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The Colombian National Navy Provides Drug Interdiction Training to Eight Countries in the Americas

The Colombian National Navy Provides Drug Interdiction Training to Eight Countries in the Americas

By Julieta Pelcastre
December 17, 2014





The Colombian National Navy recently trained naval forces from eight countries in the Americas in maritime interdiction and other operations during the 12th Coast Guard and Maritime Interdiction Course.

The Navy developed the training course, which is held twice a year, for 18 naval officers from Canada, Colombia, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Panama, and the Dominican Republic. It took place from October 20 - November 27 at the Bolivar Naval Base in Cartagena, with the objective of strengthening naval responsiveness in the fight against organized crime.

Participating officers learned the best techniques to conduct search-and-rescue missions and anti-drug and anti-human trafficking operations from experienced junior and senior Colombian naval officers. The application of these techniques will allow officers to carry out successful operations against international organized crime groups in the Americas, such as preventing submersible vessels from trafficking drugs, people, cash, and weapons.

At the conclusion of the event, the officers that completed the course received a certificate stating they were qualified to conduct such operations in their home countries.

Colombian military recognized for its training


Colombia’s Armed Forces are recognized for providing high levels of specialized training, and the recent course provided the benefit of their expertise to other countries.

Since 2010, more than 1,100 officers and sailors from 24 Latin American countries, including the navies of Belize, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Panama and Paraguay, have participated in training provided by the Colombian National Navy.

“In 2015, APC-Colombia plans to continue these kinds of initiatives with support from South-South Cooperation via the platform of the Regional Cooperation Program for Mesoamerica,” APC-Colombia reports.

Promoting regional cooperation


Joint training promotes cooperation among Latin American naval forces in their fight against international drug trafficking at sea. Such cooperation has led to many successful security operations, including large drug seizures.

For example, between January 1 and August 31, naval forces from various Latin American countries seized more than 10 tons of cocaine hydrochloride, a sedative which is used in so-called “knock-out” drugs, in the Caribbean. The naval forces conducted these joint operations under the framework of maritime agreements with partner nations, according to Webinfomil
.

“The maritime interdiction course creates the opportunity to form cooperation links with participating naval forces and create agreements and greater trust through its activities between the Armed Forces in order to break up local and international criminal gangs,” Duncan said. “Cooperation is the key to success.”

Commander Camilo Gutiérrez, director of the International Coast Guard School of the Colombian Navy, and Silvia Margarita Carrizosa Camacho, director general of APC-Colombia led the closing ceremony on November 27.
This is an excellent example of how professional the Colombian armed forces are in their fight against drug and weapons trafficking for the guerrillas, now with the U.S.A. again taking up a relationship with Cuba they'll have to come up with new strategies,. It's possible the theater [of war] will shift to the Pacific Ocean, since the Atlantic will become very much controlled and they will lose support from Cuba. Interdiction training: The 12th International Coast Guard Course concluded in Cartagena, Colombia, on November 27. The Colombian National Navy provided training to naval officers from eight countries from the Americas. [APC-Colombia]
The Colombian National Navy recently trained naval forces from eight countries in the Americas in maritime interdiction and other operations during the 12th Coast Guard and Maritime Interdiction Course.
The Navy developed the training course, which is held twice a year, for 18 naval officers from Canada, Colombia, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Panama, and the Dominican Republic. It took place from October 20 - November 27 at the Bolivar Naval Base in Cartagena, with the objective of strengthening naval responsiveness in the fight against organized crime.
Participating officers learned the best techniques to conduct search-and-rescue missions and anti-drug and anti-human trafficking operations from experienced junior and senior Colombian naval officers. The application of these techniques will allow officers to carry out successful operations against international organized crime groups in the Americas, such as preventing submersible vessels from trafficking drugs, people, cash, and weapons.
At the conclusion of the event, the officers that completed the course received a certificate stating they were qualified to conduct such operations in their home countries.
Colombian military recognized for its training

Colombia’s Armed Forces are recognized for providing high levels of specialized training, and the recent course provided the benefit of their expertise to other countries.
Since 2010, more than 1,100 officers and sailors from 24 Latin American countries, including the navies of Belize, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Panama and Paraguay, have participated in training provided by the Colombian National Navy.
“In 2015, APC-Colombia plans to continue these kinds of initiatives with support from South-South Cooperation via the platform of the Regional Cooperation Program for Mesoamerica,” APC-Colombia reports.
Promoting regional cooperation

Joint training promotes cooperation among Latin American naval forces in their fight against international drug trafficking at sea. Such cooperation has led to many successful security operations, including large drug seizures.
For example, between January 1 and August 31, naval forces from various Latin American countries seized more than 10 tons of cocaine hydrochloride, a sedative which is used in so-called “knock-out” drugs, in the Caribbean. The naval forces conducted these joint operations under the framework of maritime agreements with partner nations, according to Webinfomil
.
“The maritime interdiction course creates the opportunity to form cooperation links with participating naval forces and create agreements and greater trust through its activities between the Armed Forces in order to break up local and international criminal gangs,” Duncan said. “Cooperation is the key to success.”
Commander Camilo Gutiérrez, director of the International Coast Guard School of the Colombian Navy, and Silvia Margarita Carrizosa Camacho, director general of APC-Colombia led the closing ceremony on November 27.
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