2011-10-05

New Film Reveals How Colombian Agents Infiltrated FARC Jungle Hideouts

Animation is used for special effects in “Infiltrados,” a documentary that tells the story of highly trained intelligence agents who infiltrated the FARC terrorist network in Colombia. [Univisión]

Animation is used for special effects in “Infiltrados,” a documentary that tells the story of highly trained intelligence agents who infiltrated the FARC terrorist network in Colombia. [Univisión]

By Larry Luxner

Mauricio was the boat operator. Nelson wandered deep into the jungle. Freddy the city boy posed as a campesino. And Liliana, Freddy’s fictitious wife, served drinks at the local saloon.

All four were highly trained intelligence agents sent to infiltrate one of the world’s most ruthless terrorist organizations. And for the first time, all four tell their stories in an 80-minute documentary that debuted late last month on the Spanish-language Univisión TV network. It has since been viewed by millions of people throughout the Americas.

“Infiltrados” is an intensely personal look at how the Colombian national police and its intelligence division, DIPOL [Dirección de Inteligencia de la Policía Nacional] carried out undercover missions that brought down two of the top leaders of Colombia’s FARC [Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia].

The first, Operation Fénix, took place in March 2008 in Ecuador, just over the border from Colombia, and ended the life of FARC’s second-in-command, Raúl Reyes. The second, Operation Sodoma, was carried out in September 2010 in a guerrilla encampment 150 miles southwest of Bogotá, killing the commander of FARC’s powerful Eastern Bloc, Victor Julio Suárez Rojas, alias “Mono Jojoy.”

Featuring exclusive, real-life footage captured under dangerous circumstances, “Infiltrados” is also a human-interest story that took Colombian writer and director Juan Rendón a year to put together. He says his latest work portrays the success of Colombia's police and military, “and the brave men and women who went undercover” for the sake of their country.

“My documentary tries to show that intelligence comes down to people and human relations,” the 35-year-old filmmaker told Diálogo following a screening of the movie. “That’s the way it’s always been done, and it’s the way it’ll always be done: getting the enemy to trust you. I don’t think any tactical secrets are revealed here — certainly nothing that would ruin any upcoming operations — except in the way these personal relations were constructed.”

Since 1996, the film’s narrator explains, FARC terrorists have kidnapped more than 700 people. A U.S. government official says that the rebels now export 60 percent of the cocaine that reaches the United States — and that with the help of Mexican cartels, earn between $500 million and $600 million a year through drug exports.

Yet before Operations Fénix and Sodoma, Raúl Reyes and Mono Jojoy were sheltered by a jungle canopy so thick that not even satellite images could penetrate their cover.

Douglas Farah, an adjunct fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, said Colombia began using intelligence agents to infiltrate the FARC leadership in the late 1990s, when it was clear that the country was on the verge of becoming a “narco-democracy.”

“This documentary puts a human face on several individuals who did their jobs at great personal risk,” said Farah, a former Washington Post reporter who has written two books on drug trafficking. “Colombia has much to teach us in this regard. It’s become a leader in the field of human intelligence. The police, the military and the political leadership were all able to work together in Colombia towards a common goal. And Colombia over time underwent a profound transformation from the brink of catastrophe to economic growth and prosperity.”

Narrated by Univisón News anchors María Elena Salinas (in English) and Jorge Ramos (in Spanish), “Infiltrados” includes interviews with both President Juan Manuel Santos, who was defense minister at the time of the two raids, and Gen. Oscar Naranjo, general director of the Colombian National Police and founder of DIPOL.

“We realized that there was a great sense of distrust between the operatives and the intelligence agencies,” Santos tells the interviewer at one point. “Why? Because the intelligence wasn’t very good, because each intelligence agency gathered its own intelligence but did not share it. The key was getting all the intelligence agencies to work as one single entity. It was only when intelligence became trustworthy, and the different law enforcement agencies began to work together, that we were able to start delivering serious blows against the FARC.”

Added Naranjo: “It was absolutely essential that the war against drugs take two paths: the judicial path, where every action requires the authority of a district attorney or judges, and the intelligence path, where action can be taken that allows for the use of non-traditional techniques and ways to penetrate deep into organized crime.”

In the documentary, the DIPOL spies — whose names are changed to protect their real identities — talk about how they spent between two to five years in the field, patiently gathering information on the most mundane details, passing it along to their superiors using various tried-and-true methods. The reason: DIPOL agents first had to identify and locate the leaders worth targeting before sending fighter jets to bomb targets, or jungle commandos to raid the camps where FARC leaders were hiding out.

Nelson, for example, posed as a local vendor, selling household items like pots and pans to gather information on Mono Jojoy’s jungle camp. One day, after many uneventful months passed, a customer asked for large quantities of cotton towels — then toothpaste, deodorant, shampoo, soap and dental floss.

The intelligence agent knew he was onto something, and one day decided to join the guerrillas. He was given a Galil assault rifle, but even though he knew how to take apart a Galil and put it back together blindfolded, Nelson had to pretend he’d never seen a rifle before. Nevertheless, his ideological fervor endeared him to the local FARC chief, and Nelson the intellectual gradually rose through the ranks to become a trusted lieutenant.

