Guatemala Uses Cameras to Fight Organized Crime

By Dialogo
May 06, 2015



Guatemala’s Interior Ministry recently installed 1,133 surveillance cameras in the Department of Guatemala to aid the El Milagro Task Force in its fight against narcotrafficking and organized crime groups, Mixco Mayor Otto Pérez Leal said.

Government authorities placed the cameras in “strategic locations” in the municipality of Mixco, which has a population of about 452,000 residents; they supplement 87 others which were already in place to help security forces keep track of illegal activities. Each is equipped with facial recognition technology, and has the ability to zoom in and out; they're durable and work in any type of weather.

The El Milagro Task Force, which is made up of members of the Guatemalan Army and National Civil Police (PNC), will use the surveillance system to respond quickly to drug trafficking and other organized crime activity. The cameras are part of President Otto Pérez Molina’s plan to improve security throughout the Central American nation. The Ministry of the Interior has installed 10,000 of them in Guatemala City and in municipalities with the highest crime rates since taking office in January 2012.

Colombian National Army destroys 2 cocaine laboratories


Troops with the Vulacono Task Force's 30th Brigade recently destroyed one cocaine laboratory belonging to the drug trafficking organization Clan Úsuga and another operated by the Luis Enrique León Guerra Front of the National Liberation Army (ELN) in the Department of Norte de Santander.

Soldiers seized 30 kilograms of cocaine, 110 gallons of coca syrup, 10 kilograms of potassium permanganate, 75 gallons of hydrochloric acid, 525 gallons of acetone, and other supplies and equipment from the two laboratories; but the Army did not immediately report whether they captured any suspects in connection with the operations.

The ELN is the country’s second-largest guerrilla group, behind the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). Both illegal organizations use proceeds from narcotrafficking to fund their terrorist activities. The Army continues to ask residents to use free hotlines 146 and 147 to report any suspicious activity.


Guatemala’s Interior Ministry recently installed 1,133 surveillance cameras in the Department of Guatemala to aid the El Milagro Task Force in its fight against narcotrafficking and organized crime groups, Mixco Mayor Otto Pérez Leal said.

Government authorities placed the cameras in “strategic locations” in the municipality of Mixco, which has a population of about 452,000 residents; they supplement 87 others which were already in place to help security forces keep track of illegal activities. Each is equipped with facial recognition technology, and has the ability to zoom in and out; they're durable and work in any type of weather.

The El Milagro Task Force, which is made up of members of the Guatemalan Army and National Civil Police (PNC), will use the surveillance system to respond quickly to drug trafficking and other organized crime activity. The cameras are part of President Otto Pérez Molina’s plan to improve security throughout the Central American nation. The Ministry of the Interior has installed 10,000 of them in Guatemala City and in municipalities with the highest crime rates since taking office in January 2012.

Colombian National Army destroys 2 cocaine laboratories


Troops with the Vulacono Task Force's 30th Brigade recently destroyed one cocaine laboratory belonging to the drug trafficking organization Clan Úsuga and another operated by the Luis Enrique León Guerra Front of the National Liberation Army (ELN) in the Department of Norte de Santander.

Soldiers seized 30 kilograms of cocaine, 110 gallons of coca syrup, 10 kilograms of potassium permanganate, 75 gallons of hydrochloric acid, 525 gallons of acetone, and other supplies and equipment from the two laboratories; but the Army did not immediately report whether they captured any suspects in connection with the operations.

The ELN is the country’s second-largest guerrilla group, behind the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). Both illegal organizations use proceeds from narcotrafficking to fund their terrorist activities. The Army continues to ask residents to use free hotlines 146 and 147 to report any suspicious activity.
Excellent news and wishing you much success and may God be with you... Greetings from Colombia, dear land
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