Peruvian Army and National Police Destroy Clandestine Landing Strips

By Dialogo
February 04, 2015



Working in cooperation, Peruvian Army Troops and National Police officers destroyed six clandestine landing strips used by narco-traffickers during a joint operation in the Apurimac, Ene and Mantaro Rivers Valley (VRAEM) region, the Armed Forces Joint Command reported January 27.

The operation was part of the Army and National Police’s commitment to crack down on narco-traffickers and improve security and development in the VRAEM, where organized crime groups illegally cultivate large amounts of coca, the main ingredient used to make cocaine. The landing strips were in the Province of Satipo, which is in the Region of Junín.

The Army and the National Police did not immediately announce any arrests.

The Shining Path terrorist group uses clandestine airstrips to transport drugs, which fund its criminal activities. The guerrilla group often pays local residents to repair the airstrips after they've been disabled, causing the Armed Forces and National Police to bolster their surveillance in narco-trafficking hotbeds.

Since 2011, Peruvian Security Forces have destroyed at least 60 clandestine landing strips used by narco-traffickers. Most runways were 500 meters long and 10 meters wide. Most of the landing strips were in the VRAEM.

Peru is working cooperatively with neighboring Bolivia to combat narco-trafficking. Drug traffickers transport about half of the 450 tons of cocaine produced in Peru annually to Bolivia.

In 2012, criminal organizations cultivated more than 60,000 hectares of coca crops in Peru, which is home to 13-coca growing regions. The vast majority of the coca produced in the country – 93 percent – is used to produce illegal drugs, with the remaining plants used for traditional consumption and industrial use, according to Peru’s National Commission for a Drug-Free Life (DEVIDA).

Colombian National Army eradicates coca field


Soldiers with the Colombian National Army recently eradicated a 9.5-hectare field of illegal coca and destroyed a cocaine laboratory used by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) in the Department of Meta.

Troops seized 110 gallons of cocaine in liquid form as well as equipment used to make the drug from the laboratory that was operated by the FARC’s 43rd Front in the municipality of Puerto Rico.

In a separate operation, in the village of El Danubio, Soldiers eradicated a 9.5-hectare field of illegal coca that was being used to produce cocaine by the Eastern Bloc of the FARC, the country’s largest narco-trafficking group. The Army did not immediately announce any arrests.


Working in cooperation, Peruvian Army Troops and National Police officers destroyed six clandestine landing strips used by narco-traffickers during a joint operation in the Apurimac, Ene and Mantaro Rivers Valley (VRAEM) region, the Armed Forces Joint Command reported January 27.

The operation was part of the Army and National Police’s commitment to crack down on narco-traffickers and improve security and development in the VRAEM, where organized crime groups illegally cultivate large amounts of coca, the main ingredient used to make cocaine. The landing strips were in the Province of Satipo, which is in the Region of Junín.

The Army and the National Police did not immediately announce any arrests.

The Shining Path terrorist group uses clandestine airstrips to transport drugs, which fund its criminal activities. The guerrilla group often pays local residents to repair the airstrips after they've been disabled, causing the Armed Forces and National Police to bolster their surveillance in narco-trafficking hotbeds.

Since 2011, Peruvian Security Forces have destroyed at least 60 clandestine landing strips used by narco-traffickers. Most runways were 500 meters long and 10 meters wide. Most of the landing strips were in the VRAEM.

Peru is working cooperatively with neighboring Bolivia to combat narco-trafficking. Drug traffickers transport about half of the 450 tons of cocaine produced in Peru annually to Bolivia.

In 2012, criminal organizations cultivated more than 60,000 hectares of coca crops in Peru, which is home to 13-coca growing regions. The vast majority of the coca produced in the country – 93 percent – is used to produce illegal drugs, with the remaining plants used for traditional consumption and industrial use, according to Peru’s National Commission for a Drug-Free Life (DEVIDA).

Colombian National Army eradicates coca field


Soldiers with the Colombian National Army recently eradicated a 9.5-hectare field of illegal coca and destroyed a cocaine laboratory used by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) in the Department of Meta.

Troops seized 110 gallons of cocaine in liquid form as well as equipment used to make the drug from the laboratory that was operated by the FARC’s 43rd Front in the municipality of Puerto Rico.

In a separate operation, in the village of El Danubio, Soldiers eradicated a 9.5-hectare field of illegal coca that was being used to produce cocaine by the Eastern Bloc of the FARC, the country’s largest narco-trafficking group. The Army did not immediately announce any arrests.
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