Colombia Arrests Alleged Narco-trafficker

By Dialogo
March 23, 2015



Agents with the Colombian National Police’s counter-narcotics unit captured a man who is on the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA’s) list of the 50 most-wanted drug traffickers in the world.

The suspect is the alleged leader of Yemalla, an organization suspected of transporting huge shipments of narcotics through Central America and Mexico by working with the Sinaloa Cartel, a transnational criminal organization, Colombian police said.

They arrested him in the northern department of La Guajira along with two alleged members of his narcotrafficking organization. The U.S. is seeking extradition for all three suspects, who allegedly shipped cocaine aboard speedboats that left from the departments of La Guajira and Magdalena.

The leader of the gang allegedly started trafficking narcotics in 2000 when he joined a criminal organization led by Daniel “El Loco” Barrera, who was captured while making a call in a telephone booth in San Cristobal, Venezuela, in September 2012. El Loco was sent to Colombia in November 2012, where he was imprisoned until his July 2013 extradition to the United States. There, he faces the possibility of life in prison after pleading guilty to conspiring to manufacture cocaine, knowing it would be imported into the U.S. and other countries.

The recently arrested suspect allegedly replaced El Loco as the leader of the organized crime group and extended “his tentacles to the neighboring country of Venezuela, thus becoming one of the most powerful drug traffickers on Colombia’s Caribbean coast,” the Colombian National Police reported.

Paraguay’s Joint Task Force eradicates 4 hectares of marijuana


Paraguay’s Joint Task Force (FTC) along with personnel from the Attorney General's Office recently destroyed four hectares of marijuana and a camp in the department of San Pedro.

The FTC also seized from the camp equipment used to grow marijuana, booby traps, and shotgun shells among other supplies and equipment from the camp.

Authorities did not immediately report whether Troops captured any suspects in connection with the raid on the camp, which had the capacity to house eight people.

Guatemalan security forces seize large amounts of drugs and cash in 2014


Guatemalan security forces seized more than $13.08 million quetzals ($1.7 million) worth of drugs in 2014, according to a report by the General Department of Anti-Narcotics Analysis and Information (SGAIA) of the National Civil Police (PNC).

The eradication of poppy plants accounted for $12.2 million quetzals ($1.59 million) of the total amount of confiscated narcotics. Poppy contains opium, which is the main ingredient used to produce heroin.

Security forces also seized in 2014 $8.4 million worth of drug money in U.S. currency, 96 guns, 6,179 rounds of ammunition, numerous Global Positioning Systems (GPS), digital cameras, and scales. Additionally, they captured 361 drug trafficking suspects, including 331 Guatemalans, 13 Colombians, five Ecuadorans, five Salvadorans, four Mexicans and three Nicaraguans.


Agents with the Colombian National Police’s counter-narcotics unit captured a man who is on the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA’s) list of the 50 most-wanted drug traffickers in the world.

The suspect is the alleged leader of Yemalla, an organization suspected of transporting huge shipments of narcotics through Central America and Mexico by working with the Sinaloa Cartel, a transnational criminal organization, Colombian police said.

They arrested him in the northern department of La Guajira along with two alleged members of his narcotrafficking organization. The U.S. is seeking extradition for all three suspects, who allegedly shipped cocaine aboard speedboats that left from the departments of La Guajira and Magdalena.

The leader of the gang allegedly started trafficking narcotics in 2000 when he joined a criminal organization led by Daniel “El Loco” Barrera, who was captured while making a call in a telephone booth in San Cristobal, Venezuela, in September 2012. El Loco was sent to Colombia in November 2012, where he was imprisoned until his July 2013 extradition to the United States. There, he faces the possibility of life in prison after pleading guilty to conspiring to manufacture cocaine, knowing it would be imported into the U.S. and other countries.

The recently arrested suspect allegedly replaced El Loco as the leader of the organized crime group and extended “his tentacles to the neighboring country of Venezuela, thus becoming one of the most powerful drug traffickers on Colombia’s Caribbean coast,” the Colombian National Police reported.

Paraguay’s Joint Task Force eradicates 4 hectares of marijuana


Paraguay’s Joint Task Force (FTC) along with personnel from the Attorney General's Office recently destroyed four hectares of marijuana and a camp in the department of San Pedro.

The FTC also seized from the camp equipment used to grow marijuana, booby traps, and shotgun shells among other supplies and equipment from the camp.

Authorities did not immediately report whether Troops captured any suspects in connection with the raid on the camp, which had the capacity to house eight people.

Guatemalan security forces seize large amounts of drugs and cash in 2014


Guatemalan security forces seized more than $13.08 million quetzals ($1.7 million) worth of drugs in 2014, according to a report by the General Department of Anti-Narcotics Analysis and Information (SGAIA) of the National Civil Police (PNC).

The eradication of poppy plants accounted for $12.2 million quetzals ($1.59 million) of the total amount of confiscated narcotics. Poppy contains opium, which is the main ingredient used to produce heroin.

Security forces also seized in 2014 $8.4 million worth of drug money in U.S. currency, 96 guns, 6,179 rounds of ammunition, numerous Global Positioning Systems (GPS), digital cameras, and scales. Additionally, they captured 361 drug trafficking suspects, including 331 Guatemalans, 13 Colombians, five Ecuadorans, five Salvadorans, four Mexicans and three Nicaraguans.
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