Another agent, Mauricio, was ordered to seduce the sister of a guerrilla commander in order to gain information about him. But the mission almost failed when Mauricio was overcome by the girl’s body odor and bad breath; he ended up getting drunk in order to carry out the seduction and get close to her.

The third agent, Freddy, traveled to Colombia’s remote border with Ecuador, mainly to lay the groundwork for the raid that would later kill Reyes, FARC’s chief representative at the international level. He pretended to be the distant cousin of a local farmer who owned land near the border. Traveling on small boats up and down the Río Asís, he developed personal contacts with the guerrillas. Freddy communicated through a hidden drop box, leaving notes whenever he needed to get in touch with his handlers.

Freddy joined the local soccer club as a way to ingratiate himself with the locals. Eventually, he asked the local FARC commander for permission to bring his “wife” Liliana; the two had even arranged a fake honeymoon in Cartagena to back up their story. Liliana, who became a bartender, kept a satellite phone hidden among her luggage, as well as a shortwave radio to listen for encoded messages. The phony couple ended up spending three years undercover — an effort that paid off with the killing of Reyes.

Rendón, who was born in Cali and has a bachelor’s degree in economics and visual arts from North Carolina’s Duke University, said he got the idea for “Infiltrados” while writing and producing an earlier documentary for National Geographic. That film, “Operación Jaque,” told the story of the daring rescue of Ingrid Betancourt and 14 other hostages being held by FARC.

“After interviewing everybody involved, from the president on down, I got really interested in the agents who posed as part of the humanitarian mission carrying the hostages from one camp to the next. Their stories had never been told,” he said.

Rendón said his team received no financial assistance from the Colombian government for the making of “Infiltrados.” The documentary was funded entirely by Univisión.

“Fortunately, the National Police agreed to let us talk to these four particular agents. They granted me two hours with them to get their stories. I interviewed them inside the Central Intelligence building in Bogotá,” he explained. “I think my biggest challenge was how to make stories told by people whose faces you can’t show, whose voices you have to alter. The answer to that was animation. We interviewed them with a green screen behind them, and gave them an animated background that represented their part in the story.”

In addition to the agents’ recollections, Rendón’s film also features FARC guerrillas offering their opinions on a variety of subjects ranging from ideology to their harsh tropical living conditions. But Rendón didn’t do those interviews himself.

“Univisión’s special correspondent, Karl Penhaul, spent a week with this mobile FARC column and he got those interviews,” he said. “They let him in with a camera. He wasn’t concealing anything.”

One of those guerrillas, Jagwin — commander of a FARC mobile unit — discussed on-camera how his men are able to avoid being detected from the air by Colombian planes and helicopters, and how they survive. He said that every time their jungle camps are bombed, they hide in their trenches, and when the bombs stop falling and they hear machine-gun fire, they come out shooting. And unless they hear it from the command, they continue to fight and believe in the cause.

When Jagwin was told about Mono Jojoy’s death, he said his men would just keep on doing what they were taught to do – and perform in the way their leader would have wanted them to perform. Jagwin himself was killed in April 2011 in a shootout with the Colombian Army.

Meanwhile, the DIPOL agents have gone on with their lives, though readjusting to normal society hasn't always been easy for them.

Liliana, who suffered partial hearing loss as a result of an infection she contracted during the jungle mission, told the interviewer she’s now in a social reassimilation program — and that she’ll never go back to undercover work.

“I’m afraid that, one day while walking down the street, I’ll run into one of the guerrillas I was with,” said the ex-spy, adding that one of the hardest things about city life is sleeping on a normal, soft bed after years of deprivation. “But looking back, everything was worth it. I would have sacrificed everything.”

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62 Comments

  • marvin ayala | 2014-02-01

    Congratulations to all the undercover agents who completed the mission with good results and helped by being loyal to the Colombian army.

  • edilson yañez | 2011-12-22

    The guerrilla fighters are people just like anyone else, just that they got tired of all the lies and the infamy of the murderous and traitorous gringo oligarchy that sells its homeland, so they will continue to fight.

  • gonzalo | 2011-12-14

    We cannot deny how this sacrifice shows the courage of our police and soldiers, but nevertheless I think the blame for most of our problems that affect the vast majority of Colombians has to do with corruption, with all the money the government in power steals, Colombia would have enough to become fully developed. When the government proposes a march to protest for A or B reason, the people go along; recently the Attorney General proposed a march to protest corruption and no one in government, nor in the private sector, went along with him. When we marched in Bucaramanga protesting open pit mining on the Santurban plain, the government, with the complicity of some media, silenced the news. The political class thinks we are sheep.

  • Carlos Salguero | 2011-12-12

    Seen like this after a first reading, they seem to be the best. The question would be, who is responsible for the deaths of thousands of children, who due to a lack of money die of illnesses? Who does the Colombian Army serve? The big oil companies, the wealthy in the country, the monopolies, or the poor who have no work, who die of hunger, I see they are not in favor of the people. For an army to be heroic it has to define itself as in favor of who is there, the terrorists are the ones who exploit the people and starve them to death. We have to know the history of our peoples to know where we stand and not be deceived all our lives. The peoples have made history. The true armies are those who liberated their people from exploitation, don't be naive and repeat what the wealthy want.

