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Operation Ágata Boosts Cooperation Between Brazilian Armed Forces and Civilian Agencies

Operation Ágata Boosts Cooperation Between Brazilian Armed Forces and Civilian Agencies

By Dialogo
August 07, 2015

Very good Hi. All of the Armed Forces should be congratulated. Great work. May nature protect you all. Good luck. It's about time they're taking action on the border. Drugs, the biggest problem in this country, should stay over there. Congratulations to our glorious Brazilian Army on the joint initiative to safeguard our borders and prevent the entry of weapons and drugs, as well as other activities related to the initiative. We managed Hallelujah! The Armed Forces need to get out of the barracks and serve on the outskirts of cities and in the countryside, especially in border areas, where Brazil lost its sovereignty a long time ago. Actually, if the Army doesn't protest in the streets, we will be taken out by robbers, regardless of race, financial status or anything else. We are prisoners with no protection. White-collar robbers and street robbers are loose and doing as they please now. What we want is our Armed Forces to always act in accordance with our Constitution; just like they do in France, Sweden, USA, UK, Denmark, Norway, Germany, etc. Congratulations. May they continue becoming more professional. I would like to see that happen. It really would be a great reinforcement for the security of this big event to be held in 2016, another event. Awesome! This operation is wonderful. The most important thing is for our country's military forces to bring themselves closer to society and reduce the fear people have of the military as being mean and negligent. Congratulations for the initiative. We need to demonstrate that we can fulfil the mission. Very nice. The country need more actions like this one to combat violence and drug trafficking in our country and state. Congratulations. Brazil needs to show these drug traffickers who they really are (just drug traffickers) and treat them as such. Let's provide human rights to those who are decent and live with dignity. CONGRATULATIONS! This brings full security against any threat to our homeland. I love it. Construction begins with the foundation. So, the borders are the base of everything. Help from our local and state police, private security, civil police, etc. is not enough. A partnership is needed with other security forces such as the Army, Air Force and Navy. Congratulations, Carlos Sau. Every house begins with the foundation. Therefore, the foundation is the basis of everything. In the case of combating drugs, contraband, weapons, cigarettes, etc., the foundation is the borders of our country. Congratulations General Sá. Congratulations Very nice. This is exactly what the Brazilian Army needs to do, be present and impose respect before organised crime takes over everything. I love peace. Very good, in addition to keeping the military busy with useful social actions. This shows that the military is indeed an arm of society. CONGRATULATIONS Brave warriors, who Brazil appreciates. Brazil first. Another dengue victim in the neighbourhood of J. Amelia. This one was lucky. It's going to be nice to have security. It should be for all moments in Brazil.



From July 22-31, Brazil’s Ministry of Defense conducted the ninth edition of Operation Ágata to disrupt drug trafficking and provide social welfare assistance along the 4,045-kilometer border the country shares with Bolivia and Paraguay.

That area, which encompasses nearly a quarter of Brazil’s total border region, stretches between the district of Vista Alegre do Abunã, in the state of Rondônia, and the city of Foz do Iguaçu, in the state of Paraná.

“Everyone knows that the majority of drugs coming into Brazil passes through the strip where we are operating,” Brazilian Major General Carlos Saú, Chairman of the Joint Staff for the Western Operational Area, said.

In 2015, the Armed Forces allocated military resources throughout the region, which collectively encompasses 166 municipalities in four Brazilian states – Paraná, Mato Grosso do Sul, Mato Grosso, and Rondônia. Operation Ágata mobilized more than 10,000 service members – approximately 5,000 from the Army and 5,000 from the Navy and Air Force (FAB) – plus 450 professionals from federal and state government agencies. The operation also utilized technological tools in the Integrated Border Monitoring System (SISFRON) for the first time.

“We primarily use sensors, radar, and long-range binoculars to monitor the region and capture a variety of data,” Maj. Gen. Saú said. “The technology helps us make decisions on how to better employ our resources.”

Most service members and government officers participating in Operation Ágata were assigned to checkpoints strategically positioned on land and waterways, where they intercepted, searched, and inspected vehicles and ships.

Ten days into the operation, Soldiers and officers had conducted 42,509 vehicle inspections and searches and had seized four tons of marijuana. Soldiers and Troops also confiscated other items, including cigarettes, alcoholic beverages, electronic equipment, fuel, and car parts that organized crime groups were smuggling in an attempt to avoid paying taxes; the goods had an estimated value of 200,567 dollars, according to the Ministry of Defense.

Meanwhile, the FAB, working in cooperation with the National Aviation Agency, inspected eight airfields and checked 60 aircraft for valid documentation, which led to the seizure of one aircraft in Porto Velho, in the state of Rondônia, and 24 issued notifications on document records irregularities with set deadlines for them to be remedied.

Military operation integrates with civilian government agencies


The type of cooperation shown by the FAB and the National Aviation Agency, in which the Military works with civilian government agencies, accounted for about 70 percent of Operation Ágata’s actions, Maj. Gen. Saú said, adding that interagency cooperation, which increased in 2015, is one of the effort's strengths.

“Operation Ágata is not just another initiative bringing together three separate branches of service, the Army, Navy and Air Force. This operation is characterized by combining members of the security forces and government agencies and adding all of their capabilities together for the good of society.”

This collaboration is a consequence of Brazil’s Strategic Border Plan which launched in 2011 with the goal of strengthening the government's presence in border zones through Operation Sentinela and Operation Ágata; the former focuses on intelligence activities, while the latter’s mission concentrates on making interventions on the ground.

Security and social welfare


In addition to improving security, Operation Ágata also provides social welfare assistance for residents in the border regions where the Armed Forces conduct the initiative.

In 2015, for example, 50 service members from the country's Army and Navy teamed with 14 students and parents to completely renovate the Francisco Mendes Sampaio Municipal School in Ladário Mato Grosso do Sul. The 345 students were welcomed back from their mid-year break with painted walls, repaired plumbing and electricity, a new gym floor, and the works of student graffiti artists on exterior walls.

Captain Welliton Lopes dos Santos, Logistics Commander for the Western Operational Area, said the idea to involve students and parents in the renovation was intended to reinforce citizen responsibility at the school.

“We want them to be proud of what they’ve done, and to feel like the space belongs to them.”

During Operation Ágata 9, Troops also provided medical and dental treatment to residents, in addition to distributing medication and providing health care lectures, dental care kits, and recreational activities aimed at children as part of 7,341 civic-social actions.

Partnerships with prefectures and state governments also allowed Troops to issue essential documents, such as identification cards and employment cards, to residents.
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