U.S. Armed Forces to Hold Joint Counter-Narcotics Exercises with Partner Nations

By Dialogo
April 24, 2015



Mexican Army helps capture alleged leader of Juárez Cartel


The Mexican Army, Attorney General’s Office and Federal Police teamed to capture the alleged leader of the Juárez Cartel, one of the largest transnational criminal organizations in the country.

The suspect, who is known as “El Chuyin,” is “considered the one responsible for the criminal organization’s drug smuggling, murder, kidnapping, fuel theft, and arms trafficking operations,” law enforcement National Security Commissioner Monte Alejandro Rubido said on April 19.

Law enforcement authorities captured El Chuyin April 17 at his ranch in Villa Ahumada, about 121 kilometers south of Ciudad Juárez. One of his bodyguards was killed during the raid.

El Chuyin is suspected of leading a cartel that has smuggled massive amounts of narcotics into the U.S. from its base in Ciudad Juárez, across the Rio Grande from the U.S. border. He allegedly took over as head of the cartel after Mexican Army Soldiers and Federal Police agents captured its previous leader, who was known as “El Secre,” in January.

El Chuyin allegedly killed a protected witness in El Paso, Texas, in 2009. He has been sought in Mexico in connection with detonating a car bomb that killed two Federal Police Officers in 2010 and carrying out a 2012 shooting at a bar that left 15 people dead.



U.S. Armed Forces to hold joint counter-narcotics exercises with partner nations


The U.S. Armed Forces is preparing to deploy about 250 Marines to Central America to participate in joint training exercises with four partner nations to bolster cooperation in the fight against transnational criminal organizations.

During the six-month mission beginning in June, Marines will be based in Honduras but will also have personnel in Guatemala, El Salvador, and Belize. The deployment marks the first time Central America will host a land-based Marine rotation of this size, said Lieutenant Colonel David Hudak, the commanding officer of the Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force South (SPMAGTF).

“About 90 percent of the Marines deploying volunteered to go. Morale is high and they’re excited,” LtCol Hudak said.

The Marines will train alongside Central American Armed Forces who are combating narcotraffickers that exploit the region’s jungles and coastlines to smuggle drugs, weapons, money, and humans. About 80 percent of the cocaine that reaches the United States is trafficked through Mexico and Central America, the United Nations International Narcotics Control Board stated in its 2014 Report.

The service members will continue the U.S.’s commitment to help its partner nations. In recent years, smaller teams of Marines have been deployed to Honduras, Guatemala, Belize, and El Salvador to help bolster the region’s response to narcotics and crime.

“We’re all connected in this day and age, and the U.S. has a vested interest in the success of these countries,” LtCol Hudak said. “We’re doing what we can to lend a hand.”

Before arriving, the Marines will have completed an array of courses, including ones centering on security cooperation, joint humanitarianism, and culture. Additionally, the majority of the Marines can already speak Spanish, which will aid in communication.

The timing of the deployment purposely coincides with hurricane season because the joint exercises will also focus on improving each country’s ability to provide better assistance during all types of natural disasters.

“That’s a unique thing the SPMAGTF brings,” LtCol Hudak said. “We have distributed teams in the four countries, but if there were a natural disaster or an event the U.S. was called to respond to, we’d have a limited but immediate capability to provide an initial short-term response.”


Mexican Army helps capture alleged leader of Juárez Cartel


The Mexican Army, Attorney General’s Office and Federal Police teamed to capture the alleged leader of the Juárez Cartel, one of the largest transnational criminal organizations in the country.

The suspect, who is known as “El Chuyin,” is “considered the one responsible for the criminal organization’s drug smuggling, murder, kidnapping, fuel theft, and arms trafficking operations,” law enforcement National Security Commissioner Monte Alejandro Rubido said on April 19.

Law enforcement authorities captured El Chuyin April 17 at his ranch in Villa Ahumada, about 121 kilometers south of Ciudad Juárez. One of his bodyguards was killed during the raid.

El Chuyin is suspected of leading a cartel that has smuggled massive amounts of narcotics into the U.S. from its base in Ciudad Juárez, across the Rio Grande from the U.S. border. He allegedly took over as head of the cartel after Mexican Army Soldiers and Federal Police agents captured its previous leader, who was known as “El Secre,” in January.

El Chuyin allegedly killed a protected witness in El Paso, Texas, in 2009. He has been sought in Mexico in connection with detonating a car bomb that killed two Federal Police Officers in 2010 and carrying out a 2012 shooting at a bar that left 15 people dead.



U.S. Armed Forces to hold joint counter-narcotics exercises with partner nations


The U.S. Armed Forces is preparing to deploy about 250 Marines to Central America to participate in joint training exercises with four partner nations to bolster cooperation in the fight against transnational criminal organizations.

During the six-month mission beginning in June, Marines will be based in Honduras but will also have personnel in Guatemala, El Salvador, and Belize. The deployment marks the first time Central America will host a land-based Marine rotation of this size, said Lieutenant Colonel David Hudak, the commanding officer of the Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force South (SPMAGTF).

“About 90 percent of the Marines deploying volunteered to go. Morale is high and they’re excited,” LtCol Hudak said.

The Marines will train alongside Central American Armed Forces who are combating narcotraffickers that exploit the region’s jungles and coastlines to smuggle drugs, weapons, money, and humans. About 80 percent of the cocaine that reaches the United States is trafficked through Mexico and Central America, the United Nations International Narcotics Control Board stated in its 2014 Report.

The service members will continue the U.S.’s commitment to help its partner nations. In recent years, smaller teams of Marines have been deployed to Honduras, Guatemala, Belize, and El Salvador to help bolster the region’s response to narcotics and crime.

“We’re all connected in this day and age, and the U.S. has a vested interest in the success of these countries,” LtCol Hudak said. “We’re doing what we can to lend a hand.”

Before arriving, the Marines will have completed an array of courses, including ones centering on security cooperation, joint humanitarianism, and culture. Additionally, the majority of the Marines can already speak Spanish, which will aid in communication.

The timing of the deployment purposely coincides with hurricane season because the joint exercises will also focus on improving each country’s ability to provide better assistance during all types of natural disasters.

“That’s a unique thing the SPMAGTF brings,” LtCol Hudak said. “We have distributed teams in the four countries, but if there were a natural disaster or an event the U.S. was called to respond to, we’d have a limited but immediate capability to provide an initial short-term response.”
Good for Mexico that a positive relationship exists among authorities from other countries, to reinforce the cooperation in the fight against transnational criminal organizations, and they will also focus on improving each country's ability to offer more help during every kind of natural disaster, good for the armed forces of Mexico.
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