  • ENRIQUE FERRO CAMPOS | 2011-11-25

    I want to send my regards and admiration to that elite group from the Colombian Police. I'm from Peru, and I was proud to have worked with the same kind of group and I know how much sacrifice there is, but it is worth seeing our country free of the scourge of society. It's good that everyone knows that there are men and women who give their lives for the democracy of their country, I give you my encouragement and my affection and I urge your government to not let itself be manipulated by the narco-terrorist criminals. Keep moving forward, leave a better future for your country and Latin America. GOD BLESS YOU AND DON'T STOP! RIGHT ON, COLOMBIA!

  • Enrique Montaño | 2011-11-23

    Pres. Uribe was wrong if he said the inhabitants of San Jose, or any other "Peace Community" would help the FARC. In reality, they're prisoners. If anyone tries to go beyond the fences that they have imposed on those settlements, they're executed by the FARC militia.

  • Daniel Tirado Peñaranda | 2011-11-18

    Duplicate

  • Daniel Tirado Peñaranda | 2011-11-18

    This is how a country is built, giving everything, including your life. Cheers. To the heroic men and women of Colombia.

  • paraguanà | 2011-11-13

    To my friend Camilo, who made earlier comments with tremendous resentment, criticizing the current society and complaining because he has to work hard to eat (like most of us do) because according to him he wasn't able to go to school... I want to say the following. I am of very humble origins, nevertheless I have been able to succeed with effort and dedication until I earned two degrees and I live off of that, I am not rich but I do cover my needs and I was able to educate my children.. Therefore it's not true that there are no opportunities for anyone. You have to fight and study it's the only way to pull yourself out of poverty. It's not worth blaming everyone else for your own miserable life.

  • CARLOS MEJIA | 2011-11-09

    When we all become aware of how valuable it is to be courageous and to make decisions even though they are a little or very risky, sacrificing moments, things and even relationships, we will understand or will discover the true worth and at the same time we will reap the reward, which is the desired peace for our country, giving thanks to all of the armed forces and the police and all the people who participated in these great blows to terrorism. Full wind in your sails and a calm sea for the next offensives.

  • girjaher | 2011-11-08

    I am concerned about the disclosure of military strategies.

  • hermenegildo segna | 2011-11-08

    Just like these operations are carried out, they did the same hunting down all those little doctor/politicians white-collar thieves who loot the public resources, drawing up contracts that are never executed or investing in technical studies that never go anywhere, the truth is this war would be different, there wouldn't be any human capital to support it: of course that won't happen because it would be their ruin and that of a whole bunch of corrupt military members and weapons traffickers, all that to benefit just a few -- that's Latin American, the sorry reality. :(

  • catalina | 2011-11-08

    In a speech, President Uribe accused the rural community of San José of helping the FARC. Fifteen days later a military and paramilitary group arrived and killed seven of its inhabitants and raped and killed three little girls who were 12, 7 and 5 years old. The CPI has found the Colombian government guilty of that crime. According to public prosecutor, 500 large corporations have financed paramilitary groups and the army has been an accomplice. Massacres, torture, disappearances (more than in the Southern Cone dictatorships), 3 million peasants displaced and stripped of their land. The army's institutional complicity during 3 years of barbarism has been proven beyond doubt. Who are the terrorists?

  • WilliamAugusto | 2011-11-08

    Congratulate all of the men and women who are risking their lives for the good of a whole country. And tell them I will be praying for them every day so God may bless them and protect them in their fearsome work.

  • JOSH | 2011-11-08

    BRAVO TO ALL THE COURAGEOUS MEN AND WOMEN OF OUR SECURITY FORCES, THANK YOU FOR MAKING TODAY AND TOMORROW BETTER IN THIS COUNTRY FOR OUR CHILDREN, WE CAN'T THANK YOU ENOUGH FOR YOUR NOTABLE SACRIFICE, LONG LIVE OUR NATIONAL ARMY, POLICE, NAVY, AIR FORCE AND ALL THIS HUMAN BRAVERY, AS WELL AS THE LEADERS!

  • ANA LUCIA | 2011-11-07

    HOW GREAT ARE THE MEN AND WOMEN WHO EXPOSE THEIR LIVES, THEIR FAMILIES AND ALL THEIR STABILITY, SO OTHERS MAY REAP RICHES THROUGH ANOTHER'S TOIL. THEY SHOULD INFILTRATE THE NATIONAL, STATE AND MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENTS, SINCE EACH ONE DOES WHAT IT WANTS TO THE PEOPLE.

