Brazilian Army Opens Simulation Center

Brazilian Army Opens Simulation Center

By Roberto Caiafa/Diálogo
April 11, 2017

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Whatsapp : 509-37748846 The Brazilian Army’s Training Evaluation Center (CAAdEx, per its Portuguese acronym), will begin the testing and assessment phase of the simulation equipment by the middle of 2017. The inaugural ceremony and equipment demonstration took place on March 16th in the presence of General Paulo Humberto César de Oliveira, head of the Land Operations Command (COTER, per its Portuguese acronym), along with other Army officials. The remodeled facilities house a set of rooms designed for constructive and virtual simulation. The Light Weaponry Shooting System occupies the largest room and provides virtual training on shooting rifles and pistols in a controlled environment, enabling constant, facilitated improvement while eliminating risks and minimizing costs. The constructive simulation makes use of COMBATER software designed by RustCon, a Brazilian consulting firm, to train military personnel. It can be used for unit, brigade, and division-level exercises, and allows combat operations to be simulated across an array of operational environments in Brazilian territory. These activities are monitored by the exercise’s management in a separate room, with servers and terminals at the disposal of the controllers. “The unit is constantly searching for the best technology,” said Colonel Urubatã Muterle Gama, commander of CAAdEx. “In a little over 11 months, we remodeled the facilities and delivered a fully equipped simulation center for virtual and constructive simulations. In our live simulation, the latest equipment and instruments are expected to exponentially increase our efficiency because we’ll now be able to provide the unit with highly valuable training and exercises, an essential need,” he said. New equipment A shipment of supplies arrived at the CAAdEx Simulation Division on March 3rd. Among these newly tested technologies are a set of G11 CTC/MOUT Gladiator vests used by combat troops in live simulations; new integrated laser units, the “weapon” for resetting the vest used by the observers, controllers, and evaluators; hand grenade simulators, and new laser scopes mounted on the weapon’s barrel to interact with the Gladiator and other devices. The equipment’s special feature is its ability to be mounted on any of the customer’s service weapons. One of the new system’s features is that it can do away with the cartridge’s report to commence the firing process, which translates to less wear and tear on the weapon, less ammunition in training, and a highly realistic scenario without diminishing the quality of results. The shot’s accuracy is assured by another piece of equipment – the Aiming Alignment Unit – a station for gauging and calibrating the laser on each weapon given to a soldier. Aiming is done once the equipment is on. The shot and equipment report on the necessary adjustments, which should be introduced with a small tool that is part of the kit. One more verification shot and the system is calibrated for live combat simulation. The other equipment provided includes the Wi-Fi signal transmitter/receiving devices, which come in a miniature size, to be placed in confined areas within vehicles, as well as larger, easy-to-assemble tower sizes for retransmitting signals in the field. These are called Mobile Field Transponders, which have a range of 1.4 kilometers and can be spread across the instruction area creating an integrated online perimeter with map georeferencing and nominal control of the soldiers, transports, and vehicles. According to the manufacturer’s data, up to 1,000 service members can interact in a live simulation connected by the system, or a combination of soldiers, transports, and armored vehicles depending on the sensors that are installed. Simulation novelties at CAAdEx In order to interact with these domestic technologies, and with the goal of streamlining logistical procedures, the CAAdEx team demonstrated two new vehicles made at the center to the COTER entourage. One is the Mobile Command and Control Unit, designed to accompany live-simulation field exercises with communication resources and transmission/reception of color images using tablets and cameras that a soldier can carry. The tablet camera and backpack camera, with a signal retransmission unit, record the dynamics of simulated combat in real time, allowing the exercise’s controllers and judges to interact and gauge results practically and reliably. This unit can also use a remotely manned aircraft, such as a drone. One of the service members in the vehicle’s crew is trained as a pilot. With the drone retransmitting images in real time, the user has a wide view of what is happening on the ground from a privileged point of view. The other vehicle is a Mobile Supply Reserve, configured internally with a series of small divisions and shelves adapted for each type of equipment, with a climate-controlled interior divided into sections, employing a creative rod-anchored system to deliver vests to the trainees, and spaces for compartments that protect the equipment during movement, transport, and storage. The equipment is delivered to each soldier with biometric identification and a barcode, all connected to a network with its own signal. These two vehicles are expected to provide greater agility and efficacy for off-site actions, improving logistics and control of the equipment’s wear and tear. “A wide range of possibilities for performing live simulation field exercises are being developed and studied at CAAdEx,” said Gen. Paulo Humberto. “With increasing demands for training professional troops to be deployed in the country and abroad on peace and similar missions, these technologies are extremely important.” Simulations also can be done in a network with other Army units, such as the Officer Training School in Rio de Janeiro, the Agulhas Negras Military Academy in Resende, in the state of Rio de Janeiro, and the Santa Maria Center for Training and Assessment-South in the state of Rio Grande do Sul.
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