U.S. Thanks Guatemala for Extradition of Alleged Narco-trafficker Waldemar Lorenzana Cordón

By Dialogo
November 17, 2014



The Guatemalan government extradited Waldemar Lorenzana Cordón
to the U.S. on November 13 to face international narco-trafficking charges in Washington, D.C., with the gratitude of the U.S. Justice Department.

“The department appreciates the assistance provided by the government of Guatemala,” Assistant Attorney General Leslie R. Caldwell announced in a press release.

Guatemalan security forces captured Lorenzana Cordón in September 2013. Guatemalan and U.S.security forces suspect he is the leader of an international drug trafficking organization that works with the Sinaloa Cartel, a Mexican transnational criminal organization. The U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Asset Control (OFAC) designated Lorenzana Cordón
as a Specially Designated Narcotics Trafficker (SDNT) pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act on April 27, 2010, and a U.S. federal grand jury has indicted him for allegedly conspiring to import cocaine into the U.S..

Before security forces captured him, Lorenzana Cordón allegedly directed an enterprise that smuggled multi-ton shipments of Colombian cocaine into Mexico and the U.S. between 1996-2012. Drug traffickers used go-fast boats to transport millions of dollars’ worth of the cocaine to El Salvador, and from there they moved the contraband into Guatemala, Mexico and finally the U.S.

Guatemalan Public Ministry agents and National Civil Police (PNC) officers captured Lorenzana Cordón's father, Waldemar Lorenzana Lima, in April 2011, and extradited him to the U.S. in March. He pleaded guilty on August 18 to conspiring to import more than 450 kilograms of Colombian cocaine into the United States.

He is known as “The Patriarch.” Guatemalan law enforcement officials extradited The Patriarch to the U.S. in March.

The Patriarch, faces a mandatory minimum five years in prison to a maximum of 40 years behind bars. His sentencing date hasn't been scheduled.

“For years, members of the Lorenzana family smuggled cocaine to the United States with impunity,” Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Acting Special Agent in Charge Robert Patterson said after Lorenzana Lima entered his plea.

Son of Sinaloa Cartel leader arrested in Culiacán


Mexican Army soldiers have captured Ismael Zambada Imperial, the son of Sinaloa Cartel boss Ismael “El Mayo” Zambada, according to the Mexico's Attorney General's office.

Zambada Imperial - also known as “El Mayito Grande” – was taken into custody on November 12 while inside a home in Culiacán, the state capital of Sinaloa. Mexican law enforcement officials are holding El Mayito Grande in Mexico City.

At the time of his capture, El Mayito Grande was allegedly playing a prominent role for the Sinaloa Cartel, which is regarded as one of the world's most powerful narco-trafficking groups. He took over as the kingpin of the Sinaloa Cartel in February, after Mexican security forces captured longtime leader Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán in Mazatlán.

Security forces in Mexico and in the U.S. have captured three of El Mayo’s sons since 2009.

In November 2013, security forces in the U.S. state of Arizona captured one of El Mayo’s sons, Serafin Zambada Ortiz. He pleaded guilty in federal court on September 26 to conspiring to import cocaine and marijuana into the U.S. There, admitting that he tried to purchase more than 1,000 kilograms of cocaine and 1,000 kilograms of marijuana in Culiacán with the intent to sell them in California. Under the terms of his plea agreement, Zambada Ortiz is facing a mandatory minimum of 10 years behind bars to a maximum of life in prison, along with a $10 million fine (USD). He is scheduled to be sentenced on May 22, 2015.

Four years earlier, in 2009, Federal Police agents arrested Jesús Vicente Zambada Niebla, another of El Mayo’s sons, in Mexico City. He was extradited to the U.S. the following year. In April, Zambada Niebla pleaded guilty in federal court in Chicago to one count of conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute cocaine and heroin between 2005 and 2008 as part of a plea deal before U.S. District Chief Judge Ruben Castillo.

The conspiracy involved the distribution of “multiple” tons of cocaine during that period, with hundreds of kilograms distributed on monthly or weekly, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). His sentencing date hasn’t been announced.