  • ORLANDO CORAZON DE LEON | 2011-11-07

    GIVE NO RESPITE TO THE FARC DRUG TRAFFICKERS, GIVE THEM WHAT THEY GIVE THE PEOPLE, LEAD AND BOMBS, GO GLORIOUS SOLDIERS

  • ADOLFO HERNANDEZ R | 2011-11-07

    Thank you very much to our military forces, truly every day I feel more proud to be COLOMBIAN, but I also believe that we need infiltration by the intelligence sector of our military forces into the white collar bandits and have all the weight of COLOMBIAN justice fall upon them and not allow house arrest. This is just a way of saying that we have to do it, so the people will believe, please, enough with so much deceit, when justice is done for everyone and we stop protecting bandits out of friendship, or religion or their social standing, we will have true DEMOCRACY, LONG LIVE COLOMBIA, AMEN.

  • augusto | 2011-11-07

    Everyone invents their own story, they spruce it up and decorate it to make it believable, and others also invent theirs. In addition, many of us like to hear them or read them.

  • martomar castro | 2011-11-07

    WHEN THE PEOPLE BECOME MORE AWARE OR HAVE THE COURAGE TO IDENTIFY THE POLITICIANS WHO JUST GET INTO POWER TO SUPPORT A CLASS THAT HAS TAKEN ALL THEIR RIGHTS AWAY... TRULY THEN THEY WILL PUT AN END TO THE NARCO TERRORISTS AND DRUG TRAFFICKERS, LET US SUPPORT OUR ARMIES,,,,, AND BE MORE AWARE DURING THE ELECTIONS,,,, CLEAN OUT THE CORRUPT POLITICIANS,,, WHO STEAL MILLIONS..... AND ENJOY SO MANY PRIVILEGES.........

  • wilson | 2011-11-07

    It hurts so much to see stateless people who are servile to the U.S. I am not justifying the attacks or the kidnapping of people during a political conflict. But if the guerrilla force is bad, the government is worse. Just look around at how much poverty there is, homeless people, abandoned children, and the white collar criminals have a license to export drugs through transnational companies. The drugs are for people with lots of money who bribe those who say they defend the homeland. That intelligence they used to put an end to the guerrilla force why don't they also apply it to the transnational corporations and the people in the high levels of the oligarchy, such as, for example, Ardila Lule Grupo Santo Domingo. I am writing here but I am certain that in MY COLOMBIA there is no freedom of the press because the press is servile to a stateless oligarchic system.

  • arcey | 2011-11-06

    Congratulations to OUR PATRIOTIC COLOMBIAN ARMY, let me tell you that you are great warriors, you are the best army in all the world, thank you for giving your life for your Colombian homeland, thank you ALVARO URIBE V. you were the best president Colombia had, keep it up Dr. Alvaro, we are with you even though lots of people are interested in obscuring your noble cause, we always remember you fondly and loyally, you served the Colombian homeland with love and dignity, you formed a STUPENDOUS AND HARD-FIGHTING ARMY, LONG LIVE OUR COLOMBIA IN PEACE

  • CAMILO | 2011-11-06

    NICE STORY FOR THE MOVIES. I WONDER, HOW MANY GUERRILLA INFILTRATORS ARE THERE IN THE COLOMBIAN ARMED FORCES MIGHT SOMEONE MAKE A DOCUMENTARY ABOUT THEM, WHEN THEIR PLANS BECOME REALITY, THEY BROUGHT DOWN RAUL REYES, MONO JOJOY, ALFONSO CANO. I AM HAPPY FOR THESE PEOPLE, THEY WEREN’T WORTH ANYTHING, WHEN WILL THEY BRING DOWN HUNGER? WHEN WILL WE SEE THE DAY WHEN WE HAVE BREAKFAST WITHOUT WORRYING ABOUT DINNER AND IF WE HAVE DINNER WE’LL BE ABLE TO SLEEP BECAUSE TOMORROW I HAVE TO WORK BECAUSE THANK GOD I HAVE WORK, I AM HEALTHY, LET’S NOT TELL OURSELVES ANY MORE LIES, THE NEXT GUERRILLA LEADERS ARE ALREADY FORMING. THEY ARE BEING FORMED BY HUNGER, INJUSTICE, TELEVISION, THE GOVERNMENT. IT IS POSSIBLE THAT SOMEONE WHO COULD INFILTRATE OUR ARMED FORCES WOULD HAVE THE COURAGE TO PUT UP WITH HUNGER LIKE MANY COLOMBIANS DO. IT IS POSSIBLE THAT ONE OF THOSE INFILTRATORS DOES WHAT HE DOES OUT OF LOVE FOR COLOMBIA. HE KNOWS THAT BEING AN INFILTRATOR IS GOOD BUSINESS, HIS FAMILY LIVES WELL, HE’LL HAVE A SALARY FOR LIFE TRUE HEALTH A HOUSE FOR THE WEEKENDS, AND HIS CHILDREN STUDYING IN THE BEST PRIVATE UNIVERSITIES IN COLOMBIA. IT’S GOOD BUSINESS BEING AN INFILTRATOR WHILE COMMON PEOPLE LIKE ME PUT UP WITH HUNGER, WITH POLICE BRUTALITY, SOCIAL INJUSTICES. THIS IS MY COLOMBIA AND IN SPITE OF IT ALL I WILL STAY IN MY COLOMBIA IN THE HOPE THAT SOMEDAY THINGS WILL CHANGE; MAYBE I WON’T BE ON THIS EARTH BECAUSE A BRAIN TUMOR HAS COME INTO MY LIFE AND I DON’T HAVE THE SLIGHTEST HOPE THAT THINGS WILL CHANGE BEFORE I DIE… COLOMBIA YOU ARE A PARADISE WHERE THE OLIGARCHS STEP ON SOFT GROUND AND WE ARE THE GROUND THEY STEP ON WITH NO FEAR OF BEING PUNISHED… CAMILO

  • julian davd londoño | 2011-11-04

    I believe that dialogue is no longer the best option. It is true that we are dealing with many problems, but the FARC is definitively the AIDS of Colombia.

