Peru Extends State of Emergency in Five Provinces Due to Shining Path

By Dialogo
January 07, 2013


The Peruvian government extended the state of emergency in five provinces in the northeast for 60 days due to the presence of the Shining Path and drug trafficking guerrilla fronts on January 3, the official state bulletin reported.

The affected areas, which will remain under the control of the Police and the Armed Forces, are the provinces of Marañón, Huamalíes and Leoncio Prado, in the region of Huanuco; the province of Tocache, in the region of San Martín; and the province of Padre Abad, in the Ucayali region.

In these areas, the state of emergency has been in place since September 2011, when the government of President Ollanta Humala had been in power for less than three months.

According to the government, these areas are not only affected by remnant fronts of the Shining Path, but also have “problems with drug trafficking and illegal coca leaf plantations, which is the main source of employment for people in the area.”

While a state of emergency is in force in Peru, the rights to freedom, inviolability of the home, and freedom to assemble, as well as free movement are suspended.



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