Colombia to Extradite Narco-trafficker Daniel Rendón Herrera

By Dialogo
December 19, 2014



Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos recently signed a request by U.S. federal law enforcement officials to extradite alleged narco-trafficker Daniel Rendón Herrera to the United States.

Rendón Herrera, also known as “Don Mario,” is wanted by the Southern District Court of New York on charges of conspiring to traffic drugs and supporting a terrorist group. He was a member of the United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC) before leaving in 2006 to start Clan Úsuga, which became one of the country’s most powerful organized crime groups.

If convicted on the narcotics conspiracy charge, Don Mario faces between a mandatory minimum sentence of 10 years in prison and a maximum sentence of life behind bars. He faces another 15 years in prison if he’s found guilty of supporting a foreign terrorist organization.

The Colombian Supreme Court ruled in 2010 that Don Mario couldn’t be extradited until he took part in Colombia’s reparations process, according to the Justice and Peace Law, which provides a degree of amnesty for those who testify about what occurred during the conflict. Though he told the Justice and Peace Court what he knew about the crimes committed by numerous AUC leaders, he also admitted to trafficking narcotics and committing other crimes after he quit the AUC in 2006. In 2013, the Justice and Peace Court ruled that he could be extradited to face charges for those crimes.

Don Mario was designated a drug kingpin pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act by U.S. President Barack Obama in May 2009. He’s accused of having “extensive drug transportation networks throughout Colombia that facilitated the shipment of cocaine to the United States and Europe,” according to the U.S. Treasury Department.

In 2010, U.S. federal law enforcement authorities named Don Mario’s brother, Freddy Rendón Herrera – a former AUC leader known as “El Alemán” – as a drug kingpin as well. The two brothers face federal narcotics importation and narco-terrorism conspiracy charges in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York pursuant to a June 2009 indictment.

Additionally, in 2013, a Colombian judge sentenced El Alemán to 20 years in prison for the 2002 disappearance and murder of Marco Aurelio Osorio Manco, a farmer from the town of Dabeiba in the Department of Antioquia. However, the Colombian Supreme Court has blocked El Alemán’s extradition to the United States.

Drug gang linked to Mexican cartel and Mara Salvatrucha busted in Canada


The Alberta Law Enforcement Response Team (ALERT) said on December 17 it has captured four suspects who were allegedly aligned with a Mexican drug cartel and Mara Salvatrucha, a street gang based in Central America also known as MS-13.

ALERT agents suspect the four – three men and a woman – were working for La Familia Michoacana, a Mexican drug cartel, and MS-13. They were allegedly operating in the Canadian province of Alberta.

On December 11, police arrested José Antonio Monterrey, the leader of the group, while he attempted to board a flight at the Edmonton International Airport. Law enforcement officers took three of his alleged associates – Peter Alan Griffon, Cody Sterling Tremblett, and Penny Sue Fleming – into custody during raids at their respective residences. Each suspect faces multiple criminal charges – among them drug possession, possession of a prohibited weapon, and careless use of a firearm.

“Their presence in Alberta should be of concern to Albertans,” ALERT Inspector Darcy Strang told reporters. “Their connection to Mexican cartels and MS-13 creates a linkage to violence that is incomprehensible to most. The potential for conflict with existing crime groups is inherent in their existence.”

Police seized CA$600,000 ($516,595) worth of narcotics, including five kilograms of cocaine, 2.7 kilograms of ecstasy and two kilograms of substances used to mix with narcotics and oxycodone pills, during searches at three residences in Edmonton. They also confiscated CA$45,000 ($37,745) in cash, two .22 caliber rifles, a .44 caliber Desert Eagle handgun, a sawed-off shotgun, thousands of bullets and several body armor suits.

“These two weapons and the sawed off shoguns are not used for bird hunting – they are used for human hunting,” Strang told reporters. “This is a group that was armed and ready to defend what they had ... and ready to take over any other group that tried to take them over.”


Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos recently signed a request by U.S. federal law enforcement officials to extradite alleged narco-trafficker Daniel Rendón Herrera to the United States.

Rendón Herrera, also known as “Don Mario,” is wanted by the Southern District Court of New York on charges of conspiring to traffic drugs and supporting a terrorist group. He was a member of the United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC) before leaving in 2006 to start Clan Úsuga, which became one of the country’s most powerful organized crime groups.

If convicted on the narcotics conspiracy charge, Don Mario faces between a mandatory minimum sentence of 10 years in prison and a maximum sentence of life behind bars. He faces another 15 years in prison if he’s found guilty of supporting a foreign terrorist organization.

The Colombian Supreme Court ruled in 2010 that Don Mario couldn’t be extradited until he took part in Colombia’s reparations process, according to the Justice and Peace Law, which provides a degree of amnesty for those who testify about what occurred during the conflict. Though he told the Justice and Peace Court what he knew about the crimes committed by numerous AUC leaders, he also admitted to trafficking narcotics and committing other crimes after he quit the AUC in 2006. In 2013, the Justice and Peace Court ruled that he could be extradited to face charges for those crimes.

Don Mario was designated a drug kingpin pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act by U.S. President Barack Obama in May 2009. He’s accused of having “extensive drug transportation networks throughout Colombia that facilitated the shipment of cocaine to the United States and Europe,” according to the U.S. Treasury Department.

In 2010, U.S. federal law enforcement authorities named Don Mario’s brother, Freddy Rendón Herrera – a former AUC leader known as “El Alemán” – as a drug kingpin as well. The two brothers face federal narcotics importation and narco-terrorism conspiracy charges in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York pursuant to a June 2009 indictment.

Additionally, in 2013, a Colombian judge sentenced El Alemán to 20 years in prison for the 2002 disappearance and murder of Marco Aurelio Osorio Manco, a farmer from the town of Dabeiba in the Department of Antioquia. However, the Colombian Supreme Court has blocked El Alemán’s extradition to the United States.

Drug gang linked to Mexican cartel and Mara Salvatrucha busted in Canada


The Alberta Law Enforcement Response Team (ALERT) said on December 17 it has captured four suspects who were allegedly aligned with a Mexican drug cartel and Mara Salvatrucha, a street gang based in Central America also known as MS-13.

ALERT agents suspect the four – three men and a woman – were working for La Familia Michoacana, a Mexican drug cartel, and MS-13. They were allegedly operating in the Canadian province of Alberta.

On December 11, police arrested José Antonio Monterrey, the leader of the group, while he attempted to board a flight at the Edmonton International Airport. Law enforcement officers took three of his alleged associates – Peter Alan Griffon, Cody Sterling Tremblett, and Penny Sue Fleming – into custody during raids at their respective residences. Each suspect faces multiple criminal charges – among them drug possession, possession of a prohibited weapon, and careless use of a firearm.

“Their presence in Alberta should be of concern to Albertans,” ALERT Inspector Darcy Strang told reporters. “Their connection to Mexican cartels and MS-13 creates a linkage to violence that is incomprehensible to most. The potential for conflict with existing crime groups is inherent in their existence.”

Police seized CA$600,000 ($516,595) worth of narcotics, including five kilograms of cocaine, 2.7 kilograms of ecstasy and two kilograms of substances used to mix with narcotics and oxycodone pills, during searches at three residences in Edmonton. They also confiscated CA$45,000 ($37,745) in cash, two .22 caliber rifles, a .44 caliber Desert Eagle handgun, a sawed-off shotgun, thousands of bullets and several body armor suits.

“These two weapons and the sawed off shoguns are not used for bird hunting – they are used for human hunting,” Strang told reporters. “This is a group that was armed and ready to defend what they had ... and ready to take over any other group that tried to take them over.”
How much petty cash did it cost the Peruvian budget for investigations and "anti-narco" actions to trap bosses who are looking for international money? I want to comment on some photos with you and if you want, you can do it with me too I think the news you post is very good. It is very useful to Colombians
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