  • perz juan | 2011-11-03

    Hunger, misery and exploitation. If it doesn't end there will always be people who defy those life conditions, such as the FARC

  • pedro pablo | 2011-11-03

    Everyone writes about realities in a very personal way, life is a dynamic of consequences, where a balance is created, but when that balance exceeds its limits, it turns into a problem. The fundamental basis of the family is education lack thereof starts a chain of incalculable problems, the guerrilla forces arise in search of social balance deviating out of the interests of conflict their financial life and using the weakest for their comfort. I believe politics are a legalized guerrilla force which uses the voter to take over the government's money, but nevertheless it leaves some investments, the guerrilla force operates with drug trafficking, paid assassinations, extortions but it doesn't leave a school a hospital what it leaves is a bad memory of crimes and he who does not respect the life of another will not enter the kingdom of God.... THE POLITICIANS SHOULD START THE WAR BUT NOT WITH AMBITIONS TO MAKE THEIR WAY EASIER BUT RATHER TO MAKE EVERYONE'S WAY EASIER.

  • hermes cavalheiro | 2011-11-02

    THE UNION OF RURAL WORKERS OF GUAPORE RIVER VALLEY IN THE STATE OF RONDÔNIA COMES WITH ALL DUE RESPECT AND RESPONSIBILITY TO CONGRATULATE THESE COMPETENT HEROES FOR THOSE INCOMPARABLE COMPETENCIES FOR THEY ARE THE FRUIT OF A CREATOR. THIS WE MUST PASS ON TO OUR CHILDREN AND GRANDCHILDREN AND GREAT GRANDCHILDREN EVENTUALLY. SINCE THEY ARE SIGNIFICANT AND REWARDING EXAMPLES. CONGRATULATIONS TO THESE EXCEPTIONAL AGENTS WITHOUT THESE BRAVE HEROES WE COULDN’T WIN, BECAUSE THEY ARE FRUIT ONLY GOD CAN PRODUCE, WE’RE VERY PROUD TO BE FAMILIES DESCENDING FROM WAR EXPEDITIONARIES BECAUSE WE WERE OFTEN CHASED BY MANY CORRUPTED OFFICIALS FROM OUR STATE OF RONDÔNIA. WHEN WE WANTED TO REGISTER THIS UNION, WHICH IS NOW PRIVATE, WE WERE EVEN ARRESTED AND ACCUSED AND CONVICTED, BUT GOD ALWAYS HELPS HIS FOLKS. IT’S NOT FUNCTIONING BUT HAS BEEN REGISTERED IN ALL THE LEGAL PROCEDURES, SO TODAY WE ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR OUR MILITARY BEING ON THE BORDERS SINCE IT’S AN HONOR TO US LEADERS WHO DON’T FEAR OUR OWN DEATH!!! SO CONGRATULATIONS TO THOSE GREAT FIGHTING STARS. WE ARE YOUR ADMIRERS FOREVER, WHILE WE LIVE. ON BEHALF OF OUR DEAR MEMBERS AND OUR DEAR HONORED LEADERS WHO NEVER GIVE UP A FIGHT SO A BIG THANKS TO ALL THE BRAVE AND HONORED SOLDIERS OF THE BEAUTIFUL NEIGHBORING COUNTRIES OF BRAZIL. MANY THANKS ONCE MORE. HERMES CAVALHEIRO-LINHA-51-KM-01-ZONA RURAL SERINGUEIRAS-BR-429-RONDÔNIA.

  • WALTER REYES | 2011-11-02

    What's been discovered? That we Colombians are intelligent. It's been demonstrated around the world, intelligence isn't just within the Military Forces, or the police. They study strategies and all their work is analyzed beforehand. Here it's about applying all that INTELLIGENCE, on the true focus of all the evil in the country, THE POLITICAL CLASS. That's where all our evil is derived. I ask who is worse, 1) He who takes a weapon and left and right kills children, women, men and the elderly, 2) He who, based on his political and administrative power, plans how to STEAL the money the GOVERNMENT GENERATES in order to distribute to the people through HEALTH, EDUCATION AND HOUSING? The first is an emotionally unbalanced murderer, and we can quantify the evil he does or has done. What should we call the second one? And if we could quantify, how many children leave a school, how many children, women, elderly die because of lack of medicine? Quantify this all over the national territory, these are the true massacres, or do you believe that it was just a little bit that was being taken by the EPS, SALUDCOOP, and ALL THE REST? And since when? So it is here in up-and-coming political groups, in the traditional ones, where there should be good INFILTRATORS, to have enough proof to put those true white collar bandits where they belong. They don't care if the people get an education, or are healthy. They pay for private medicine they don't go to an EPS. The best doctors are their friends. EDUCATE AND FEED THE PEOPLE, THAT IS HOW WE WILL BECOME A BETTER COUNTRY.... AND BELIEVE IN GOD...

