Informants for Los Zetas Cartel Arrested in Mexico

By Dialogo
May 14, 2012

A group of four minors, including a 12-year old, in addition to a 30-year-old man, who acted as informants for the Los Zetas cartel, have been arrested in Apodaca, a locality in northern Mexico, the State Investigation Agency announced on May 10.

“The two juveniles, 12 and 16 years old, accompanied by two 18-year-old women and a man who said he was in charge of them, were arrested by municipal agents” for monitoring the movements of Military and police personnel on behalf of Los Zetas, the state agency said in a statement.

The 30-year-old man who was arrested said in his initial statement that he received about 1,033 dollars a month to coordinate the young people, who were each paid about 664 dollars a month.

These individuals, known in the drug-trafficking world as “halcones” [falcons], were arrested in the municipality of Apodaca, which forms part of the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Mexico’s third-largest city.

The arrests took place when police officers were conducting a patrol and detected the juveniles making telephone calls and sending text messages in a suspicious manner. On searching their mobile phones, they found that they were giving information to Los Zetas, a dangerous criminal organization formed by Military deserters that operates in several states in the country.

Twenty other people, including a 63-year-old woman, who performed the same task were arrested on May 8, in the course of several operations carried out in recent days in Nuevo León (in northern Mexico), the capital of which is Monterrey.

The states of northern and northeastern Mexico, including Nuevo León, are experiencing a rising wave of violence linked to struggles between drug cartels, in this case between the Gulf Cartel and their former allies Los Zetas, created in the 1990s.

Over 50,000 people have died in Mexico as a consequence of clashes between drug-trafficking cartels and a Military offensive in the last five years, including an undetermined number of people without ties to criminal organizations.





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