The Guatemalan government extradited Waldemar Lorenzana Cordón
to the U.S. on November 13 to face international narco-trafficking charges in Washington, D.C., with the gratitude of the U.S. Justice Department.

“The department appreciates the assistance provided by the government of Guatemala,” Assistant Attorney General Leslie R. Caldwell announced in a press release.

Guatemalan security forces captured Lorenzana Cordón in September 2013. Guatemalan and U.S.security forces suspect he is the leader of an international drug trafficking organization that works with the Sinaloa Cartel, a Mexican transnational criminal organization. The U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Asset Control (OFAC) designated Lorenzana Cordón
as a Specially Designated Narcotics Trafficker (SDNT) pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act on April 27, 2010, and a U.S. federal grand jury has indicted him for allegedly conspiring to import cocaine into the U.S..

Before security forces captured him, Lorenzana Cordón allegedly directed an enterprise that smuggled multi-ton shipments of Colombian cocaine into Mexico and the U.S. between 1996-2012. Drug traffickers used go-fast boats to transport millions of dollars’ worth of the cocaine to El Salvador, and from there they moved the contraband into Guatemala, Mexico and finally the U.S.

Guatemalan Public Ministry agents and National Civil Police (PNC) officers captured Lorenzana Cordón's father, Waldemar Lorenzana Lima, in April 2011, and extradited him to the U.S. in March. He pleaded guilty on August 18 to conspiring to import more than 450 kilograms of Colombian cocaine into the United States.

He is known as “The Patriarch.” Guatemalan law enforcement officials extradited The Patriarch to the U.S. in March.

The Patriarch, faces a mandatory minimum five years in prison to a maximum of 40 years behind bars. His sentencing date hasn't been scheduled.

“For years, members of the Lorenzana family smuggled cocaine to the United States with impunity,” Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Acting Special Agent in Charge Robert Patterson said after Lorenzana Lima entered his plea.

Son of Sinaloa Cartel leader arrested in Culiacán


Mexican Army soldiers have captured Ismael Zambada Imperial, the son of Sinaloa Cartel boss Ismael “El Mayo” Zambada, according to the Mexico's Attorney General's office.

Zambada Imperial - also known as “El Mayito Grande” – was taken into custody on November 12 while inside a home in Culiacán, the state capital of Sinaloa. Mexican law enforcement officials are holding El Mayito Grande in Mexico City.

At the time of his capture, El Mayito Grande was allegedly playing a prominent role for the Sinaloa Cartel, which is regarded as one of the world's most powerful narco-trafficking groups. He took over as the kingpin of the Sinaloa Cartel in February, after Mexican security forces captured longtime leader Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán in Mazatlán.

Security forces in Mexico and in the U.S. have captured three of El Mayo’s sons since 2009.

In November 2013, security forces in the U.S. state of Arizona captured one of El Mayo’s sons, Serafin Zambada Ortiz. He pleaded guilty in federal court on September 26 to conspiring to import cocaine and marijuana into the U.S. There, admitting that he tried to purchase more than 1,000 kilograms of cocaine and 1,000 kilograms of marijuana in Culiacán with the intent to sell them in California. Under the terms of his plea agreement, Zambada Ortiz is facing a mandatory minimum of 10 years behind bars to a maximum of life in prison, along with a $10 million fine (USD). He is scheduled to be sentenced on May 22, 2015.

Four years earlier, in 2009, Federal Police agents arrested Jesús Vicente Zambada Niebla, another of El Mayo’s sons, in Mexico City. He was extradited to the U.S. the following year. In April, Zambada Niebla pleaded guilty in federal court in Chicago to one count of conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute cocaine and heroin between 2005 and 2008 as part of a plea deal before U.S. District Chief Judge Ruben Castillo.

The conspiracy involved the distribution of “multiple” tons of cocaine during that period, with hundreds of kilograms distributed on monthly or weekly, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). His sentencing date hasn’t been announced.
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