Peruvian police act quickly to capture robbery gang suspects

Peruvian police act quickly to capture robbery gang suspects

By Dialogo
October 23, 2014




Agents with the National Police of Peru (PNP), including investigators with the elite Genesis Group recently acted quickly to capture three members of an armed robbery gang known as The Gunmen of Callao.

The police operation demonstrates the increasing professionalism and effectiveness of the country’s security forces, according Peruvian Interior Minister Daniel Urresti.

“It was a very professional job, very fine, (an operation) of much patience which was achieved in a short time,” Urresti said, according to the Andina
news agency.

Peruvian police captured the three suspects on September 26 as they allegedly attempted to rob a gas station in San Martin de Porres district of Lima, according to an Interior Ministry press release.

Police agents noticed that the occupants of a black Chevrolet vehicle, license plate number C9C-560, were behaving in a suspicious manner. Police intervened and captured them before they could commit the robbery.

Police said the three men are also suspects in September 16 robbery of more than (USD) $2,000 from a pharmacy in the San Martin de Porres district and the assault and robbery of a Banco de Crédito del Perú employee in the Cercado de Lima district. The Interior Minister identified the suspects as Carlos Alva Mayekawa, 33, who is also known as “Alianza,” Ricardo Carrasco Sánchez, 47, who is also known as “Saltarín,” and Walter Torres Santiago, 30, who also goes by the name “Junior.” All three had extensive criminal backgrounds, according to the Interior Ministry press release. Police seized firearms, ammunition, surgical gloves and several packages of drugs during the arrest.

Alianza, Saltarín, and Junior were part of a robbery gang known as the Gunman of Callao, a group of about ten armed and dangerous individuals based in the port city of El Callao, which is part of the Lima metropolitan area.

At a press conference announcing the arrests, Urresti praised the 22 members of the Genesis Group, the Criminal Investigation Division (DIVINCRI) and the National Police of Peru (PNP) who participated in the capture of the three alleged robbers.

Police officials created the Genesis Group in 2013, as an intelligence unit under the Directorate of Criminal Investigation (Dirincri) of the PNP. The Genesis Group is comprised of highly experienced investigators who police commanders chose from the 140,000 officers and employees of the PNP. The Genesis Group is mandated with identifying, tracking, locating, and capturing suspected killers, gang members, kidnappers, and robbers.

Peruvian police formed the Genesis Group to fight organized crime. Many officers in the unit have experience gathering intelligence. The Genesis Group is designed to fight organized crime with the same methods and techniques that are used by the PNP’s national intelligence unit (GEIN), which focuses on battling terrorism.

In addition to relying on experienced personnel, the Genesis Group also makes extensive use of the PNP’s Integrated Ballistics Identification System (IBIS) and Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS).

The creation of the Genesis Group is part of the Peruvian government’s five-year National Citizen Security Plan 2013-2018, which calls for restructuring the PNP.

In his Independence Day message to the nation in July 2014, Peru President Ollanta Humala hailed the efforts of Peruvian security forces.

From July 2013 to July 2014, Peruvian police had arrested 160,000 people for various crimes, dismantled 4,767 organized criminal bands and seized smuggled and pirated goods worth more than $200 million (USD), the president said. The PNP had also broken up 153 gangs that engaged in assault and robbery on the national road network.

An ongoing battle against crime


The government is continuing to do all it can to improve public safety, the president said. The government plans on adding 30,000 more officers to the PNP in the next few years and providing them 10,000 new vehicles. The government will also remodel more than 300 police stations and provide new communications and video security systems to the PNP.

“Have confidence that we will continue fighting this scourge which is a threat to the state,” the president said in August, after Peruvian security forces dismantled an international drug trafficking ring.

The government’s initiatives to improve the training and equipment of police forces are improving public safety, according to César Ortiz Anderson, president of the Association for Public Safety of Peru (APROSEC).

Peruvian police “have (registered) significant successes in the fight against criminal organizations,” Ortiz said.

Julieta Pelcastre contributed to this article.




