Peruvian Military Protects Soldiers and Civilians from Ebola Virus

Peruvian Military Protects Soldiers and Civilians from Ebola Virus

By Dialogo
February 10, 2015




To protect the Troops and the civilian population, the Peruvian Military is carefully screening Soldiers returning from United Nations peacekeeping missions in Africa for the deadly Ebola virus.

The Joint Staff announced that the Armed Forces are deploying strict procedures for Troops coming home from peacekeeping missions in Africa and Haiti, even though there were no reported cases of infection there.

Soldiers returning from such missions will undergo tests at the National Institute of Health to determine if they are infected with the virus. The procedures are designed to protect the health of Troops assigned to regions where the virus is present, as well as those returning from areas where it has not been detected.

The Army, the Navy, the Air Force, the Peacekeeping Operations Unit, and the Ministry of Health are coordinating the new protocols.

In Africa, Peru has Military observers deployed in the Ivory Coast and Troops dedicated to training the civilian police force in Liberia, where the second-highest number of confirmed Ebola cases were reported.

Another group of Peruvian Soldiers is scheduled to return from a peacekeeping mission to Africa after August 1, where Peru has a total 39 officers and Soldiers deployed.

Providing
health
care
to
protect
Troops
and
civilians


“Like other countries in the region that sent Military forces as part of a humanitarian aid mission, Peru has been implementing protocols and disease-prevention programs for which the troops are receiving ongoing training on protective measures against Ebola. They have also been issued personal protective equipment for cases involving the potential presence of the disease in their areas of responsibility,” explained Fernando Palomino Milla, a retired Rear Admiral of the Peruvian Navy.

In October, President Ollanta Humala signed a decree ordering the deployment of measures to prevent Ebola from entering Peru.

The procedures are proving to be effective. As of late January, no cases of Ebola had been reported in Latin America.

Preventing the virus from spreading is crucial because of its high fatality rate. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the fatality rate for Ebola in Africa had risen to 70 percent in October.

The virus is transmitted through direct contact with blood, bodily fluids, and the tissues of infected animals and people.

Health authorities in West Africa have been fighting the current outbreak of the deadly virus for almost a year. It began in Guinea in December 2013 and then spread to Liberia and Sierra Leone. Nigeria, Senegal, and Mali later reported infected cases, but have since been declared disease-free.

Tragic Death of a Soldier not connected to Ebola


Peruvian Military authorities were prepared to tread a possible case of Ebola in early January.

On December 26, Peruvian Army officer Mario Rengifo Clavijo, who had recently returned from a mission in Africa, was hospitalized with symptoms that were similar to those of Ebola, including high fever, nausea, and weakness.

On January 14, the Soldier died while being treated at the Central Military Hospital, but medical tests determined Rengifo Clavijo had been infected with Malaria, not Ebola.



To protect the Troops and the civilian population, the Peruvian Military is carefully screening Soldiers returning from United Nations peacekeeping missions in Africa for the deadly Ebola virus.

The Joint Staff announced that the Armed Forces are deploying strict procedures for Troops coming home from peacekeeping missions in Africa and Haiti, even though there were no reported cases of infection there.

Soldiers returning from such missions will undergo tests at the National Institute of Health to determine if they are infected with the virus. The procedures are designed to protect the health of Troops assigned to regions where the virus is present, as well as those returning from areas where it has not been detected.

The Army, the Navy, the Air Force, the Peacekeeping Operations Unit, and the Ministry of Health are coordinating the new protocols.

In Africa, Peru has Military observers deployed in the Ivory Coast and Troops dedicated to training the civilian police force in Liberia, where the second-highest number of confirmed Ebola cases were reported.

Another group of Peruvian Soldiers is scheduled to return from a peacekeeping mission to Africa after August 1, where Peru has a total 39 officers and Soldiers deployed.

Providing
health
care
to
protect
Troops
and
civilians


“Like other countries in the region that sent Military forces as part of a humanitarian aid mission, Peru has been implementing protocols and disease-prevention programs for which the troops are receiving ongoing training on protective measures against Ebola. They have also been issued personal protective equipment for cases involving the potential presence of the disease in their areas of responsibility,” explained Fernando Palomino Milla, a retired Rear Admiral of the Peruvian Navy.

In October, President Ollanta Humala signed a decree ordering the deployment of measures to prevent Ebola from entering Peru.

The procedures are proving to be effective. As of late January, no cases of Ebola had been reported in Latin America.

Preventing the virus from spreading is crucial because of its high fatality rate. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the fatality rate for Ebola in Africa had risen to 70 percent in October.

The virus is transmitted through direct contact with blood, bodily fluids, and the tissues of infected animals and people.

Health authorities in West Africa have been fighting the current outbreak of the deadly virus for almost a year. It began in Guinea in December 2013 and then spread to Liberia and Sierra Leone. Nigeria, Senegal, and Mali later reported infected cases, but have since been declared disease-free.

Tragic Death of a Soldier not connected to Ebola


Peruvian Military authorities were prepared to tread a possible case of Ebola in early January.

On December 26, Peruvian Army officer Mario Rengifo Clavijo, who had recently returned from a mission in Africa, was hospitalized with symptoms that were similar to those of Ebola, including high fever, nausea, and weakness.

On January 14, the Soldier died while being treated at the Central Military Hospital, but medical tests determined Rengifo Clavijo had been infected with Malaria, not Ebola.
My comment is that all young Peruvian men should go into military service.
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