  • orland | 2011-11-02

    All I can say to you is... Thank you for your enormous sacrifice, effort and courage. We honest people have no way to pay you back for what you do, knowing it could cost your life, not taking into account any risks, you do it with the firm conviction that you want a better tomorrow for all Colombians, without war or killings.

  • blanca quintero | 2011-11-01

    Here we don't judge individuals, here we judge institutions. Fortunately, over time the lies have been revealed and now we see the case of Mapiripan, a group of lawyers who surely have accomplices among the public officials, researchers, etc. who are determined to take and take, fully believing that money makes them powerful and surely it does, but just for a while, because when they fall, the kingdom comes to an end. I thank all those people who sacrifice their family life and health, seeking an end to Colombia's enemies who are our brothers who have erred in their struggle. Can you imagine Colombia without any drug trafficking, paramilitary groups, common criminals? We would all have the chance to educate our children, to have a house, a worthy job, etc., with all the money invested in the war. How annoying. We Colombians have to pay the banks 4 per thousand and they have the justice system clogged up with all the collections lawsuits that I would call the theft of people's homes. When all this comes to an end we will have peace and social justice.

  • Fercho | 2011-11-01

    As long as the drug traffickers wish to make money by taking advantage of the needs and innocence of so many Colombians, this war they have declared against the people will never end. As long as the mafia heads of drug trafficking are protected by Chavez and Correa, by Ortega and Evo, the poor children they use as cannon fodder will continue to fall in Colombia's fields and cities. Terrorism supported by drug trafficking is a lethal mixture of murderers and pedophiles who further destroy a society born of peace and progress. Communism is the worst plague in the world and is responsible for almost every atrocity in modern times and has caused so much pain for Colombian families. That's why these Colombians who the author calls spies are modern heroes worthy of admiration. My sincere respect for them and for their families.

  • OSCAR VENGOECHEA ABAD | 2011-11-01

    EXCELLENT DOCUMENTARY. ABOVE ALL, GREAT WORK BY OUR MILITARY FORCES, THE POLICE AND THE ARMY, A HUG TO ALL OF THEM, I HOPE THEY DO AWAY WITH ALL THE RATS IN OUR SORRY COUNTRY WHERE OUR FUTURE (THE CHILDREN) IS IN SAD AGONY....A PEOPLE UNITED WILL NEVER BE DEFEATED.

  • Erick villalba | 2011-11-01

    The simple fact that they risk their health and their lives is enough to categorize them as Heroes.

  • Erick villalba | 2011-11-01

    The simple fact that they put their health and lives at risk is enough to categorize them as Heroes.

  • Luis Alfonso Loaiza Hurtado | 2011-10-31

    I am sure that if each of today's militants in guerrilla organizations or any other irregular group had read Gandhi, the apostle of peace, on peaceful resistance - he got rid of 300,000 Englishmen without shooting a single bullet - they never would have taken up a rifle to sacrifice a brother. Here is one of his prayers: "Humbly I will strive to love, to tell the truth, to be honest and pure, to not possess anything I do not need, to earn my wages by my work, to be aware always of what I eat and drink, to never be fearful, to respect the beliefs of others, to seek the best for everyone always, to be a brother to all my brothers." GANDHI

  • Papeleta | 2011-10-31

    The Colombian armed forces are the greatest in the world right now, but it's a shame that if the guerrillas don't kill them en masse, because they never leave the front lines, the judges in this country of the Sacred Heart of Christ condemn them in the courts. The recognition they get in this documentary is good.

  • pedro jose | 2011-10-30

    Whoever thinks the guerrilla movement is going to take power is NOT even close ... A group has been sowing terror in our country for over 40 years and because of them the paramilitary groups are born. Large cattle ranchers and farmworkers take up arms and start to mount their own defense BECAUSE OF THE ABUSES BY THE SO-CALLED FARC, CARRYING OUT EXTORTIONS AND KIDNAPPINGS. IF THE FARC DIDN'T EXIST THE PARAMILITARY GROUPS WOULD NEVER HAVE COME INTO BEING....................

  • WILSON MENDOZA | 2011-10-30

    This is my dear, beloved, admired and glorious National Army. Long live the four branches of the armed forces of my beloved country who are pounding those mangy, flea-ridden, stinky, useless, hairy, lice-ridden dogs the terrorist FARC, criminal assassins. Onward heroes of our homeland, because victory is at hand. If you don't bring them down, the jungle and its dangers will. Total extermination of those assassins, criminals, without the FARC we will live happily and in harmony. What's fair is fair, we've already suffered too much because of those mangy dogs with no master.

