Rules of Engagement for Favela Occupations Must be Reconsidered

Rules of Engagement for Favela Occupations Must be Reconsidered

By Dialogo
May 25, 2015




The Brazilian Armed Forces have cut down monthly drug traffic profits in Rio de Janeiro’s Maré Complex from $15 million Brazilian reals to $300,000 reals since the beginning of the occupation. This loss has been a cause for great concern to the leaders of the three main factions of Rio’s organized crime. Back in February, a lookout made $700 reals a week, but today they barely make any money. Regardless, the situation is still far from being resolved, and the Military is not to blame.

The majority of society believes that organized crime in the favelas
is carried out by rifle-toting drug dealers who sell drugs. That's just the tip of the iceberg of a network that hides thousands of unarmed people, living directly or indirectly off the drug income, in these communities.

This makes it essential for the State to understand the economic impact that asphyxiating drug traffic will cause before there is a military occupation of this magnitude, the and offer alternatives to the people. This did not happen when the Armed Forces left the Alemão Complex and the situation returned to critical levels, compromising the credibility of the process.

Maré residents notice that, and they know that the presence of the Armed Forces is temporary; to illustrate this point, a community leader who strongly supported the Troops in Maré did not have his safety guaranteed and was murdered in late 2014.

The occupation in Maré has very different characteristics than those experienced in Alemão and Haiti, which interferes significantly in the interaction between the Military and the residents, as well as that with criminal groups.

In Alemão there was only one criminal faction. The invasion was unexpected, which did not allow the armed criminals to evade taking inventories of drugs and weapons. However, additional drug trafficking structures remained to enable the operation after the Army’s departure.

In Maré, we have the Army and three rival organized crime factions that are unwilling to give up the territory and abandon the area since they know the Armed Forces will not stay there forever. Two of these factions have been in a violent territory dispute since 2009.

A decisive factor for the success in Alemão was the capture of a huge amount of weapons and drugs early in the operation. This was possible due to the collective search-and-seizure warrants associated with a tip hotline.

In Haiti, the Brazilian Battalion controls the situation because it has carte blanche
to check every house and shoot down anyone who is carrying a gun ostentatiously. Operationally, this is the only way to ensure the Troops the same degree of freedom that organized crime has to go into every home, which they do by terrorizing the community.

The political decision not to grant these same rights to the Troops in Maré has caused unnecessary attrition to the Service Members committed to the mission’s fulfillment. As a result of the Army’s restrictive rules of engagement, illegal drugs are sold and used inside homes, corrupted minors throw stones at Troops, and dealers have moved to slabs, where they ambush the Military after operations that lead to arrests, weapons, and drug seizures. Daily shootings may go on for hours and have hit four Soldiers already, one of them fatally. Asymmetric warfare in our own backyard.

Everyone knows that the Military occupation of the Maré Complex was due to the World Cup and, if it is up to the politicians, it will continue until the Olympics. They said it wouldlast a short period of time, just like they did with Alemão (and that lasted for 520 days), but we can see that is not the case.

We could raise a number of observations about military operations, but the truth is that the solution to the problem lies at the political level. Society needs to understand that the Armed Forces must be allowed to make decisions because they are the last resource being employed. And that is why they cannot continue to operate under the same legal protocols governing the police. It is as similarly deceptive as using the same ineffective formula for a medication, only with a different label, and hoping it will fix the problem. The rules of engagement need to be rewritten if there is a desire to seek efficiency in operations, and to preserve the Military.

*Fernando Montenegro – Colonel R / 1 Special Forces of the Brazilian Army - was commander of the Sampaio Task Force in the occupation and pacification of the Alemão and Penha complexes in 2011.






The Brazilian Armed Forces have cut down monthly drug traffic profits in Rio de Janeiro’s Maré Complex from $15 million Brazilian reals to $300,000 reals since the beginning of the occupation. This loss has been a cause for great concern to the leaders of the three main factions of Rio’s organized crime. Back in February, a lookout made $700 reals a week, but today they barely make any money. Regardless, the situation is still far from being resolved, and the Military is not to blame.

The majority of society believes that organized crime in the favelas
is carried out by rifle-toting drug dealers who sell drugs. That's just the tip of the iceberg of a network that hides thousands of unarmed people, living directly or indirectly off the drug income, in these communities.

This makes it essential for the State to understand the economic impact that asphyxiating drug traffic will cause before there is a military occupation of this magnitude, the and offer alternatives to the people. This did not happen when the Armed Forces left the Alemão Complex and the situation returned to critical levels, compromising the credibility of the process.

Maré residents notice that, and they know that the presence of the Armed Forces is temporary; to illustrate this point, a community leader who strongly supported the Troops in Maré did not have his safety guaranteed and was murdered in late 2014.

The occupation in Maré has very different characteristics than those experienced in Alemão and Haiti, which interferes significantly in the interaction between the Military and the residents, as well as that with criminal groups.

