracking this group enabled the identification of two villas in the resort of Casa de Campo, used for their operations, one valued at slightly over 20 million dollars and another in which 122 kilos of cocaine were found destined to be transported to the vessel Carib Visión.

“This network was dedicated to receiving drugs from South America, especially from Colombia, in order to store them in the eastern region, and once there, they sent them to Puerto Rico. They used the money from those transactions to buy properties worth millions, especially villas and apartments,” Rosado Mateo said.

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