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Argentine Rear Admiral to Become New Coordinator of the South Atlantic Maritime Area

Argentine Rear Admiral to Become New Coordinator of the South Atlantic Maritime Area

By Dialogo
March 25, 2010

On March 26, at 10:30 a.m., in the Noble Hall of the “Almirante Tamandaré” Building, located on Praça Barão de Ladário in downtown Rio de Janeiro, the ceremony transferring the position of Coordinator of the South Atlantic Maritime Area (CAMAS) will take place. The ceremony will be presided over by the Commander of the Brazilian Navy, Julio Soares de Moura Neto with the presence of the members of the Naval Commandants Committee of the South Atlantic Maritime Area (AMAS), made up of the of the commanding officers of the Argentine, Brazilian, Paraguayan, and Uruguayan navies. The CAMAS position, currently occupied by Brazilian Rear Admiral José Aloysio de Melo Pinto, will be transferred to Argentine Rear Admiral Gastón Fernando Erice. Throughout the last forty-two years this position has rotated among admirals from Argentina, Brazil, and Uruguay. At the end of the 1960s, as a result of the mutual understanding and cooperation among the Southern Cone navies, the area known internationally as the South Atlantic Maritime Area (AMAS) was activated. The organization of the area was structured to support the Plan for Coordinating the Defense of Inter-American Maritime Traffic, created under the umbrella of the Inter-American Reciprocal Assistance Treaty (TIAR). The purpose of this plan is to coordinate the Latin American countries’ activities related to the direction, control and protection of continental maritime traffic, in order to contribute to ensuring the usability of maritime communications routes of interest. In a scenario of growing importance for our maritime area, known as the “Blue Amazon,” where ever-more-important oil fields are located and with the prospect of exploring pre-salt petroleum deposits, understanding, cooperation, and exchange of information among the navies bordering on the South Atlantic are fundamental to countering the so-called “new threats” (terrorism, piracy, smuggling, drug trafficking, and environmental crimes). While under Brazilian leadership, CAMAS focused on expanding the exchange of information among AMAS navies, on developing new procedures, and on developing and applying modern technology for maritime naval traffic control. Distinguished members of the maritime community and government representatives will participate in the ceremony, along with various officials and naval officers from Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay.
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