In Alemão there was only one criminal faction. The invasion was unexpected, which did not allow the armed criminals to evade taking inventories of drugs and weapons. However, additional drug trafficking structures remained to enable the operation after the Army’s departure.

In Maré, we have the Army and three rival organized crime factions that are unwilling to give up the territory and abandon the area since they know the Armed Forces will not stay there forever. Two of these factions have been in a violent territory dispute since 2009.

A decisive factor for the success in Alemão was the capture of a huge amount of weapons and drugs early in the operation. This was possible due to the collective search-and-seizure warrants associated with a tip hotline.

In Haiti, the Brazilian Battalion controls the situation because it has carte blanche
to check every house and shoot down anyone who is carrying a gun ostentatiously. Operationally, this is the only way to ensure the Troops the same degree of freedom that organized crime has to go into every home, which they do by terrorizing the community.

The political decision not to grant these same rights to the Troops in Maré has caused unnecessary attrition to the Service Members committed to the mission’s fulfillment. As a result of the Army’s restrictive rules of engagement, illegal drugs are sold and used inside homes, corrupted minors throw stones at Troops, and dealers have moved to slabs, where they ambush the Military after operations that lead to arrests, weapons, and drug seizures. Daily shootings may go on for hours and have hit four Soldiers already, one of them fatally. Asymmetric warfare in our own backyard.

Everyone knows that the Military occupation of the Maré Complex was due to the World Cup and, if it is up to the politicians, it will continue until the Olympics. They said it wouldlast a short period of time, just like they did with Alemão (and that lasted for 520 days), but we can see that is not the case.

We could raise a number of observations about military operations, but the truth is that the solution to the problem lies at the political level. Society needs to understand that the Armed Forces must be allowed to make decisions because they are the last resource being employed. And that is why they cannot continue to operate under the same legal protocols governing the police. It is as similarly deceptive as using the same ineffective formula for a medication, only with a different label, and hoping it will fix the problem. The rules of engagement need to be rewritten if there is a desire to seek efficiency in operations, and to preserve the Military.

*Fernando Montenegro – Colonel R / 1 Special Forces of the Brazilian Army - was commander of the Sampaio Task Force in the occupation and pacification of the Alemão and Penha complexes in 2011.



excellent article Montenegro, I'm sorry, but this civilian does not know his rank. With regard to his speech, excellent. I've even heard or read it in a newspaper. Words that did not put an end to trafficking because of bank interests in the amount of money moved, in addition to the arms trade. Congratulations. There would be no trafficking, drug dealers or distributors, if there were no users. Only through the cooperation of families, schools political will and law enforcement, with equality for all, can we end or minimize this human coldness. Brazil should take a larger number of troops from the barracks to the borders to fight harder against trafficking. With the fewer troops sent, effective combat is impossible. How many soldiers are in the barracks with nothing to do? Dear readers, fortunately in the reserves and now also as a journalist, I can express my opinions in a more incisive way and fight the hypocrisy of some decisions that army personnel are unable to address. An example. Congratulations on the line of thinking, Colonel. Yes, they should separate and train soldiers for this type of work, special soldiers. The military is not the police!
If the military respond like the police, they will just crash and burn. Dear Colonel Fernando Montenegro.

I feel that over 90% of violent crimes are directly or indirectly related to drug trafficking, which is a national problem, not confined to Rio.
You have to go to the source, nip it in the bud. Focus on strategies and missions on the border. We must close our borders with drug trafficking neighbors and be stricter against trafficking in drugs and weapons.

Putting the Armed Forces to act as the police is a trap to put people against the military.

#TamoJunto (#We'reUnited)
#SemprePeloBrasil (AlwaysForBrazil)


Respectfully,

@EdGaarcua This example of search and determination by the Brazilian courts is to improve the system, which is messed up and has been for a long time. I still believe that hard-line judges should make some changes in the laws and give more power to national security forces. I want the opportunity to collaborate with you. Maistela Droescher. I think the Brazilian Army had to be neutral when talking about drug trafficking in the shantytowns (favelas). Do you know why? Most of these soldiers come from shantytowns, mainly in Rio de Janeiro. I myself live in a shantytown and I am going to serve in the Army. I enlist in September. Even the stories about the Armed Forces have invaded shantytowns. I've never heard any music that supports crime in the funk music mentioning the Army. Look, this isn't Iraq, Babylon, Afghanistan or Colombia to be invading the shantytowns with war tanks. Send the police there and that's it. The Army should stay out of this. (y) Plea bargaining (with many fewer official staff members assassinated) needs to evolve. In my view, this requires greater protection and less exposure of our service members. The task forces should have more freedom and the security to act. I think that in order for better results, the leaders should also participate and provide ways for the military to remain in certain areas like this one. Very good information, impressive.... Given that the majority of representatives of the people are corrupt or corrupted, there is no interest in creating laws and actions to put the country on the right track. In this case, it's no different. Service members and innocent people are dying and nothing is being done. Crooks pose as heroes and receive benefits and entitlement that not other communities get. Excellent article about Col. Montenegro. Those who choose to use weapons belonging to the Brazilian Armed Forces, putting the population and security forces at risk, should be judged under the National Security Law, by military tribunal. This is incredible Jesus is coming and you will continue in this war of misery. I am all in favor for greater freedom for the Armed Forces. Our Army is something to be proud of. The Army shouldn't have to go through these situations because it has a history of huge victories. I get angry because no politician sees that. I am proud to have worn this honorable uniform for seven years. Congratulations to Colonel Fernando Montenegro. I agree with everything that you wrote. The government (federal and state) use our Armed Forces demagogically in the insane fight against drug trafficking, yet they don't give them the power to use not only their forces, but their intelligence units capable of greatly reducing the military and financial power of all of these criminal factions that politicians, businessmen and big fish hide behind. Maybe, the competent authorities don't care about seeing them on TV, in newspapers or hearing about them on the radio. If it wasn't for the decisions taken by the PF, MP, CGU and TCU, made up of men capable of standing up to corrupt politicians, stealing, and the gangs of politicians and businessmen involved in the Lavo-Jato scandal, they would still be acting with impunity. more or less




