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U.S. Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan W. Greenert Visits Chilean and Peruvian Navies

U.S. Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan W. Greenert Visits Chilean and Peruvian Navies

By Dialogo
February 17, 2015





The Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) of the U.S. Navy, Admiral Jonathan W. Greenert, visited the Chilean Navy and the Peruvian Navy in mid-January to discuss bilateral and defense issues.

“These types of visits, in addition to deepening professional relationships, also increase the experience of both Navies, which has recently been reflected in the range of joint exercises carried out, such as Unitas, RIMPAC and PANAMAX, among others,” the Chilean Navy announced in a press release.

The CNO is the principal Naval advisor to the U.S. president and the secretary of the Navy.

Strengthening ties between countries


During his visit to Chile, Admiral Greenert spoke at a January 12 conference at the Andrés Bello Diplomatic Academy about the U.S. pivot toward the Asia-Pacific region, Infodefensa
reported. Admiral Greenert was accompanied by Defense and Naval attaché Captain Reginald Baker and Naval attaché Commander David C. Verona.

Greenert, upon completing his speech, traveled to the Ministry of Defense, where he met with Minister Jorge Burgos, and the Commander in Chief of the Navy, Admiral Enrique Larrañaga. There, they discussed the excellent relations between the two governments and touched on various areas of cooperation in the Naval field. They also spoke about research, development and the use of biofuels. Both navies have been seeking greater security and lower costs for energy supplies since 2010, according to Infodefensa.

“This meeting is part of the process of building trust between the different Navies taking part in this exercise,” said Jairo Libreros, a security analyst at Externado University of Colombia. “At this conference, he highlighted the importance of maintaining peace and stability in the region and he detailed the vision of the United States on this issue.”

Praise for the Chilean Navy


The U.S. delegation also traveled to the headquarters of the Chilean Navy in Valparaíso, where Greenert officially greeted Larrañaga, followed by a working meeting that included the participation of other Naval authorities.

During his visit, Greenert also toured the Punta Ángeles Complex and its Maritime Search and Rescue facilities, known internationally as MRCC Chile. It controls and monitors all of the vessels that ply the waters under national jurisdiction using modern satellite systems. He also visited the facilities of the Navy’s Hydrographic and Oceanographic Service (SHOA).

“You have a remarkable combination of science, technology, oversight and control. Your discipline and connection with the Emergency Committees is impressive,” Greenert wrote in SHOA's guestbook, referring to the National Seismological Center (CSN) and the National Emergency Office (ONEMI), which work together to monitor and respond to strong earthquakes and the possibility of a tsunami.

Chile is considered one of the most earthquake-prone countries in the world, and has had at least 80 earthquakes since colonial times, some of which have been accompanied by tsunamis. In 2010, an 8.8 magnitude earthquake and ensuing tsunami killed more than 500 people and destroyed 220,000 homes.

The U.S. delegation was also shown combat equipment and the capabilities of the Expeditionary Amphibious Brigade. Finally, they visited the Naval Aviation facilities at the Concón Naval Air Base, as well as the frigate Almirante Blanco, in Molo de Abrigo, where they were received by Commander of Naval Operations Rear Admiral Julio Leiva.

Admiral Greenert’s visit to Peru


During his visits to Lima and Iquitos on January 14-15, Admiral Greenert met with Defense Minister Pedro Cateriano, the Commander General of the Peruvian Navy, Admiral Edmundo Deville del Campo, and other high-ranking Military officials.

“The meeting served to strengthen cooperation between the navies and intensify collaboration in the areas of education and training,” Peru's Ministry of Defense reported, adding that this was the first visit by a U.S. Naval chief in many years.

Greenert recognized the work of Peru's Navy, which he called “one of the best in the world,” highlighting “the exceptional capabilities of Peruvian submariners.”

At the Naval Hospital, Greenert had the opportunity to visit the U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit No. 6 (NAMRU-6), through which Peru and the United States are working together to prevent and treat tropical diseases. And in Iquitos, Greenert visited the facilities of the Naval Industrial Service (SIMA) and the Nanay Naval Base, where he boarded one of the mobile social inclusion platforms (PIAS) that the Navy uses to provide healthcare services to coastal populations.

According to Libreros, the Chilean Navy is one of the strongest institutions in Latin America. In the past 20 years, the Armed Forces of Latin America have sought to establish new missions and new ways to help their civilian populations. “The Navies are aware that they also have to participate in the discussion about their institutional missions and their research roles, because they cannot afford to get left behind the progress of many other armed forces.”

International cooperation is important for each of these Naval forces.

“The relationship between these three Navies [Chile, Peru and the United States] is in the process of building mutual trust, through work on joint tasks and with a promising future in terms of research, new technologies and human resources. Without question, this is the future not only for their Navies, but for the whole concept of Armed Forces.”




The Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) of the U.S. Navy, Admiral Jonathan W. Greenert, visited the Chilean Navy and the Peruvian Navy in mid-January to discuss bilateral and defense issues.

“These types of visits, in addition to deepening professional relationships, also increase the experience of both Navies, which has recently been reflected in the range of joint exercises carried out, such as Unitas, RIMPAC and PANAMAX, among others,” the Chilean Navy announced in a press release.

