El Salvador’s Military Uses Technology to Train Troops

El Salvador’s Military Uses Technology to Train Troops

By Dialogo
March 10, 2015





The Computerized Tactical Training Center (CETAC) of the Armed Forces of El Salvador (FAES, in Spanish) uses a simulator to test tactical and operational decision-making by Soldiers under pressure in combat and disaster situations.

“We have a valuable technological tool that allows us to virtually train our Troops using simulations of real-life situations through precise mathematical models and complex calculations based on the mapping of El Salvador,” explained Colonel Andrés Zamora, an engineer who serves as the center’s director.

Housed in the modern Doctrine and Military Education Command (CODEM) building in San Salvador, CETAC has the capacity to simultaneously train two 36-member teams, as well as a group director who guides the exercises.

The teams can undergo combat simulations with or without prior planning, with actions under development, jointly, or in a combined manner. There are also practice sessions, as well as exercises involving crisis management and disaster assistance to civilians.

The simulators are also programmed to generate concentrations of civilians, perform engineering work – such as the installation of bridges or the repair of obstructed roadways – and provide statistics regarding the personnel and materials used in the exercise.

In many situations in the field, “the unit commanders must decide what to do with fallen Soldiers, whether to evacuate them or bury them in the field,” said Col. Zamora. "If the commander decides to carry the bodies, the simulator can update troop morale and the Soldiers will not perform in the same manner. This is how it is in reality.”

The advantages of the simulated events are that they allow for control over the environment, time, threats, Troop displacement, resources, and terrain.
Consequently, the simulations result in decreased costs for the FAES, when compared to actual simulations with Soldiers in the field.

Technological advances in training


The Salvadoran Military is taking advantage of technological advances that have provided militaries with opportunities to conduct challenging training exercises without going into the field.

Most Armed Forces have increased simulation exercises in recent years, according to Carmen Elena Gallardo, an engineer who is a member of CETAC's Research and Development team.

“Without question there have been major technological advances that have influenced the process, but the primary cause of this increase has been the confidence in the help that simulations can provide in a variety of fields, from instruction and training, to evaluation, planning and decision-making,” she explained.

These applications often begin as video games, but due to their popularity and the level of immersion that can be achieved, versions have been developed for Military exercises.

“We have established procedures that guide the teaching toward integrated education, awakening the interest in research and incorporating modern technology into the learning system,” Col. Zamora said.

International scope


The simulations are aimed at strengthening the conduct of combat troops – with the application of International Humanitarian Law (IHL) and the International Law of Armed Conflict (ILAC) – as well as
supporting the civilian population in national emergencies, according to CODEM commander Major General José Mauricio Villacorta.

“Because our exercises take into account aspects of international legislation, we have carried out simulations with military teams from the region and held exchange visits to deepen the learning through the simulators,” he said.

The first ILAC regional warfare simulation was carried out in July 2000, with the participation of military teams from the seven countries of Central America and the International Red Cross. The exercise was repeated in 2005 with the inclusion of Mexico, the Dominican Republic, and Peru.

The Armies of Colombia, Brazil, and Guatemala have visited CETAC to participate in various training exercises.

"The main objective of CETAC is for the commanders to make consistent successive decisions, structure plans, execute them, and learn to coordinate and control actions on tight deadlines, promoting teamwork, avoiding duplicated efforts and maximizing the efficiency of the available means," Maj. Gen. Villacorta said.








The Computerized Tactical Training Center (CETAC) of the Armed Forces of El Salvador (FAES, in Spanish) uses a simulator to test tactical and operational decision-making by Soldiers under pressure in combat and disaster situations.

“We have a valuable technological tool that allows us to virtually train our Troops using simulations of real-life situations through precise mathematical models and complex calculations based on the mapping of El Salvador,” explained Colonel Andrés Zamora, an engineer who serves as the center’s director.

Housed in the modern Doctrine and Military Education Command (CODEM) building in San Salvador, CETAC has the capacity to simultaneously train two 36-member teams, as well as a group director who guides the exercises.

The teams can undergo combat simulations with or without prior planning, with actions under development, jointly, or in a combined manner. There are also practice sessions, as well as exercises involving crisis management and disaster assistance to civilians.

The simulators are also programmed to generate concentrations of civilians, perform engineering work – such as the installation of bridges or the repair of obstructed roadways – and provide statistics regarding the personnel and materials used in the exercise.

In many situations in the field, “the unit commanders must decide what to do with fallen Soldiers, whether to evacuate them or bury them in the field,” said Col. Zamora. "If the commander decides to carry the bodies, the simulator can update troop morale and the Soldiers will not perform in the same manner. This is how it is in reality.”

The advantages of the simulated events are that they allow for control over the environment, time, threats, Troop displacement, resources, and terrain.
Consequently, the simulations result in decreased costs for the FAES, when compared to actual simulations with Soldiers in the field.

Technological advances in training


The Salvadoran Military is taking advantage of technological advances that have provided militaries with opportunities to conduct challenging training exercises without going into the field.

Most Armed Forces have increased simulation exercises in recent years, according to Carmen Elena Gallardo, an engineer who is a member of CETAC's Research and Development team.

“Without question there have been major technological advances that have influenced the process, but the primary cause of this increase has been the confidence in the help that simulations can provide in a variety of fields, from instruction and training, to evaluation, planning and decision-making,” she explained.

These applications often begin as video games, but due to their popularity and the level of immersion that can be achieved, versions have been developed for Military exercises.

“We have established procedures that guide the teaching toward integrated education, awakening the interest in research and incorporating modern technology into the learning system,” Col. Zamora said.

International scope


The simulations are aimed at strengthening the conduct of combat troops – with the application of International Humanitarian Law (IHL) and the International Law of Armed Conflict (ILAC) – as well as
supporting the civilian population in national emergencies, according to CODEM commander Major General José Mauricio Villacorta.

“Because our exercises take into account aspects of international legislation, we have carried out simulations with military teams from the region and held exchange visits to deepen the learning through the simulators,” he said.

The first ILAC regional warfare simulation was carried out in July 2000, with the participation of military teams from the seven countries of Central America and the International Red Cross. The exercise was repeated in 2005 with the inclusion of Mexico, the Dominican Republic, and Peru.

The Armies of Colombia, Brazil, and Guatemala have visited CETAC to participate in various training exercises.

"The main objective of CETAC is for the commanders to make consistent successive decisions, structure plans, execute them, and learn to coordinate and control actions on tight deadlines, promoting teamwork, avoiding duplicated efforts and maximizing the efficiency of the available means," Maj. Gen. Villacorta said.




Impressive!!!!!!!! No doubt.
But the theory is also fundamentally one of the great factors
which .
it is necessary to carry them out on the battlefield. Especially in areas such as Kabul, Afghanistan. Otherwise, everything is perfect. Brotherly regards and keep on going with more skills for the good of our nation
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