Drugs along with greed of men equates to the loss of humanity Why don't you show that shameless person's face? Cool While drug traffickers continue hidden in slums, the occupation won't result in the needed and wished for success. Residents that offend soldiers and police are part of the group who are indirectly sustained by drug trafficking. They are the first to report to the press that the police "came in shooting". I think the (illegible) method is valid, involving unsuccessful operations and exposing the lives of soldiers and police in constant danger. very good The Army needs to act forcefully against these factions wreaking havoc. If we wait for our government, they will take control of our country, which is already happening. Yes, the Army needs to be called to go in and resolve the situation, and policies for the Army need to be different than those for the police. What's happening in Rio is unfortunate, but in the Knowledge Academies in Brasilia, everyone knows. They want to see everything get worse, but they hardly realise that the Brazilian State of Democratic Law has failed or is about to fail, and the Guardians of the Brazilian Nation-State are on alert, or we'll become a big anarchy with gangs and crooks leading the country like in the Middle East, ungoverned. Congratulations Colonel. Don't expose yourself or our boys. Like these thugs, they have a vision. Unfortunately, it's all dominated, and civilian and military intelligence and counterintelligence units know that. The stage is armed: in Rio, the factions and militias, in São Paulo, Marcolla's PCC, and in other states around the country, it's not very different. There are a lot of weapons in the wrong hands, or it may be on purpose for convenience. Go and reread the book, "A Noite das Grandes Fogueiras" by Guilherme Meirelles. May God save Brazil when this time arrives. Yes. I am certain that most drugs and arms are in the shantytowns (favelas). ??? An ongoing war. Unfortunately, families are used in the most intrinsic holes of social negligence. This is where drug trafficking wins. These are good people, hostages while participants in this snowball rooted like weed that sucks all the life of a river.
It's not cool because they're dispensable to drug trafficking. They're innocent people who lose their souls for the sake of having more food on the table or a false guarantee of being able to come and go. This is something that should be guaranteed by the government through social rights. Drug trafficking will only get worse as long as there is corruption. I hope the government never becomes indifferent towards the poor. May they be treated like kings and queens, princes and princesses in obtaining their rights, and may those responsible for looking after the rights of the government be properly paid as they deserve. The military is supposed to guard our borders to prevent smuggling of weapons and drugs. Colonel Montenegro was happy and revealing in his lucid comments. The Colonel made very good arguments: the Armed Forces is the last resort used in certain cases. When they are called to duty, they need the freedom to act. The case of drug trafficking for some time already in Brazil is a national security situation. The enemy can be internal or external. The Armed Forces are the faithful guardians of the Brazilian Constitution and have to be prepared for whatever comes. They have the trust of the Brazilian people. This portal only has old news. The Army needs the authority to operate in any place in Brazil. Pay office of Navy staff. Increase wages and benefits. Good morning, best and warm regards. That's it. The Army should provide the police with support in certain operations I agree with the Colonel because they're playing with fire. The Brazilian Armed Forces should not be used in any ordinary security action. Military occupation means recognising the state of war going on in the "Marvelous City". The Army is not the police. I speak from experience as a former soldier. The strategy is to occupy the area and annihilate the armed enemy. I would like the CLASSIC UOL COLONEL AND GENERAL IN COMMAND OVER BRAZIL Our government leaders need to understand that violence is only fought through a first class education. Arms manufactures should be held liable for the deaths they cause or for maintaining an arms tracking system. The blame needs to be put at the source of the supply, which is in the border regions. They continue to be wide open due to the absence of adequate policies. Everyone knows that putting an end to the disease before it reaches people is a more effective and economic way. What we don't understand is the Brazilian government's kindness towards countries like Bolivia and Peru, and even towards suspected Colombian revolutionaries. There are many people in the background behind drug trafficking in Brazil.
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