Weapons Stockpile Used for Training by Los Zetas Seized in Northern Mexico

By Dialogo
June 13, 2011


Mexican military personnel found a weapons stockpile of 204 long guns, used by Los Zetas to train personnel, hidden in a truck in a municipality in the state of Coahuila (in northern Mexico), on the border with the United States, the Secretariat of the Navy announced.

The stockpile was made up of “204 long guns, 11 handguns, 29,621 useable cartridges of various calibers, and 778 ammunition clips for firearms of various calibers, as well as fifteen hand grenades and two 40-mm grenades,” said José Luis Vergara, a spokesperson for the Mexican Secretariat of the Navy.

The arms were discovered when the military personnel stopped a vehicle carrying five men who had weapons and military-style camouflage uniforms with them, in the municipality of Villa Unión, 70 km from the border with the United States, Vergara indicated.

The men, between eighteen and thirty-three years old, confessed to working for the Los Zetas cartel, a criminal organization created by military deserters that is responsible for multiple murders in several Mexican states.

The detainees also confessed that a truck in which they were keeping weapons was near an abandoned house and hidden in the underbrush, while the weapons “were presumably used for training personnel belonging to the Los Zetas criminal organization in that area,” Vergara explained.

Another stockpile of 157 rifles and a rocket launcher was found buried last week in another municipality in Coahuila’s neighboring state of Tamaulipas (in northeastern Mexico), a stronghold of Los Zetas, where they are engaged in a bloody war against the Gulf cartel, with thousands of dead.

More than 102,000 handguns and high-powered rifles have been seized by the Mexican authorities in a little over four years, according to official figures.

Mexico is experiencing an unceasing wave of violence due to clashes among drug traffickers and law-enforcement operatives, with a toll of least 37,000 homicides since December 2006.



Very good…! This is news of public interest!
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