The Armed Forces of Peru and Colombia Cooperate against Illegal Mining

The Armed Forces of Peru and Colombia Cooperate against Illegal Mining

By Dialogo
January 16, 2015





The governments of Peru and Colombia are working in cooperation along the border the two countries share to stop illegal mining and mitigate its impact on the environment.

The Armed Forces of the two countries are working cooperatively to carry out the Memorandum of Understanding they signed in February 2014. The agreement calls for Peru and Colombia to work cooperatively to develop a strategy to fight illegal mining; to assess the environmental impact of such activity; to share information about such unlawful enterprises, and to carry out joint law enforcement operations to fight this crime.

It also calls on Peru and Colombia to work cooperatively to stop organized crime groups from smuggling the machinery needed to engage in illegal mining, according to the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Relations.

“In this partnership with Colombia, we have planned for actions against all acts that threaten the security, economy, natural resources, environment and health of our two nations stemming from illegal mining and related criminal offenses, such as trafficking in persons and forced child labor,” said Augusto Aníbal Soto Castañola, the High Commissioner for Mining Formalization in Peru.

“This is a bilateral battle because we share the problems of terrorism, drug trafficking, illegal mining and others, and therefore we are coordinating the joint execution of our actions,” added Daniel Urresti, Peru’s Minister of Internal Affairs.

Strategy includes help for civilian population


In addition to calling for joint action by security forces against illegal miners, the treaty also seeks to promote sustainable economic activities, such as fish farming and the production of cacao in the border region, the Embassy of Colombia in Lima stated. Cacao production provides an alternative to the illegal cultivation of coca leaves for the purpose of producing cocaine.

The agreement between the two countries warrants for a broad strategy of enforcement against illegal mining, protection of the ecosystem, and improved opportunities for communities that live in the border region.

“The work along the Peru-Colombia border focuses on the Putumayo River basin, where we must meet the needs of the communities, finding a balance between human settlements and the environment,” Soto Castañola said.

The Putumayo River is located along the border between Peru and Colombia. The two countries are divided by a continuous, 1,626 kilometer-long-long border.

Illegal mining generates billions of dollars annually


The basis of the agreement between Peru and Colombia is to stop an unlawful enterprise which accounts for huge revenues for organized crime groups in both nations.

Organized crime groups generate about $29 billion from illegal mining annually in Peru, according to the Office of the Chairman of Peru's Council of Ministers. This figure is 12 percent higher than the estimated annual revenue – about $25 billion – generated in Peru by drug trafficking.

In Colombia, about 63 percent of all mining is conducted illegally, according to the Office of the Comptroller General.

Annually, organized crime groups launder about $48.5 billion generated by illegal mining, according to a report titled, “Mining in Colombia, Institutionality and Territory, Paradoxes and Conflicts,” released by the Office of the Comptroller General.








The governments of Peru and Colombia are working in cooperation along the border the two countries share to stop illegal mining and mitigate its impact on the environment.

The Armed Forces of the two countries are working cooperatively to carry out the Memorandum of Understanding they signed in February 2014. The agreement calls for Peru and Colombia to work cooperatively to develop a strategy to fight illegal mining; to assess the environmental impact of such activity; to share information about such unlawful enterprises, and to carry out joint law enforcement operations to fight this crime.

It also calls on Peru and Colombia to work cooperatively to stop organized crime groups from smuggling the machinery needed to engage in illegal mining, according to the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Relations.

“In this partnership with Colombia, we have planned for actions against all acts that threaten the security, economy, natural resources, environment and health of our two nations stemming from illegal mining and related criminal offenses, such as trafficking in persons and forced child labor,” said Augusto Aníbal Soto Castañola, the High Commissioner for Mining Formalization in Peru.

“This is a bilateral battle because we share the problems of terrorism, drug trafficking, illegal mining and others, and therefore we are coordinating the joint execution of our actions,” added Daniel Urresti, Peru’s Minister of Internal Affairs.

Strategy includes help for civilian population


In addition to calling for joint action by security forces against illegal miners, the treaty also seeks to promote sustainable economic activities, such as fish farming and the production of cacao in the border region, the Embassy of Colombia in Lima stated. Cacao production provides an alternative to the illegal cultivation of coca leaves for the purpose of producing cocaine.

The agreement between the two countries warrants for a broad strategy of enforcement against illegal mining, protection of the ecosystem, and improved opportunities for communities that live in the border region.

“The work along the Peru-Colombia border focuses on the Putumayo River basin, where we must meet the needs of the communities, finding a balance between human settlements and the environment,” Soto Castañola said.

The Putumayo River is located along the border between Peru and Colombia. The two countries are divided by a continuous, 1,626 kilometer-long-long border.

Illegal mining generates billions of dollars annually


The basis of the agreement between Peru and Colombia is to stop an unlawful enterprise which accounts for huge revenues for organized crime groups in both nations.

Organized crime groups generate about $29 billion from illegal mining annually in Peru, according to the Office of the Chairman of Peru's Council of Ministers. This figure is 12 percent higher than the estimated annual revenue – about $25 billion – generated in Peru by drug trafficking.

In Colombia, about 63 percent of all mining is conducted illegally, according to the Office of the Comptroller General.

Annually, organized crime groups launder about $48.5 billion generated by illegal mining, according to a report titled, “Mining in Colombia, Institutionality and Territory, Paradoxes and Conflicts,” released by the Office of the Comptroller General.




It's so good to be a reservist in the military forces, I didn't last 20 years in our dear and beloved COLOMBIAN AIR FORCE in vain... Don't shut the mines down on the miners. Let them work, or give them the food they work for so they may eat I didn't like it Well, truly, how could we not thank those who have helped us so much. Before we'd travel on mules because we had no roads, thanks to this valuable help the roads were opened up and along with this came automobiles, the beginning of development for any civilization. And so, thousands of other things.
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