Movie Depicts the Valor, Professionalism of Honduran Armed Forces

Movie Depicts the Valor, Professionalism of Honduran Armed Forces

By Dialogo
November 14, 2015

I congratulate my Armed Forces because we are all Armed Forces because of this great achievement of showing us courage.That is what our Armed Forces are to us, Hondurans



Hondurans will be able to see their country’s Armed Forces on the big screen in “Fuerzas de Honor” (Forces of Honor), which is scheduled to be released on January 14.

“I am so proud of our Military,” Fernando Ávila, a fan of the film wrote on the film's Facebook page. The movie is “a great opportunity for people to see the work that the Armed Forces does.”

“Forces of Honor” follows the lives of three members of the Armed Forces: Army Major Morazán, Air Force Major Reyes, and Navy Lieutenant Commander Herrera, with their last names paying homage to three of Honduras’s founding fathers – General Francisco Morazán, José Trinidad Reyes, and Dionisio de Herrera. In the movie, Maj. Morazán, Maj. Reyes, and Lt. Cmdr. Herrera, who are played by professional actors, conduct a perilous mission to arrest the leader of a drug cartel. The movie was filmed in locations nationwide, including Puerto Castilla and La Mosquitia in the Caribbean, the nation’s capital of Tegucigalpa, and in Quimistán, in the western department of Santa Bárbara; some scenes were even shot inside homes authorities confiscated from drug kingpins they’ve captured in recent years.

The film stresses the commitment the main characters have to their military service, yet shows the high price they pay to protect their country.

Producers Álvaro Matute and Anuar Vindel recently released the trailer for the film, directed by Honduran Tomás Chi, which is inspired by real-life missions against organized crime groups and includes roles played by service members. Directed by Honduran Tomás Chi, “Forces of Honor” showcases the Military’s triumphs and the daily difficulties it overcomes.

“They are humble men who carry out a titanic and laudable task,” Matute said. “We will show the war on drugs from the perspective of the ones who are fighting for the nation’s security, as well as from the perspective of the people who love them...our main goal with this production is to affirm and increase national pride and the love of country among Hondurans."

Though Matute never served in the Armed Forces, he attended a military-affiliated high school in San Pedro Sula, where former Chief of Staff of the Armed Forces, General Osorio Canales, had once been principal. In 2013, a casual conversation between the two inspired Matute to make a movie about the Military’s counter-narcotics fight.

A realistic depiction


“Forces of Honor” shows the service members’ human side but also stays true to how the Military operates and what kind of equipment it uses.

“People are asking us if the Honduran Navy really has the ships and fast-speed boats they have seen in the teasers or if it’s fiction,” Matute said. “We coordinated all of the filming around real activities and exercises by the Navy, Air Force, and Army. We were ready for whenever the call would come letting us know a clandestine airstrip was going to be blown up in the jungle, or the F-5’s were going to be flown, or there was a training practice in a river or in the ocean.”

Cooperation from the Armed Forces helped the filmmakers produce such a realistic depiction of Military operations.

“The Armed Forces of Honduras is supporting national talent,” explained Colonel Juan Antonio Sánchez, spokesman of the Armed Forces. “The producers of this movie are Honduran actors and we could do no less than to support them...[this is] part of a broader work we are doing to encourage artistic expression in the country.”

To facilitate this cooperation, the production crew worked around the Military’s schedule.

“We had to be patient, but it was worth it because their support was invaluable,” Matute said. ”It would have been impossible to do something like this otherwise.”

Co-producer Vindel added: “With this level of logistics, ‘Forces of Honor’ has no precedent like it in Honduras and quite possibly in Central America. We relied on [the Military] since the beginning to create the story line. We had to interview the peers of the men our three main characters are based on. We could see it was painful for them to talk, but they wanted to honor their fellow soldiers.”
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