  • EDGAR | 2011-10-30

    Thank you to our GLORIOUS ARMY! Today we can breathe more freely. We have to keep supporting them and protecting them against those who want to legislate against them, putting them like cannon fodder in front of the terrorists of the FARC, ELN "Colombian women and men" (read im-pious Cordoba) and pseudo leaders such as: Chavez, Correa, Evo, etc. Thank you Mr. ALVARO URIBE VELEZ, you gave the Armed Forces of Colombia teeth and never left them alone like previous governments did. Now, with one single bullet against a military member of our homeland, the Colombian Air Force displays an air offensive with positive results. Thank you for this film Mr. JUAN RENDÓN.

  • richi | 2011-10-28

    The following comment is to congratulate those in this country who work hard every day to support their families, who struggle believing that tomorrow will be better.

  • rafael beltran | 2011-10-28

    I agree with what the Military Forces are doing to fight terrorism but not with the arrogance and abuse of power against our brothers the rural workers who have nothing to do with the conflict and who through no fault of their own are in the middle of a war that doesn't belong to them, suffering with their children and their families. We need policies to help improve the standard of living for our brothers, whom we are running over and displacing to the big cities to suffer from the indifference of everyone who lives there, in the middle of the lack of security in cities that also arises from the scourge of displacement. No more ... for God's sake.

  • glenis orellano | 2011-10-28

    No one can speak of triumphs when hunger continues to spread and the amount of people in poverty is increasing.

  • rafael.Perea C | 2011-10-27

    Very good and educational for the intelligence services of other countries. Long live my Colombia, dear land that I love. Since my roots are Colombian, I love my land a lot.

  • jhon diaz | 2011-10-27

    Definitely in this country or in the countries where there are insurgent groups lots of people are missing. The large massacres that the paramilitary groups have generated are incredible. Close to Puerto Lopez Meta I saw the large number of troops coming out of Mapiripan and investigating more than 40,000 people buried, among them paramilitary members themselves because they were fighting for the territory, and so on all over the country. Along with this, all those who they find along the road disappear with no respect for the lives of children and the elderly. And now cheating the shipping and transport companies with the story that they are cooperatives to extort them. They act as sponsors and make the workers get raises through strikes to be able to extort them. In the plains it used to be the FARC, but now it's paramilitary groups or BACRIM (criminal groups), which is the new name their boss gave them to avoid losing power in politics, making the Colombian people believe that there are no more paramilitary groups. The white collar thieves in the cities and also the drugs on the streets are manipulated by the BACRIMs. My question now is how to fix this country, which is increasingly extortive and expensive.

  • jorge pedraza o | 2011-10-27

    If the government is unwilling and doesn't give the Armed Forces the legal and material means to do its work, then it will be impossible to put an end to the guerrilla organizations. It has increased the bureaucracy and reduced the number of professional soldiers. The first thing they should attack is drug trafficking, which drives the war. Second, focus on the minds of students and the unions. They praise the guerrilla organizations and tell lots of lies. If people don't work the State cannot feed so many helpless people. If you gave me food, I wouldn't work either and the country would become the domain of the lower classes. Prohibit teaching communism and teach the basic rules of coexistence to put an end to violence.

  • G. Bolivar | 2011-10-27

    What a good article. Colombia's judges should be counseled, in an attempt to raise their awareness and put an end to the implacable persecution of members of the Armed Forces. On the contrary, they ought to condemn the murderous drug traffickers and not give them any benefits nor facilitate their rescue by their friends (Ex: Pablito). They are truly heroes, but regardless, those who fight in the mountains have enemies who are more dangerous than the drug traffickers themselves and these are: the dictatorship of the judges, the "farco"politicians, the NGOs, human rights organizations and the yellow press. In the last few days we have sadly seen how policemen and soldiers are mercilessly massacred, who are given the final blow, (this is in a completely defenseless state) but no one cries for these heroes and the media think they deserve just a few lines or words that are already forgotten the next day. It should be clarified in the previous article that the narco terrorist Jojoy was not assassinated, he was brought down fully armed at a camp, with a gang of villains under his command. This stuff about assassination would only cross the mind of the vociferous and threatening comrade Correa, his master Chavez and the dictatorship of judges, who add that these narco terrorists kill out of altruism. Now, given the new best friend of comrade Neighbor, commitments have made him deny the camps and the presence of the FARC leadership in that country, and they capture or deport just those who fall into disgrace with that murky organization, not without creating true paraphernalia beforehand. Yet, the violence on the borders with Venezuela and Ecuador (and very soon Peru) shows they operate from those territories.

  • jorge cortes | 2011-10-25

    The acronym "FARC" doesn't stand for "Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia," its true meaning is: "Revolutionary Armed Forces of Communism" and their mission is to take power through force of arms, murdering the population that does not agree with their ideology, with no regard for whether they are men, women, children or the elderly or even their own families, ignoring the laws and the National Constitution. Can you imagine these murderers in power? Can you imagine where it will lead us if we allow these criminals to get to the Nariño Palace and take over the presidency and the different ministries of government? There won't be enough cemeteries to bury our Heroes who have always fought these criminals whose goal is to massacre their own brothers to achieve their purpose of imposing terror.

  • alvro noreña | 2011-10-25

    Excellent. I have great admiration for our HEROES in the ARMED FORCES. Thank you for giving us these facts.

