U.S., Peruvian Navies Agree to Boost Institutional Exchange

U.S., Peruvian Navies Agree to Boost Institutional Exchange

By Julieta Pelcastre/Diálogo
August 31, 2016

The Peruvian and United States navies have agreed to step up their institutional cooperation in order to improve international security and strengthen bilateral relations. As per the inter-institutional cooperation plan established by the U.S. Naval War College (USNWC) and the Peruvian War College (ESUP, for its Spanish acronym) in September 2015, the naval attaché to the Peruvian Embassy in the United States, Rear Admiral Herbert Del Alamo Carrillo visited the USNWC's president, Rear Admiral Gardner Howe, on June 16th. The two educational academies agreed to further promote professor and student exchanges, as well as to carry out joint research projects. At the meeting, which was held at USNWC facilities in Newport, Rhode Island, rear admirals Del Alamo and Howe signed the "Academic Cooperation Convention between USNWC and ESUP," which outlines a path of cooperation that has been ongoing since ESUP's founding in 1930. "If we were to summarize that agreement into a single goal, we should consider that its purpose is centered on professional preparation and perfecting our students in the art of strategy to achieve the highest level of international security, maximizing our naval power in its commitment to maritime security in all of the seas and oceans around the world," Rear Admiral Luis Adawi Cáceres, director of the Peruvian Navy's ESUP, told Diálogo. Notable among the academic exchanges benefiting ESUP is the participation of speakers such as Dr. Mary Raum, professor at the Naval War College, and Vice Admiral Nora W. Tyson, Commander of the United States Navy Third Fleet, who participated in the 3rd International Symposium of Officers of the Next Generation of Navies of the Americas, held from August 16th–23rd in Peru. The U.S. Naval War College is a highly esteemed institution that has trained leaders since 1884. According to the school's website, it offers courses on naval command that are equivalent to the Peruvian courses, including a Naval Staff course, and an International Surface Warfare Officer course. A considerable number of officers have been trained in various programs at the Naval War College, from junior-grade participants in the Surface Warfare Officer Course, to higher-level programs like the Regular Command and Staff Course and the Naval Command Course. During the 2015–2016 academic year, the Peruvian Navy had three senior officers at the school: Commander Manuel Fachín Mestanza in the Naval Command Program and Captain Luis Del Carpio Azálgara and Lieutenant Commander Nelson Pinzás Vargas in the Naval Command and Staff Program. Because of their outstanding participation during the 2014–2015 academic year, the latter two officers stayed on as international fellows for an additional year. According to a report from the Peruvian Navy, both Capt. Del Carpio and Lt. Cmdr. Pinzás were part of a team of instructors from the different academic departments. "Our officers participating in the USNWC study programs are acquiring the latest knowledge on the art of strategy, maritime security and international security, and because they are in the graduating classes of the most prestigious naval war school in the world, they have been able to form bonds of friendship and camaraderie, which is the bedrock on which the interoperability of the world's navies is built," said Rear Adm. Cáceres. This professional training will allow the officers to take part in any kind of mission — whether as part of a specific armed force, a joint armed force, a combined or multi-national force — as unit commanders or armed forces commanders, staff commanders, and in different operational forces units. "The relationship between the Peruvian and U.S. navies is in a process of consolidation in terms of trust," said Vice Admiral (r) Jorge Montoya Manrique, president of the Association of Surface Officers. "Not only do we have excellent cooperation between the two navies in the academic sphere, but also in the area of training, military justice and new technology. The two navies are permanently working in close cooperation and with a lot of openness." U.S.-Peru Collaboration In an effort to prevent damage from the effects of the El Niño climatic phenomenon, the U.S. Naval Oceanic Office (NAVOCEANO) and the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) supplied Peruvian authorities with 12 profiling floats in March 2016. The floats were placed in the Pacific Ocean. To strengthen ties between the two countries' legal professionals, judicial officers from the Peruvian Army, Air Force, and Navy met with members of U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) on November 3, 2015, to explain how each judicial body works with the armed institutions and deals with legal issues. PANAMAX Likewise, the Peruvian Navy participates in joint multinational military exercises organized by the U.S. The Peruvian Navy was at the command [for the first time] of the maritime component of the 2016 PANAMAX exercise, an annual multinational exercise organized by SOUTHCOM whose mission is to ensure the security of the Panama Canal and surrounding areas. "An important element that could build trust between the navies of Peru and the U.S. is the government of President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski, who acknowledges the importance of strengthening cooperation with the United States Government in terms of security and intelligence in the fight against drug trafficking, terrorism and organized crime affecting Peru," said César Ortiz Anderson, security analyst and President of Peru's Pro-Citizen Security Association. "For example, thanks to the support of the United States, Colombia has not only had good results in terms of security, but it has also pacified the country. Just like Colombia did, Peru should strengthen its security and intelligence ties with the U.S. We need to strengthen the country," concluded Ortiz.
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