2012-06-15

Guatemala and Honduras Agree to Reinforce Measures against Drug Trafficking

Guatemalan President Otto Perez (R) shakes hands with Honduran President Porfirio Lobo after a meeting at the presidential residence in Guatemala City on June 13, 2012 to discuss security and drug trafficking issues. (Photo: AFP/Luis Soto)

Guatemalan President Otto Perez (R) shakes hands with Honduran President Porfirio Lobo after a meeting at the presidential residence in Guatemala City on June 13, 2012 to discuss security and drug trafficking issues. (Photo: AFP/Luis Soto)

AFP

Following a brief meeting in the Guatemalan capital, Guatemalan President Otto Pérez and Honduran President Porfirio Lobo agreed on June 13 to do better in the fight against drug trafficking and crime, which are heavily impacting their countries and all of Central America.

“We’ve addressed issues that we Central Americans share as a challenge, increasingly strengthening exchanges of information and making that joint effort to combat transnational crime,” Lobo stated at a joint press conference with Pérez at the Presidential House.

“We also addressed how to improve security in order to eliminate blind (illegal) border crossings” through a binational police force, or a trinational one if El Salvador joins, the Honduran president added.

Lobo recalled that they are working together with the United States on the strategy known as Operation Martillo, focused on containing the entry of drugs into the region.

He explained that all frontal assaults on drug trafficking should be supported by prevention strategies.

“People talk about how we’re more effective together, not on the combat side, but on the prevention side (…),” the Honduran president specified.

Lobo and his Salvadoran counterpart, Mauricio Funes, declined to attend a Central American summit held in Guatemala on March 24 in order to analyze Pérez’s proposal.

“We know that this problem (of drug trafficking) is not only a Guatemalan problem or only a Honduran problem; it’s a problem that we share in Central America, as transit countries for drug trafficking,” Pérez said.

“Central America’s problems are problems that unite us; in addition, we have many more points of convergence, of union, than points where we could diverge,” Pérez concluded.

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