  • Ede Botfalusi | 2011-10-24

    The article is very well written and extremely interesting.

  • juan pablo angel velez | 2011-10-24

    The only solution to conflicts is through dialogue. The army has a lot of intelligence, it's true, but what about the rest? In Colombia and in the world there will be war for a long time if they don't come to agreements through dialogue.

  • catalina cardona | 2011-10-23

    Speaking of terrorism, when is the international legal system going to punish the atrocities committed by the Colombian Army during 3 decades of complicity with the paramilitary groups: 4 million displaced, 180,000 murdered, 57,000 disappeared by state agents (according to the Attorney General's Office), 2,700 innocent victims kidnapped, executed and identified as guerrilla fighters, and a laundry list of other crimes against humanity????

  • arian | 2011-10-21

    If anyone in the world today deserves to be called a hero, it's the men and women of the Colombian Army and Police.

  • Carlos Bolivar | 2011-10-18

    I really admire the bravery and courage of these individuals. It isn't as easy as it seems in James Bond movies. This is the real thing. I take my hat off to them.

  • simòn | 2011-10-17

    I don't agree with divulging military and intelligence strategies. This method should also be applied to the political class (all chambers of the federal government) and the managerial class in our country. The place is plagued with white collar antisocial people.

  • Lucas | 2011-10-15

    I am so pleased that the Colombian Intelligence service is fostering a Culture of Intelligence and is reaching out to different media and processes in order to do so. But with all respect the many nameless who belong to this specialty, who have given the government so much glory and have died in action, I beg of you be more Humble and give greater recognition to those who have cultivated these activities. The intelligence service within the National Police, as well as others who came out of Military Intelligence and are rooted its doctrine. And when talking about operations, I feel a deep sadness due to the arrogant self aggrandizement they engage in, ignoring the sacrifice of many others, such as the DAS and the armed forces. Above all, this note is a plea for the creation of a Government Intelligence System, free of biases and worn-out self aggrandizement, with true patriotic collaboration and sacrifice. Remember that the role of Government Intelligence is permanent, silent, patient, but above all, HUMAN!

  • luisa | 2011-10-14

    In my view, I believe that this organization will never end, since the government itself is involved in it. That's why you saw that Colombia's Administrative Department of Security (DAS) DIDN'T DO ANYTHING, NOR WILL IT DO ANYTHING SINCE THERE ARE TOO MANY INTERESTS INVOLVED FOR COLOMBIA AS WELL AS FOR THE U.S.A. According to the DAS, they were in charge of controlling the drug trade. And it turns out some bases are located on the border and that's where we've seen them in control. Please, let's not kid ourselves: if it's the FARC who produce and engage in trafficking, imagine these bases with all the power they have. They've even got submarines to do the deal.

  • julio | 2011-10-12

    The ABCs we have to protect are: a lifestyle; a reason for being, for belonging; customs, given to us by the elders among us and our other comrades; more of the citizens, which is why they enroll in the police force, and in the army. I hope that many of us do things, brave things, for our nations; each one doing what he knows in order to carry out our civic duties. And also religion helps us improve. Long live the good customs.

  • Vandemar Pedro | 2011-10-12

    People from other nations, set in their ways, indifferent, “tolerate” the suffering of others, the injustice that they themselves do not face, the horror from which they are spared. This is not tolerance, it is selfishness, insensitivity, complicity with evil, by omission or abandonment. It’s collaborating and cooperating with intolerance. Tolerance is not passivity. Congratulations Juan Rendón and those who helped him in one way or another. Above all, congratulations for the courage, the determination, the generosity and the humanitarian spirit. The world must know what the FARC is, what cold, inhumane, material and calculating terrorism is like.

  • Wilson Afranio | 2011-10-11

    This is how you carry out intelligence on these terrorists and this is how you treat them. The only law they understand is the law of the lead bullet and the extermination of their commanders. It's a shame that there are still so many ignorant people getting themselves killed because of their resentment toward society. I'm talking about the scruffy, stinky, illiterate, ignorant guerrilla fighters.

  • Carlos Molleturo Freire | 2011-10-09

    I think that in order to eradicate the diabolical, which is what organizations like the REVOLUTIONARY ARMED FORCES of Colombia sometimes become, not only do we need people who are highly trained in the art of espionage - a very old art indeed - but also the awareness that if there is no supply there will be no demand. As long as there are countries that do nothing in this regard then we will always have these groups.

  • TITA | 2011-10-09

    HONOR TO THOSE WHO DESERVE TO BE HONORED! And that is our glorious COLOMBIAN ARMY, who give their lives for their country. Those guerrilla fighters deserve the death penalty. They don't follow any ideology, they're a bunch of drug traffickers and murderers. God bless Colombia and I hope they do away with those guerrilla fighters forever...

  • raul | 2011-10-09

    To the subtle men and women and the discrete intelligence services of the Armed Forces and the police in every country, especially in Latin America: My respects and admiration at this time to those in Colombia, keep it up until you reach the rabbit hole of social rights.

Fri Apr 18 00:18:59 2014

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