Mexico and U.S. Reiterate Commitment to Cooperate Against Drug Cartels

By Dialogo
January 08, 2015



Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto and U.S. President Barack Obama have reiterated their commitment to work cooperatively to fight Mexican drug cartels.

The leaders met January 6 at the White House in the U.S. capital of Washington, D.C., where Obama said the U.S. will continue to work with Mexico to fight narco-trafficking.

“Our commitment is to be a friend and supporter of Mexico in its efforts to eliminate the scourge of violence and the drug cartels that are responsible for so much tragedy inside of Mexico,” Obama said.

U.S. assistance will help Mexico improve security, “especially this clear challenge Mexico has to continue fighting organized crime,” Peña Nieto said.

Mexico and the U.S. have worked together closely in recent years to improve the fight against drug trafficking by transnational criminal organizations, which operate in both countries. Former presidents George W. Bush (U.S.) and Felipe Calderón (Mexico) signed the Merida Initiative – a binational project aimed at fighting organized crime and associated violence while furthering respect for human rights and the rule of law – in October 2007.

Bolivia’s Counter-Narcotics Police destroy large amount of cocaine


In the country’s largest cocaine seizure of 2014, Bolivian Counter-Narcotics police officers incinerated 412 kilograms of cocaine seized from an organized crime group, Deputy Minister of Social Defense Felipe Cáceres said on January 5.

The cocaine was discovered in November hidden inside 3,522 boxes of salt lamps that were part of a trailer-truck’s load. The truck was hauling its cargo, worth more than $15 million, from the Cochabamba region, east of La Paz. Bolivian law enforcement officials suspect the cocaine belonged to a Mexican drug cartel and that it was headed to the United States.

Police arrested two men, whom they have not publicly identified.


Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto and U.S. President Barack Obama have reiterated their commitment to work cooperatively to fight Mexican drug cartels.

The leaders met January 6 at the White House in the U.S. capital of Washington, D.C., where Obama said the U.S. will continue to work with Mexico to fight narco-trafficking.

“Our commitment is to be a friend and supporter of Mexico in its efforts to eliminate the scourge of violence and the drug cartels that are responsible for so much tragedy inside of Mexico,” Obama said.

U.S. assistance will help Mexico improve security, “especially this clear challenge Mexico has to continue fighting organized crime,” Peña Nieto said.

Mexico and the U.S. have worked together closely in recent years to improve the fight against drug trafficking by transnational criminal organizations, which operate in both countries. Former presidents George W. Bush (U.S.) and Felipe Calderón (Mexico) signed the Merida Initiative – a binational project aimed at fighting organized crime and associated violence while furthering respect for human rights and the rule of law – in October 2007.

Bolivia’s Counter-Narcotics Police destroy large amount of cocaine


In the country’s largest cocaine seizure of 2014, Bolivian Counter-Narcotics police officers incinerated 412 kilograms of cocaine seized from an organized crime group, Deputy Minister of Social Defense Felipe Cáceres said on January 5.

The cocaine was discovered in November hidden inside 3,522 boxes of salt lamps that were part of a trailer-truck’s load. The truck was hauling its cargo, worth more than $15 million, from the Cochabamba region, east of La Paz. Bolivian law enforcement officials suspect the cocaine belonged to a Mexican drug cartel and that it was headed to the United States.

Police arrested two men, whom they have not publicly identified.
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