The CNO is the principal Naval advisor to the U.S. president and the secretary of the Navy.

Strengthening ties between countries


During his visit to Chile, Admiral Greenert spoke at a January 12 conference at the Andrés Bello Diplomatic Academy about the U.S. pivot toward the Asia-Pacific region, Infodefensa
reported. Admiral Greenert was accompanied by Defense and Naval attaché Captain Reginald Baker and Naval attaché Commander David C. Verona.

Greenert, upon completing his speech, traveled to the Ministry of Defense, where he met with Minister Jorge Burgos, and the Commander in Chief of the Navy, Admiral Enrique Larrañaga. There, they discussed the excellent relations between the two governments and touched on various areas of cooperation in the Naval field. They also spoke about research, development and the use of biofuels. Both navies have been seeking greater security and lower costs for energy supplies since 2010, according to Infodefensa.

“This meeting is part of the process of building trust between the different Navies taking part in this exercise,” said Jairo Libreros, a security analyst at Externado University of Colombia. “At this conference, he highlighted the importance of maintaining peace and stability in the region and he detailed the vision of the United States on this issue.”

Praise for the Chilean Navy


The U.S. delegation also traveled to the headquarters of the Chilean Navy in Valparaíso, where Greenert officially greeted Larrañaga, followed by a working meeting that included the participation of other Naval authorities.

During his visit, Greenert also toured the Punta Ángeles Complex and its Maritime Search and Rescue facilities, known internationally as MRCC Chile. It controls and monitors all of the vessels that ply the waters under national jurisdiction using modern satellite systems. He also visited the facilities of the Navy’s Hydrographic and Oceanographic Service (SHOA).

“You have a remarkable combination of science, technology, oversight and control. Your discipline and connection with the Emergency Committees is impressive,” Greenert wrote in SHOA's guestbook, referring to the National Seismological Center (CSN) and the National Emergency Office (ONEMI), which work together to monitor and respond to strong earthquakes and the possibility of a tsunami.

Chile is considered one of the most earthquake-prone countries in the world, and has had at least 80 earthquakes since colonial times, some of which have been accompanied by tsunamis. In 2010, an 8.8 magnitude earthquake and ensuing tsunami killed more than 500 people and destroyed 220,000 homes.

The U.S. delegation was also shown combat equipment and the capabilities of the Expeditionary Amphibious Brigade. Finally, they visited the Naval Aviation facilities at the Concón Naval Air Base, as well as the frigate Almirante Blanco, in Molo de Abrigo, where they were received by Commander of Naval Operations Rear Admiral Julio Leiva.

Admiral Greenert’s visit to Peru


During his visits to Lima and Iquitos on January 14-15, Admiral Greenert met with Defense Minister Pedro Cateriano, the Commander General of the Peruvian Navy, Admiral Edmundo Deville del Campo, and other high-ranking Military officials.

“The meeting served to strengthen cooperation between the navies and intensify collaboration in the areas of education and training,” Peru's Ministry of Defense reported, adding that this was the first visit by a U.S. Naval chief in many years.

Greenert recognized the work of Peru's Navy, which he called “one of the best in the world,” highlighting “the exceptional capabilities of Peruvian submariners.”

At the Naval Hospital, Greenert had the opportunity to visit the U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit No. 6 (NAMRU-6), through which Peru and the United States are working together to prevent and treat tropical diseases. And in Iquitos, Greenert visited the facilities of the Naval Industrial Service (SIMA) and the Nanay Naval Base, where he boarded one of the mobile social inclusion platforms (PIAS) that the Navy uses to provide healthcare services to coastal populations.

According to Libreros, the Chilean Navy is one of the strongest institutions in Latin America. In the past 20 years, the Armed Forces of Latin America have sought to establish new missions and new ways to help their civilian populations. “The Navies are aware that they also have to participate in the discussion about their institutional missions and their research roles, because they cannot afford to get left behind the progress of many other armed forces.”

International cooperation is important for each of these Naval forces.

“The relationship between these three Navies [Chile, Peru and the United States] is in the process of building mutual trust, through work on joint tasks and with a promising future in terms of research, new technologies and human resources. Without question, this is the future not only for their Navies, but for the whole concept of Armed Forces.”
IT'S VERY IMPORTANT ... BUT WE WILL NEVER TRUST OUR RELATIONSHIP WITH CHILE, OUR FEELINGS BECAUSE OF WHAT HAPPENED WITH CHILE ARE AND WILL ALWAYS BE VERY HURT BECAUSE OF THE WAY CHILE ABUSED IT'S POWER AGAINST AN UNARMED COUNTRY. I'M SORRY BUT THAT'S HOW I FEEL AND DON'T WANT ANY WARS WHERE IN THE END NO ONE "WINS"... I want to learn more about the accident in Pucaran. Mr. WONG, you need to be specific, or are you speaking for the Peruvian-Bolivian Confederation, I remind you that the Chileans freed thousands of Chinese that you had as slaves working the guano fields in shackles and chains. Don't gloss over history, sir. In order to lie and eat fish, you have to be very careful.
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