Agents with the National Police of Peru (PNP), including investigators with the elite Genesis Group recently acted quickly to capture three members of an armed robbery gang known as The Gunmen of Callao.

The police operation demonstrates the increasing professionalism and effectiveness of the country’s security forces, according Peruvian Interior Minister Daniel Urresti.

“It was a very professional job, very fine, (an operation) of much patience which was achieved in a short time,” Urresti said, according to the Andina
news agency.

Peruvian police captured the three suspects on September 26 as they allegedly attempted to rob a gas station in San Martin de Porres district of Lima, according to an Interior Ministry press release.

Police agents noticed that the occupants of a black Chevrolet vehicle, license plate number C9C-560, were behaving in a suspicious manner. Police intervened and captured them before they could commit the robbery.

Police said the three men are also suspects in September 16 robbery of more than (USD) $2,000 from a pharmacy in the San Martin de Porres district and the assault and robbery of a Banco de Crédito del Perú employee in the Cercado de Lima district. The Interior Minister identified the suspects as Carlos Alva Mayekawa, 33, who is also known as “Alianza,” Ricardo Carrasco Sánchez, 47, who is also known as “Saltarín,” and Walter Torres Santiago, 30, who also goes by the name “Junior.” All three had extensive criminal backgrounds, according to the Interior Ministry press release. Police seized firearms, ammunition, surgical gloves and several packages of drugs during the arrest.

Alianza, Saltarín, and Junior were part of a robbery gang known as the Gunman of Callao, a group of about ten armed and dangerous individuals based in the port city of El Callao, which is part of the Lima metropolitan area.

At a press conference announcing the arrests, Urresti praised the 22 members of the Genesis Group, the Criminal Investigation Division (DIVINCRI) and the National Police of Peru (PNP) who participated in the capture of the three alleged robbers.

Police officials created the Genesis Group in 2013, as an intelligence unit under the Directorate of Criminal Investigation (Dirincri) of the PNP. The Genesis Group is comprised of highly experienced investigators who police commanders chose from the 140,000 officers and employees of the PNP. The Genesis Group is mandated with identifying, tracking, locating, and capturing suspected killers, gang members, kidnappers, and robbers.

Peruvian police formed the Genesis Group to fight organized crime. Many officers in the unit have experience gathering intelligence. The Genesis Group is designed to fight organized crime with the same methods and techniques that are used by the PNP’s national intelligence unit (GEIN), which focuses on battling terrorism.

In addition to relying on experienced personnel, the Genesis Group also makes extensive use of the PNP’s Integrated Ballistics Identification System (IBIS) and Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS).

The creation of the Genesis Group is part of the Peruvian government’s five-year National Citizen Security Plan 2013-2018, which calls for restructuring the PNP.

In his Independence Day message to the nation in July 2014, Peru President Ollanta Humala hailed the efforts of Peruvian security forces.

From July 2013 to July 2014, Peruvian police had arrested 160,000 people for various crimes, dismantled 4,767 organized criminal bands and seized smuggled and pirated goods worth more than $200 million (USD), the president said. The PNP had also broken up 153 gangs that engaged in assault and robbery on the national road network.

An ongoing battle against crime


The government is continuing to do all it can to improve public safety, the president said. The government plans on adding 30,000 more officers to the PNP in the next few years and providing them 10,000 new vehicles. The government will also remodel more than 300 police stations and provide new communications and video security systems to the PNP.

“Have confidence that we will continue fighting this scourge which is a threat to the state,” the president said in August, after Peruvian security forces dismantled an international drug trafficking ring.

The government’s initiatives to improve the training and equipment of police forces are improving public safety, according to César Ortiz Anderson, president of the Association for Public Safety of Peru (APROSEC).

Peruvian police “have (registered) significant successes in the fight against criminal organizations,” Ortiz said.

Julieta Pelcastre contributed to this article.

Everything destined to repress crime is positive. it is very good We can appreciate the effort to improve by the police and an increase in captures. But, what about the Judicial Power??? We see that the same criminals who should be in jail are free and committing crimes because they were freed out of corruption. The Judicial power needs reform and to start with cleaning it out.
Share